Dinner with Dwight



HAPPINESS,
is to have EVERYTHING,
you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.



 

02.24.2020-Monday-Dinner with Dwight

I’ve mentioned Dwight in the past. It was our pleasure to meet up with him, and his traveling cat companion, Dennis, now deceased, on our Alaskan Tour back in 2016. Dwight acquired a new coach last year and is making plans for traveling this year. Did I forget to mention that Dwight is ninety-years-old. Like all of us over seventy, he too has a medical problem or two. 

Upper left is a quick picture of the two-bedroom home he has in New Port Richie in Florida. His home has a beautiful floor plan which looks and feels much bigger than it really is. His two sons live nearby which is nice. This was our first time to this area. Needless to say, like all of Florida, it’s building like there’s no tomorrow.

The high spot of the day was his choice for an eatery. The Thai Bistro in New Port. The food and service was excellent, especially the calamari. The visit went by so quickly. We continue to keep in touch with him, not as mush as we should, and our happy to hear the different venues he’s gone to, even some that we’ve visited as well. It took us about an hour to travel each way and by the time we got home again it was time to feed Scoots. I treated myself to a fifteen-minute siesta before a light dinner.

Giraffe Ranch



HAPPINESS,
is to have EVERYTHING,
you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.



02.19.2020-Wednesday- Giraffe Ranch

We awoke this morning with great optimism, our first filed trip of the 2020 Travel Year. The weatherman appears to be on our side, low humidity and mid to high eighties. We will visit the Giraffe Ranch which is owned and managed by Les Salisbury and wife Elena Sheppa.

 

Carla is standing in front of the Ostriches not just for looks. It goes without saying they are tall, they are! Almost six-feet or more. Shown above are Les and Elena, the Zoo-Keepers, owners, guides and, I’m sure, “fill-in when needed staff” as well. Carla and I know that position very well from experience.

   

This location is the registration office and gift store. Above you see the many expedition packages you can opt for. A family of four just ahead of us are writing a check for over fifteen-hundred dollars opting for an experience package much more expansive than what were opting for.

                 (Pantagonian Cavies)             (Lemur pops, I think) 

You’ll have to basically enjoy the pictures since there was no way I could record all the information that was imparted to us this day. Below is a family of rodents. Pantagonian cavies, Actually they are the fifth largest (in size) of all the rodents in the world. Did you know that a rabbit is a rodent…It IS!

There are many turtles on this ranch. These two will be joined by a third at the end of our trip. I’ll let you use your imagination as to what you think they might be doing. It’s Florida. Just wouldn’t be fair not to have a family of alligators on the ranch.

We will enjoy this forty-acres ranch in the comfort of the Safari-Jeep, actually I think it was a Chevy. It may not look like it but it was very comfortable. We were given behavior instructions in the beginning and the group were excellent in following these safety instructions throughout the trip. Carla examines the “bony” horns as our guides and owners give us a short history on the biophysical formation of these structures.

The Camel Expedition. This, I think, might be one of the more expensive day-trips. It’s not shown in this photo but  the owner-guide will give this tour on his Segway. Given the two options I’d probably opt for the Segway as opposed to a camel as well. As you can see in the picture below many of the animals are permitted to intermingle all over the ranch. The objective of the ranch is to provide, as much as possible, an environment similar to what the animals would be enjoying in a jungle.

Above is a portable chicken-coop. Up to two-dozen chickens will inhabit this domicile for 3-4-days then a worker will relocate it to another location which will continually give the chickens a clean and grassy home. I wish my brother Rich was reading my blog since I’m sure he’d be interested in this product.This is a far-away shot of possibly one-third of the cages and caged-walkways located on the farm. Even those animals not permitted to wander over  the farm in general are given rambling enclosed cages to exercise as much a possible.

This is a far-away shot of the Registration building and covered open visitors gathering place. These are the guys we came to visit; Giraffes! They are permitted to wander freely over a large portion of this ranch but have been passively trained to understand that when the Safari-Jeep appears it means it’s feeding time and time to mix with the visitors. Even I got into the act and tried my hand at feeding these awesome creatures.

 

As you can tell from the pictures they are not shy. They are surprisingly tame and friendly. Here you see Carla feeding just one of many that came begging for treats. Our guide, Elena, encourages us to get involved and feed as many as possible. She even turned the vehicle around to allow those on the other side to lend a hand as well. Carla just proof-read the blog and liked it but insisted it was light on Giraffe pictures, so I added a couple more. Sadly this has to be a distance shot. They look like deer but they’re not. In particular please notice the one that is third from the start; just a baby!

(Blackbucks, I think)

The baby, once again. We’re told that this species have a single mind-set; to follow their leader which is always a female-maybe they know something we don’t! Zebras! And others. If I recall correctly we were told that the Zebra to the left is still a youngster. Its’ stripes will develop after a while. A youngster asked if flies bother the Zebras? I never gave it  thought, of course they must! But NO, they don’t! The zookeepers tell us the the stripes of the zebras confuse the flies, so as a result, they just keep picking on the horses. The ranch has no horses but we did notice that flies have no qualms about annoying rhinos.

Enjoy the pictures since I do not remember who these critters are.

The ranch originally was a “dry”ranch with no lakes or small bodies of water to tap into. To acquire water they were forced to drill down over seventy feet to find the water they needed for the animals. Then a couple of years ago they had to endure a three-hurricane season. As a result they lost many of their big oak trees that could not survive the forty-eight inches of ground water the flooded the ranch. An oak tree shows the water line on one of the many trees that survived the ordeal. A small lake was the by-product of these storms and the lake, as you saw in a previous picture, which continues to retain a generous amount of water for all. Below is the Rhino. He and his kind are doomed for extinction possibly in our children’s lifetime. Zookeepers all over the world are trying to breed  and grow the heard in captivity but it’s a slow and expensive process. 

The zookeepers here have been desperately looking to do the same, however. Their rhino is experiencing a dermatitis as a result of inbreeding. This affliction is why they have not been given the opportunity to help the cause. Scientist feel their rhino is not a good candidate for breeding. Once again, just enjoy the pics. If you know what these animals are please comment and I’ll edit the blog with your information.

 

Another shot of the extensive caged and enclosed walkway system this ranch has provided for their  inhabitants.

Our first and most enjoyable trip of this Twenty-Twenty Travel season. Would we recommend this trip…absolutely! This is not one of those venues that are in your face every time you turn around. This is a mom/pop endeavor they have been working at for twenty-one years. Previously Les managed a large zoo for 21-years, so experience abounds. Elena, his wife, is equally credentialed. I have just tried to acquire more information on the Giraffe Ranch through Facebook but failed. We both really enjoyed this experience and will edit this blog as more information becomes available.

It’s been years since I’ve done this but for more information

on this beautiful experience go to: CLICK- Link to Giraffe Ranch

Tripping, Connie & Pincher’s



HAPPINESS,
is to have EVERYTHING,
you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


 

01.13.2020 Monday-PDF Blog, Travel, Connie & Pincher’s
The trip to Ft.Meyers took about four hours and thankfully was uneventful. The city and those around it  have changed so much. Apartment buildings and single family homes are popping up all over. The campground is one of the oldest but very nicely maintained. All the camp road ways are paved but are very narrow. They do provide assistance to newcomers which we took advantage of. We made it to our site without a scratch.

By mid-afternoon Connie and Sharon, family of Carla’s were visiting us in the coach. We had a delightful meeting with them who were also RVers camping nearby. We must have talked ourselves hungry so we opted to visit Pincher’s Seafood Restaurant. Our server, Britt, was delightful and very knowledgeable. she was great in helping Carla with her “carbohydrate-free” meal. We also enjoyed an awesome sunset over the water, made possible since we’re on the Gulf-coast of Florida. I haven’t even mentioned the calamari appetizer. It was a bountiful dish and we made short work of it. After returning from Pincher’s I finished the PDF conversion of the 2019 blogs and journals.

 Please check it out by clicking on: goto Monthly Directory Page

By clicking on this link will take you to a directory of 2019 travel destinations by month. All the blogs for that month are contained in this PDF format. I like it and welcome comments. It’s a very clean format with no chance of losing pictures or even having them get dislodged. Once you get to the Directory Page you’ll need to click on the month of your choosing then click on the file address. The PDF will open instantaneously.
Leave comments on what you think of it.

Boondocks Restaurant




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Click =>: November Journals

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


11.02.2019- Boondocks Restaurant

Not that many pictures of our dinner at Boondocks. This restaurant is located in Port Orange, FL. Back, a few years ago, Carla and I had a weekend retreat at Seabird Island only a few miles from the restaurant. Mary Ann lived at the Island full-time.

It’s not that we patronized the restaurant that often, , we’re not that well off, but we did go occasionally. The picture at the bottom is a fast action shot using a very fast camera and shutter speed but the action of the fish as thousands of them attacked a small portion of fish thrown into the water by someone eating who just wanted to see the speed at which the fish will go after anything edible.

The visit was excellent only to be surpassed by the delicious food we consumed. Hopefully next time we visit the East coast we’ll do this again.

You’ll never feel you have enough money to retire,
however, once you feel you have enough money,
will you have enough time?

Cathedral of St. Mary, Peoria



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at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

Click here to: go to Sept. Journals

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need. NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


9.17.2019-Cathedral of St; Mary of the Immaculate Conception

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our goal today is to discover and experience everything of Fulton J. Sheen. Our first building will be a Museum dedicated to him and his legacy. This, as I’m sure you realize, is not the Fr. Sheen in body, just a picture. It would have been an honor to have really met him, however.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside this building is the complete history of this great priest and orator. It contains videos and a slew of pictures of his life. It was in the Cathedral next door, the Cathedral of St Mary of the Immaculate Conception, that he prayed, was a deacon, served as a priest and pastor here and eventually his body would be finally laid to rest at the alter to the left side of the church.

0049K

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courtesi of Wikipedia:

The Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception (commonly known as St. Mary’s Cathedral) is a cathedral of the Catholic Church located in Peoria, Illinois, United States. It is the seat of the Diocese of Peoria, where the Catholic televangelist and sainthood candidate Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen was born and raised, and ordained a priest. Since 2019, the cathedral has been his place of burial. The cathedral is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a contributing property in the North Side Historic District.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I first took this picture it was the alter of Our Lady of Perpetual Help. That, by itself, was significant and important. It wasn’t until we left the Room of Relics that I learned that the big white object directly in front of this altar laid the final resting place of Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen. His tomb lies below the image of Our Lady of Perpetual Help. Originally his tomb was located in St  Patrick Cathedral in New York but in 2019 in celebration of his Centennial Year of his ordination in 1919.

On June 27, 2019, the remains of Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen were disinterred from St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York, where he was buried in 1979, and transferred to St. Mary’s Cathedral.[8] They are entombed in a marble monument at a side altar dedicated to Our Lady of Perpetual Help. The Archdiocese of New York fought a three-year court battle to keep his remains there. As a child, Sheen served as an altar boy in St. Mary’s Cathedral and he was ordained a priest here in 1919 for the Diocese of Peoria, which has sponsored his cause for canonization.[9

Above left is the alter of St. Joseph. Above right was the corridor to the Room of Relics. In this room you’ll see dozens of relics from many well-known saints and many more from saints of the past. As you can see the architecture in this Cathedral is no -less than awesome. All the stain-glass windows are richly colored in  blue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above are more pictures from the Relics Room. Below right is another picture of the tomb of Archbishop Sheen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In order for us to experience the Archbishop Fulton J Sheen Museum and St. Mary Cathedral we had to park the coach and toed. This meant filling three meters with coins to park.

You’ll never feel you have enough money to retire,
however, once you feel you have enough money,
will you have enough time?

Visiting the MacDougall’s family



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

Click here to: go to Sept. Journals

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.

NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


9.03.2019 Visiting Don, Joyce and Family

Don and Joyce will be wining and dining us for the next two weeks. Visiting here is as close to visiting home as I could ask for. Below is just a small part of the MacDougall clan; Paul, Ivy and Little Paul. Below right is Duncan and Malcolm.

 

Above and below we enjoy a night out at Noodles and Company. This is getting to be almost a tradition to visit this restaurant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The MacDougall residence. Their home may appear to be a little small but this home has a heart as big as you can imagine. Yes, if the light poll in the picture above left appears to be leaning, the answer is yes. Not sure if the leaning pole was intentional or whether the area experience a mild quake; who knows? Before the two-week visit came to an end, Carla and I were treated to a host of family dinners…Awesome!

You’ll never feel you have enough money to retire,
however, once you feel you have enough money,
will you have enough time?

Ellsworth AF Base

 



Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.    NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


8.21.2019- The Ellsworth Air Force Base

Above right is the first powerhouse rocket, Titan. Below is a B-1 Bomber. This plane can fly to and deliver a full load of armaments anywhere in the world, with perfect accuracy. There’s also a gift shop, as always.

We are now inside the missile silo. This rocker is big! If and when this missile is ever implemented the force of the rocket will ultimately destroy this silo. The truth is the government will never activate just one missile. Should one missile be needed ALL 153 missiles will be activated because the use of this nuclear bomb will constitute an almost end of days scenario.

Behind Carla is a stage-like structure. Should a new rocket be needed this enclosure will be opened to allow placement of a new rocket. Behind the truck-like unit behind Carla is the cover protecting the rocket inside. This cover weighs way over one-hundred tons. It is totally pneumatic if needed to be open. The purpose of this is to guarantee that no computer or mechanical glitches could interfere in the opening of the silo tube. We were told it would only take fifteen seconds to remove this cover. Top right and bottom are some views of this small city with a city. Everything any military personnel would need or want to do is on this property.

Pictures above are of the control centers for this silo. Military personnel here work 24-hour shifts. Below is the plane that was used to fly a candy-drop to build public relation’s in the ’40s.

Left is a B-1B Bomber. My question was what happened to the B-1A bomber. The “A” bomber was built by another contractor than the “B” version. It was twice as fast, going well over mark-2 and was twice as expensive. It had other problems also. The “B” version flies at mark 1.2 but was only half as expensive, so the decision was made for the, I think, Boeing product. This plane has the ability to adjust it wing formation to increase both its speed and stealth abilities.Just as a side note for air-products that have been awesome is the B-52 Bomber, a product of the 50’s. This plane is no longer being built but the Air Force will be leaving this product in service until 2030 or longer, only because it has been such a perfect plane. It continues to be updated and upgraded as new technology presents itself.

This text is courtesy of AirplaneMuseums.com

In January of 1942, the U.S. War Department established Rapid City Army Air Base as a training location for B-17 Flying Fortress heavy bomber units.

In July of 1945 Rapid City AAB was placed on standby status as the Army Air Forces began to demobilize with the pending end of World War ii.

Rapid City AAB was again reactivated in October of 1945, and designated a permanent facility by the Army Air Force. The base briefly trained weather reconnaissance and combat squadrons using P-61 Black Widow, P-38 Lightning, P-51 Mustang, and B-25 Mitchell aircraft. The airfield was again temporarily closed from September 1946 – March 1947 for a major construction program to upgrade the temporary wartime facilities to that of a permanent base.

When operations resumed in 1947 the base was a new United States Air Force asset. The primary unit assigned to the base was the new 28th Bombardment Wing (28 BMW) flying the B-29 Superfortress.

Today, Ellsworth AFB continues to be a major active military facility and a major contributor to the economy of the Rapid City area.

The host unit at Ellsworth is the 28th Bomb Wing (28 BW) assigned to the Air Combat Command’s Twelfth Air Force. The 28 BW is one of only two B-1B Lancer strategic bomber wings in the United States Air Force, the other being the 7th Bomb Wing at Dyess AFB, Texas.

The base is named in honor of Brigadier General Richard E. Ellsworth (1911–1953), who was killed when his RB-36 Peacemaker aircraft crashed near Nut Cove, Newfoundland during a training flight.

Little Bighorn Battlefield



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at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.  
  NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


NEW Updates to the end of 2019

Aug. 10th Hardin, MT (RPIx4n)(500m)
Aug 14th Rapid City, SD (PPx14n)
Aug 29th Forest City, IA (Winnebago x5n)
Sept 3rd Cedar Rapids, IA (171m)
Sept. 17th Peoria, IL (177m)
Sept. 16th Batesville, IL (62m)
Sept. 25th Park City, KY(366m)
Oct 9th Knoxville, TN (224m)
Oct. 10th Lenoir, NC (186m)
Oct. 25th Yemassee, SC(269m)
Nov 1st Port Orange, FL (277m)
Nov. 5th Wildwood, FL (82m)
Nov. 26th Pompano, FL
Dec. 10th Christmas, FL
Dec. 16th Pompano, FL
Dec. 30th Wildwood, FL


8.12.2019-Little Battle of Little Bighorn battlefield

It was just a very short ride to the battlefield of Col Custer and Sitting Bull. This was a battle where Lt. Col George Custer was greatly outnumbered. The grounds here commemorate the valor of those involved in this battle.

8.12.2019-Custer State Park

Our visit to this battlefield, to me, was not a moving as, let’s say, Gettysburg. As always there’s always a gift shop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m not even going to try to sum up this battle, most know of it, at least. A great site to visit to refresh your memory would be

The battle of Little BigHorn

As you know Custer was very much outnumbered, possibly 10:1. Above was our host, a former history teacher, who gave us a awesome recount of all the events that took place and several locations on June 25, 1876. Below is the spot that Custer’s bother, Boston Custer, fell.

The grave marker with black facing is the spot that Custer was found after the battle. Directly in frnt of him would be his other brother Captain T. W. Custer fell during the battle.

A memorial to all who fought and died, at the battle of Little Bighorn. Below was our starting point for this experience and the spot we were enlightened by our host the history teacher, now Ranger. This would be his next to last presentation prior to his retirement from the National Park Rangers.

 

 

 

Custer State Park


 

Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
  NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


8.19.2019-Custer State Park -pictorial mostly

This is going to be mostly a car-tour of the Custer State Park. In all it will take us three hours to completely experience only two of the many routes of this park. As usual we begin with a visit to the Visitors Center.

 

This little guy is far from family. We see no other members of his herd anywhere around, but that’s somebody else’s problem. Upper right is the first of two tunnels we travel through. Absolutely no place for the coach. Rock formations abound at every turn.

Tunnel number two. This tunnel, unlike the first one, will bring us to one of the parks famous rock structures, Needle Rock, as seen below.

Being Seniors, especially seniors from Florida, we have a hard time passing up an eatery, especially one with such an awesome reputation. We’ve been told by several folks not to pass up the Purple Pie Place in the town of Custer. At this point we have not yet reached our destination, but the food was great. We enjoyed apple pie and ice cream and Carla enjoyed strawberry Rhubarb Pie.

From a distance we spotted a large group of dots on a hillside. We could only hope we would find wildlife. Yes! A herd of bison were far up on the side of the road with dozens of cars and onlookers viewing them. As we were pulling up to the herd they all decided it was time to come down from the hillside and cross the road we were on. It could not have gotten much better then this.

As if the Bison were not enough, about a mile later we came across a small group of mules enjoying the company to the visitors. Must give credit to the people who saw the bison herd, all remained either in or by their cars. A always the day does come to an end and we have a 66-mile drive back to the coach.

 

 

Hart Ranch, Rapid City, SD *****



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at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
  NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


8.14.2019-Hart Ranch history-from their Web Site

This write-up courtesy of the Hart Ranch Website

His name was John Harrison Hart, and he settled the ranch in the 1880s. It is only fitting that this land bears his name today.

Hart was straight from the pages of Old West history, and he carved out his ranching empire while Wild Bill Hickok and Calamity Jane roamed the streets of Lead and Deadwood.

There is much about him which is legend, but far more which is fact. This bull driver, Civil War fighter, scout, pioneer, and frontiersman blazed a reputation remembered even today by those who live around the ranch. The legend says he arrived in the Black Hills with only $15 in his pocket and survived the first winter by chopping wood for 75¢ a cord. The facts show his hard work, entrepreneurial skill, and innovative mind parlayed what little he had into a successful freight line from Pierre to Rapid City and Cheyenne, Wyoming.

The legend says he never learned to drive a car, even though he lived to see World War II. The fact is that you still can find people who remember driving him around his ranch when – too old to ride a horse or wagon anymore – he just couldn’t stand being away from the land he loved.

The final chapter of our story is the purchase of the 13,000 acre Hart Ranch in 1983 and the construction of the Camping Resort. In 1984 the membership was deeded the 195 acre resort. There are several companies associated with the Hart Ranch name – Hart Ranch Arena, Hart Ranch Golf Course, and Hart Ranch Development Company. The Hart Ranch Camping Resort Club is an independent and separate corporation.

John Harrison Hart came to the emerald forests and creek-carved canyons of the Black Hills during the gold rush days of the 1880s with $15 in his pocket. Tapping his entrepreneurial skills, Hart soon bought a 13,000 acre ranch for himself. But he didn’t let success get to his head. Hart was a true cowboy, driving cattle by horseback on his ranch until his death.

The Western life was all he knew, for though Hart lived to see World War II, he never learned to drive a car. Today, Hart Ranch is South Dakota’s premier recreational resort, but like John Hart, we haven’t let success give us a big head.

We may have swimming pools, hot tubs, and tennis courts, to name a few, but our greatest amenity is the simple Western lifestyle Hart Ranch has represented for over a century.

Just a short post-note to this blog. All campgrounds offer storage areas. This is a parking-lot for RVs, campers, coaches and 5th wheels. Hart Ranch has this tractor trailer truck that works all week bring the RVs that belong to families who decide to visit for a weekend or much longer. These owners notify the camp director as to when they will be arriving and the camp puts the tractor trailer to work fetching the RV from the storage lot and delivering it to a site ready for the campers for when they arrive. I guess all campgrounds do this, it’s just that with over 500 sites, the retrieval ritual is repeated all day long some days. Shortly after the campers leave to go back home or somewhere, here comes the truck to take the RV from the site and store it once again. The cost for storage of an RV is relatively cheap especially when you consider the delivery and removal services.

 

 

 

Tillamook Creamery


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

7.20.2019-Tillimook Creamery in Tillamook, OR

 

 

 

 

 

This is the Tillamook Creamery. It is located in, where else but, Tillamook, OR. Every year this museum/creamery is viewed by over 1.3-million people.

 

 

 

 

 

Everyone touring this complex will go home with a great admiration on the Tillamook attitude towards farming and cattle in particular. For us city folks we’ll learn how intense caring for cattle is on a daily basis. I lost the picture I had of a mechanical scratching wheel designed for the pleasure of the cattle they care for.

 

 

 

 

 

As you walk through this self-guided tour you will be taught the process of making cheese. This learning process is presented in pictures, kiosks and videos.
In our travels what we see, more than anything else, are farms. We both have a great deal of admiration for all those farmers who take so much pride in the areas where their cattle feed and live each day. Sadly so many times we see cattle meandering around in twelve inches of mud. It probably makes no difference in the milk they produce but in all fairness, with all the land most cattle farmers have, they should have more consideration for their animals.

 

 

 

 

 

The Tillamook Factory produces more than 170,000 pounds of cheese each day. It also produces and makes available over one-million pounds of cheese to be sold to the public each week.

Above is the Octopus. Tillamook cheese is aged in forty-pound-cubes for periods of 60 days to, as many as, five-years. Up to fifty-million pounds of cheese is stored and aged at this location on average.

 

Above is the tasting bar. Several flavors and types of Tillamook Cheese are available for consumer consumption in hopes you’ll not go home empty handed. At every venue you’ll almost always find an eatery and a gift shop. This eatery is huge offering items from burgers to ice cream to its guests.

 

 

 

 

 

Our trip here was very exciting and educational. If you’re in the area take time to visit this location.

Travel to Hardin, MT


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

8.08.2019-1st stop would be Idaho Falls, ID.
Last thing I saw last night was a caution light on the dash saying “Oil level low-Check!” It would have to wait until tomorrow morning, to dark right now. Windows open , Scooty slept through the night, Carla is sleeping like a log and here I am at 4am thinking about the oil level in the coach. Just like last night, it’s to dark to do anything else but think about the situation. To make a long story short I did find the 5W30 motor oil and we did make it to Idaho Falls, safely.

 

 

 

 

 

The sky, as you can see, was always a little threatening, but nothing came of it, at least not today. In the next picture you can see what it looks like to be homeless, as we and many others are, and enjoy the lifestyle of free stays at a Walmart.

 

8.09.2019 Next stop Butte, MT -now Bozeman, MT

 

 

 

 

 

What an early start, around 8am, rarely happens. Then we checked out the GPS and it projected we’d be in Butte around noon, give or take. 

 

With a 300-mile trip on Saturday. So we decided to extend the travel today 85-miles to Bozeman, MT.

  

 

 

 

 

 It was all highway with, once again, some very awesome sights. As we travelled West we caught a glimpse of the Rocky Mountains to our south, not to mention thousands of acres of corn, wheat and potatoes. Below, I thought, might have been a plant to convert corn to the oil for possibly fuel, but no! It was a oil distillery. They get their oil on trains from Canada to make fuel to be distributed throughout this region. Below, we often see, are these huge water falls. This picture does not do it justice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see from the picture above, the rain did finally come. Not a heavy downpour, just a constant heavy drizzle. For some reason the coach seems to love this type of weather. It moves us along with just a slight hum from the engine. It could almost put you to sleep; not good for the driver, however! We did arrive in Bozeman just minutes before 2 pm, cold not ask for anything better, considering the distance.

8.10.20`19-Sat. travel to Hardin, MT for a 4-day stay.

 

 

 

 

It was a very easy ride, almost boring, if it had not been for the awesome views along the way. It is so hard to believe that our farmers manage such big farms, and, by the way, who eats all this corn and wheat they produce.

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve seen farms that must have been over one-thousand acres of just corn alone. Wheat and hay was  produced as far as Bozeman, MT  with the assistance of vast irrigation systems. As we pushed forward, closer to Billings, MT we saw farms producing hay and wheat with no irrigation systems at all. I believe we were told that these acres were producing “dry-wheat.”

 

 

 

 

 

All they do is let it grow then cut, bail, stack and watch the next generation of wheat to come out of the ground. Livingston, MT was just before Billings. The rolling hills were awesome. Tom Brokaw has a farm here, and we think it might be for sale. As we arrived in Billings at the Petroglyphs cave we saw this sign.

 

 

 

 

 

The inducement to take this walk was this paved walkway, that would soon change.

 

 

 

 

 

We did make it to the first of the three caves. I don’t think either of us were that impressed with the pictographs; we’ve seen better. In the picture below is a cropped version of a cave painting.

 

 

 

 

Above possibly a gator or crocodile. I’ll let you decide what the picture in the upper right might depict. I see a fish in one spot. Like I said we’d seen drawings from the ancients that were much better. Definitely not his or her calling.

 

 

 

 

 

Upper left just right of center you’ll notice three black spots. Those were added in the last fifty years to indicate the level of the floor before the archeologists began tearing things apart. Many artifacts were discovered in this cave. But we have two more caves to investigate.

 

 

 

 

 

The pathway has become either gravel or crushed stone, still not bad to walk on. Upper left is our new destination. cave #2. Dead center in the picture below is where we saw the first cave. The second unimpressive cave is below right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To make this long story short the walkway to worse and we decided to pass on cave #3 and start back to the coach. You can barely make out the coach in upper right pic but it’s there, we just have to walk back on this gravel path. This was the first time we’d taken the coach to a venue, usually we get to the campground and drive back but the campground in Hardin is forty-five miles from here and we were going right by it so we coached it to this venue, possibly never again. From here were going to travel to the Grandview Camp and RVPark. Not much to brag about but, nonetheless, I gave it it’s own blog.

The Multnomah Falls


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


7.30 2019-We visit Multnomah Falls

 

 

 

 

 

Multnomah is pronounced-Malt-no-ma. Regardless of how you pronounce it over two-million people visit this venue annually. Above, to the right, is the Columbia River. Below is the visitor center, restaurant and gift shop and more importantly restrooms. Also below is a far-away shot of the falls.

 

 

 

 

 

Above is a beautiful shot of the grounds leading up to the falls. Below on the left is the new bridge that spans the falls. The left is the original bridge made of logs; not sure when it was replaced.

 

 

 

 

 

It is very difficult to see, you might have to enlarge the photo, but half way up the hill you can see individuals climbing to the top of the falls. This waterfall is the second tallest in North America at 620 feet. Number one is in the Mount Rainier area and is a two-DAY hike to visit this fall, so very few have seen it.

In the past visitors arrived here by  boat train and even a raft. There’s always a gift shop.

 

Mount Hood Ski Resort


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


7.23.2019 Field trip to Mount Hood.

The Mount Hood Ski Resort is called Timberline. It’s elevation is at 8000 feet ASL  whereas the mountain itself is at 11,235 feet ASL. It is categorized as a stratovolcano; in other words, it’s not a solid rock or a big pile of dirt. It’s formed through layers of ash and lava.

 

 

 

 

 

This picture of Carla and old Smokey was taken at the Zig Zag Ranger station, right Zig Zag, I don’t know why. As we were traveling to Mount Hood, there it was, in the middle of the road.

 

 

 

 

 

Mount Hood is a potentially “Active” volcano. It has erupted only three times in the last 1800 years and the chances of an substantial eruption in the next thirty years is negligible, but not ruled out. For all purposes it is considered to be potentially dormant. The last eruption took place about 200 years ago.Above is a picture of just a small portion of the parking for this lodge. To the right is a picture of the many ski slopes the mountain offers. Timberline is the only lodge that offers “year-round” skiing in America. The highest and longest ski trail would start at the 8000 foot elevation.

 

 

 

 

 

Indoor pictures of the lodge. Not shown in the pictures are hundreds of really healthy skiers both young and older carrying skies, sleds and snow boards. It’s enough for me to feel even older than I am.

 

 

 

 

 

Timberline is populated with apartment and condos all over the grounds. It’s a playground for the rich. As we were checking out our purchases a group of youngsters were paying cash for their items and they had more hundreds and fifties in their wallets than I could count.

 

 

 

 

 

From this elevation you can see forever almost. We missed the first set of waterfalls but caught the second group. Below are just a couple of shots of how beautiful this area is. Not sure when we’ll be back, but for sure we will return for a longer stay next time.

 

 

Mount Angel Abbey*


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


 

 

7.25.2019-Thursday-Abbey

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We’re off today to experience Mount Angel Abbey. The property it sits on is mostly a butte. As we have discussed in the past; a butte is a hill, both small and tall, made up of dirt, stone and in this area, a combination of volcanic ash and/or magma from thousands of years ago. We begin our tour at the first building on the property, the Press. It is here that the monks legally print documents or reprint books or booklets of interest to the seminary. Below Carla is asking the best way to view all the buildings. to the right is a shot of inside the Press Building.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the pictures above are two dormitory buildings. There is an option to attend, for a while, either on or off campus. If the grounds look awesome, almost as perfect as you would see at Disney, it’s probably through the assistance of the seminary students, the beer they brew and sell, the Coffee House of course and the tuition they charge to attend the seminary. Annual tuition, including room and board, runs a little over $36,000 per year. So, a four-year stay could be as high as $150,000. That’s much cheaper than going to Pharmacy School. At Mass. College of Pharmacy tuition, without room and board, is running over $50,000/year. Below are two more dorm buildings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above left, I believe, is the Chapel, on the left and school building on the right. Our next stop for those building we can enter is the College Museum. If this is all we saw it would have been well worth the one-hour ride here. Below right is a replica of the “Crown of Thorns” that Jesus had to endure. I said replica. The Crucifixion was over 2000 years ago but the bramble bushes having these thorns thrive in the area of Mount Golgotha in Jerusalem, where Our Lord was crucified.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above left, once again, the museum. to the right is the Seminary Chapel. The architecture of the chapel is Romanesque. Below right is the chapel Organ. It’s a Martin Ott Pipe Organ in the choir loft featuring 2478 pipes. Below left is the entrance to the chapel.

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In the foreground just to the left of the alter is another smaller organ. Also noteworthy is the seating configuration in the church. Very similar to what you might find in many of the English Churches and especially Cathedrals. I believe these are Choir Pews. Above right is the seminary library; awesome in size and décor. Above is about all we were permitted to experience. Below right is the walk-way to the Coffee-house, brewery and hundreds of acres of farmlands used to grow hops and almost all the other herbs needed for their beer.

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It would take several pictures to show off the many acres and variety of products grown on this property. Above right is the Coffee-House. They offer many unique beers, produced on the property and a short, simple menu to nimble on while enjoying your brew. Below is the inside of the Coffee-House and an Historic picture of the devastating fire that destroyed every building on the campus. It took over eighteen-months before classes would be held on the school grounds. I think this took place in 1926 or there about.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below left is a peek of the distillery. The staff here were so awesome. Very informative and once lived in the vicinity from where we came from.

 

 

 

 

 

The ride home, in Oregon, is always a pleasant experience.

 

29th Wedding Anniversary


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


mm
7.14.2019- Anniversary Dinner 29

 

Yes, I remembered! Unlike those that are encased in a stick and stone building, we cannot indulge in frivolous, but relevant, gifts. We settle for a better than average dinner and the, all important, anniversary cards. We decided to try the Riverhouse Diner in Pacific City. You must remember Pacific City is a village, actually a fishing village. We both indulged in a Calamari meal in a excellent sauce. Carla had a pannacotta desert and I played it safe with a Cheesecake dish. The restaurant was small, but once again Pacific City is small.

I counted tables and chairs and could only come up with seating for twenty-four, but that’s alright, I like small. In this picture is about half the dining room.

 

 

From the exterior it isn’t that impressive but the food was very good. The calamari was a little on the salty side but good nonetheless.

 

 

 

This is the river it borders. Throughout the meal we saw this young family kayaking up and down in front of the restaurant, very relaxing.  

Haystack Rock, Pacific City, OR*


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


 

 

7.12.2019-Cape Kiwanda or Haystack Rock

This is the beach in Pacific City. It’s known as Cape Kiwanda.

 

 

 

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What the beach is really known for is the rock that sits within site of the beach area. This looks like just another rock sitting in the water but this rock is over one mile off the coast. On top of that it’s well over three-hundred feet in height.

 

 

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This is a view of this beach town from the road approaching the beach. So much like Cape Cod.

 

 

 

 

Above, thanks to cropping, is a sand surfer. this is a very big mound of sand and must be steep enough to use it as

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Below is a boat. More specifically it’s a “Dory.” The Dory is configured to make it a boat which can handle the strong surf this beach has year-round.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.12.2019-Pacific City, OR-

The biggest store in town was Chester’s’, about the size of a Walgreen Drug Store. I’m not knocking it. With what they’re charging the Chester’s are doing quite well. Corn at Walmart 5-for $2,00. Chester’s was having a special, 80-cents an ear down this week from $1.25 an ear last week. Doesn’t that inspire you to buy a 5-acre mini-farm and supply Chester’s every week! Below are pictures of the Pacific City Beach Area.

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South Beach Fish Market*


Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

 

TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)

Aug. 7th  Butte, MT
Aug 10th Billings, MT
Aug.12th Wyoming somewhere find  RVP
Aug 14th Rapid City, SD
Aug 29th Forest City, IA


06.23.19-Sunday-South Beach Fish Market

Sundays are very much like Saturdays. The script has been reenacted on so many Sundays in our past, very much like many other families. A little shopping at Walmart then munch our way through the day with a nice but simple dinner to end the evening. Today was very much like all the Sundays of our past with a little twist at the end of the day. As I’ve mentioned a few times the last couple of weeks, we’re not exactly in the heart of Newport. In Newport is where you can easily find Wi-Fi and, most of all, cell phone availability. No, we’re about eight miles south of Newport over where many of the well know beaches can be found, like South Beach and Nye Beach. Today, however, we’re facing a count-down to Wednesday morning when we will depart this area and go to Pacific City. We’ve mentioned in the past we adhere, as much as possible, to a very simple and inexpensive lifestyle, but occasionally you have to do something different.

On each trip into town we travel past the South Beach Fish Market, I actually thought the name of the place was the Crab House do the outdoor billboards on the building. So today we decided to experience this roadside fish eatery. There are people waiting to enter all day long, so after a couple of games of Kings Corner we left the coach around 4pm to go eat. We no sooner got to the Ocean Highway didn’t the car begin  to handle funny, something was wrong. I got out and sure enough we had another flat. This was the second flat in two weeks. My brother Dennis, as he does each year, renews his and our membership to AAA. We hadn’t had the last flat fixed so now we had to rely on the donut tire. AAA estimated a one-hour wait and as promised he arrived in one hour. He had us up and going in twenty minutes.

The next stop would be the Fish Market. This is one of those eateries visible to everyone but whose reputation is best know to only the locals. It’s not very impressive, but what a menu. All the fish is fresh. Halibut, Shrimp, Chinook King Salmon, Prawns, Scallops, Tuna and Wild Fish, served in so many combinations you must allow an extra twenty minutes time to study the menu. Carla enjoyed Halibut and Scallops, which I help her eat and I partook of Calamari and Onion Rings. Our meals were awesome. Torty minutes later we were slowly driving our crippled car back to the campground. Needless to say, tires will be our primary objective tomorrow morning especially since we’re leaving on Wednesday.

 

Newport, OR (Waterfront)*


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

TRAVEL ITENERARY

May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)

Aug. 7th  Butte, MT
Aug 10th Billings, MT
Aug.12th Wyoming somewhere find  RVP
Aug 14th Rapid City, SD
Aug 29th Forest City, IA


6.21.2019- Newport, OR

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Newport is the largest city on the Central Oregon Coast with its remarkable history and rich cultural heritage.

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Newport was originally inhabited by the Yacona Indians who had lived in the region for at least three thousand years before the arrival of the first Euro-American settlers. During the establishment of the Siletz Reservation in 1855, Yacona Indians were relocated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many of these pictures have been posted to give our Abby some additional food for thought.

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This Historic Downtown is so comfortable. For me it takes first place for us to settle down to when the time comes for us getting off the road and hanging up the keys..

The 19th-century is a period when people who migrated from the different parts of the world discovered that Newport was a great destination for their businesses and prosperity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The picture upper right is about a slightly curved piece of glass with a slit in the upper portion to insert a picture for viewing. Does anyone print out pictures anymore? Maybe that’s why these have been discounted 50% from $60 to around $30 each.
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This is a resident kitten that’s a rescue cat. It took a lot for me to not bring it home with us. Although I don’t think the person holding the kitten would let it go.

In 1852, the schooner Juliet was stranded by storms on the Central Oregon Coast. Its captain and crew explored the bay and river and discovered oyster beds in Yaquina Bay. This great discovery and demand for oysters brought entrepreneurs and new settlers to the region. In 1863, two oyster companies were opened.

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Above left are a string of glass blowing kilns. They hold classes for those who might want to learn the trade.

.In 1866, a former soldier, Sam Case built the first hotel in Newport at the northwest of the Yaquina Bay to help accommodate the greater number of tourists. The building was named Ocean House after one of the best hotels in Newport in Rhode Island.

(The bold and italics’ text has been taken from: PDX History-The Oregon Encyclopedia)

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Had a chance to speak to the fisherman on this boat. Turns out the only reason he fishes is to keep his cat fed every day. He was fishing with no bait, and surprisingly, before we left him, he had caught a baby salmon.

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Sam Case continued with his mission of building houses and cottages. Later, on July 1868, he established the first post office where he became the first Newport postmaster. In 1868, the town was named Newport after a town in Rhode Island.

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The picture below right of the bridge leading into the historic district was, once again, for Abby to appreciate. Her art is centered around geometric shapes and patterns and I thought she’d get something from it.

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The picture lower right is weaving scarfs. She was nice enough to spend time with me explaining that she took a ten-week course in college to learn how to do this trade with many types of materials. Carla then came along and she had questions for her as well. So talented. These scarfs sell for sixty dollars each. Below left is a picture for the MacDougall’s our extended family. It’s a trade he’s been very involved with for several years now.

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More pictures and items for Abby’s sake. I would bet she and Michael would fit in just fine in Newport.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pictures below are those taken on our way into Newport. Out of order, I know, still trying to get a handle on the coding.


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Upper right; Carla is starting to get pretty corky on her picture taking abilities.

 

Sisters Rodeo*



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
  NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

6.09.19-Sisters Rodeo

The italicized text is from the Sisters Website
What a beautiful day. Temps around 80 degrees. I only hope I can sort out the important and entertaining pictures on the Rodeo experience. Strangely it was exactly three-years ago to the weekend that we attended our first rodeo, the Cody Rodeo in Wyoming.

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Announcers: Curt Robinson & Wayne Brooks
Bullfighters: Danny Newman, Ryan Manning & Logan Blasdell
Rodeo Clown: J.J. Harrison
Specialty Act: One-Armed Bandit

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As it should be, a Rodeo is about fun, excitement and, of course, the kids.

Many attending were father/daughter and father/son days together.

The Darlings of the Rodeo opened the event.

In the era when life still moved slowly enough for daydreams, and neighbors visited each other on front porches, cowboys competed in the first Sisters Rodeo. These cowboys, both amateurs and professionals, wore cloth squares hand painted with numbers pinned to their backs and waited for their events. Because the small-town rodeo offered purses of $500, equal to Pendleton and Cheyenne, the cowboys tagged Sisters Rodeo “The Biggest Little Show in the World.” The year was 1940.Local couples had pooled $10,000 to produce the rodeo east of town on land next to the site that became Sisters Airport. Two years later, they purchased land on the west end of town and held rodeos there for the next thirty-four years.

Except for the announcer and the stock suppliers, the rodeo was an all-volunteer production, a tradition that has not changed.

The afternoon began with the “cowboy having to saddle a Wild Horse.” None of the cowboys made it. Final score Horse 1 cowboys 0.

The Hitchcock Mill, north of Sisters, donated timber that was milled by rodeo volunteers and used to build the arena and a few stands. Ellis Edgington’s Buckaroo Breakfast was initiated, with pan-fried bread and wild buffalo meat. Twelve years later, wild buffalo herds were so diminished that this part of the tradition ended in 1953.

The rodeo attracted the best in the business from the beginning. Mel Lambert, one of the first inductees in the National Cowboy Hall of Fame, announced at Sisters for nine years. World Champion cowboys competed every year, and the rodeo’s reputation grew. The stock came from local ranches, the McCoin Ranch in Terrebonne and Henry Durfee’s cattle ranch in Redmond.

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And once again, it’s about the kids. Here they participate in a dance routine with the Rodeo Clowns.

Rodeo Queens in the first years were chosen from a selected group of princesses who competed for the prize by selling raffle tickets for a steer. The young woman who sold the most tickets was declared the queen. Mary Saxon of Terrebonne held that first title. Over many years and a few hazardous escapes of steers, this selection evolved to a competition of horsemanship, speaking ability and presentation.From 1956 through 1960, Sisters Rodeo was an amateur event sponsored by Veterans of Foreign Wars. Their profit built a small theater in the night-life-starved town, but dwindling interest in amateur rodeo led the VFW to step aside after five years. It appeared that Sisters Rodeo had sent its last cowboy out of the bucking chute.

A legendary pick-up rider and competitor, Pat Fisk, produced the rodeo at a loss the next year because he “hated to see the rodeo die.”

Salvation came in the form of Mert Hunking, a cowboy “born with rodeo in his blood.” Hunking and a one-year partner ramrodded the rodeo in 1962. Then the Hunkings produced the show on their own: Mert as arena director and organizer, and his wife, Martha, in charge of tickets, concessions and the Buckaroo Breakfast.

In 1963, the rodeo reorganized with Hunking, Clifford Ray, Fred Ferrian and Homer Shaw as the officers of the new association. The stock was supplied by Son Bain of Redmond and Christianson Brothers Rodeo Stock Company. With this quality of rodeo stock, the best of national rodeo cowboys made Sisters part of their circuit to compete with local amateur cowboys.

In Pink, one of the contesters. His uncle, lower pic. in sunglasses, attends for his father.

Hunking, Richard Rollins and Jerry Kosh formed Sombrero Stock Company in 1971, which supplied consistently fine rodeo stock until 1988, setting a pattern of excellence which fans came to expect.

Still, the rodeo had problems, especially with new government regulations. Outhouses were in need of replacement. The fire marshal wanted overhead sprinklers installed. The weather was always unpredictable, often reducing spectator numbers. The inventive rodeo board responded to the challenges as well as they could: they brought hundreds of feet of hoses from their homes for fire safety, revamped the outhouses and even had to pump the grounds through the night to continue rodeo the next day after a flood in one of those year.

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The dude in the Red shirt in both pictures is unique; he’s called a One-Armed Bandit. He was once in the Rodeo but now trains horses, even with one arm.

By the mid-1970’s, the obstacles seemed too great and the income too low. The rodeo grounds were sold, yet; local citizens did not want to see their rodeo disappear. They held a meeting for “anybody who has a horse or interest in the rodeo,” resulting in another reorganization with Homer Shaw as president.

In 1977, the rodeo was held on Hunking land east of town (behind the elementary school) with borrowed bleachers and temporary fences. For the next two years, it was on the Topping Ranch on Harrington Loop (west of the current site). The structures (fences and bleachers) continued to be borrowed or rented and were hauled by members from as far away as the Willamette Valley, only to be returned after that year’s rodeo.

The events included

bull and bronco riding,

calf roping, bulldogging,

wild cow milking and wild horse races.

South Beach in Newport, OR*


Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)
Time to travel East


6.16.19-South Beach

South Beach is just down the road a few miles heading towards Newport. This is one of those pictorial blogs. It’s a beach. We came, we saw and it was very windy and chilly.
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So windy and chilly so we left.


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Whaler’s Rest-Newport, OR(TT)*



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING,
you need. 
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)
Time to travel East

*************************

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 We actually arrived here yesterday, the 14th. It was a very short uneventful ride of less than one-hundred miles. Nothing any bigger than a two-lane undivided highway and, at times, a country road. This is a pretty good size campground, not so much as number of sites but how big it is. The big attraction here is across the street; the Pacific Ocean. You can see it in the picture below. Below is also the town of Newport. It’s a typical small coastal town, like Mystic or New London, CT
 

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Another look at the ocean. We’re just now crossing over the bridge that will bring us into Newport. As a person who still has a love for boating this marina is awesome. Below, once again, crossing the bridge.
 

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This is another Thousand Trails RV Campground and it’s a first come- first serve basis as far as choosing a site. They’ve gotten very organized. Our primary objective is Wi-Fi and Satellite for Dish, we got both.  They actually gave us a print-out of each site designating which had line of sight satellite with either carry-out or roof-mount availability; awesome! Why can’t they all offer that convenience. The last time we were here Wi-Fi was a zero except for directly inside the camp buildings. Verizon, on the other hand, does not exist here, at least not at this time. No phone service at all. If you catch a break it’s very broken up and not worth the effort. 
 


 Today the 15th and yes, Father’s Day, and I won’t go any further on that. We were getting antsy and needed some exercise so I suggested taking a walk to the ocean. It’s not far, about a half mile, half of it on a small windy trail to the ocean, but we did it.


 Today is very cool and breezy around 53 deg., unlike Boca at 85,  and Greenfield, MA t 64.  The wind is very strong but it does feel good. Once again, unlike New London, CT you just don’t get that strong mist of “salt-air,” I miss that sensation.


 We hung out at the ocean for about twenty minutes and decided we’d had enough so it’s time to go back to the camp.


 Below is the camp game-rooms.


 Today, being Father’s Day, all the dads were being treated to a free hot dog. It’s free so we stayed and each had a dog. Just prior to the dog we chose a DVD for this evening viewing, since we have no Verizon connection, and chose Skyscraper. Haven’t seen it before, most likely a B movie. About half way home I noticed I had my camera and soda but no DVD. Went back and looked around. I distinctly remember putting it on the table when we ate, but got the table mixed up with the table we went to, to get our dogs. Got to give RVers a little credit. Thirty minutes after leaving it on the wrong table, it was still there, and Carla retrieved it, Thank-You Lord!

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Oregon Observatory*



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)
Time to travel East

*****************************************

The following text is from the Oregon Observatory Website.

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This small building was not what I was expecting. I thought we’d have to drive up to the top of a mountain then look into a many ton telescope, but no, not here. It’s personal. Workers and volunteers abound everywhere. Below, a view of the sun in mid-day, is exactly what you see in the “white telescope” you see a couple of pictures down.

The Oregon Observatory. Billions and billions of sights to see. When our roofs disappear we have the largest collection of telescopes for public viewing in the United States. Feast your eyes on faraway galaxies.

Brian, seen below talking to Carla, and an older gentleman Bill were so helpful in tutoring us on the use of their telescopes.

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Witness a meteor shower. Get a glimpse of globular clusters, nebulae and deep space binary stars, as well as our closest star, the Sun. There’s no better place than the Oregon Observatory at Sunriver.

The white telescope below is not outrageously expensive; around a couple of thousand dollars and the computer that locates the individual stars will cost you about six-hundred dollars.

All these telescopes plus another dozen in the back of the building are is use on Wednesday and Saturday evening for as many as two-hundred to as many as four-hundred guests to use. We visited during the day and returned in the evening to experience the telescopes. The roof on the building actually slide to the back exposing all these scopes to the open skies. If it wasn’t for the extreme cooler temperatures, around 55, it would have been a perfect day.

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Sunriver’s elevation, pitch-dark surroundings, and crystal clear air make it perfect for stargazing. At the Oregon Observatory, you won’t be lining up just for one quick peek. We have many of our telescopes set up for your enjoyment, from Tele Vue refractors to our 30-inch Newtonian. So if you really want to see the sights of Bend and Central Oregon, then we want to see you at the Oregon Observatory. Astronomy and rocketry conveniently located in Oregon’s most popular destination resort, adjacent to the Sunriver Nature Center.

Above is the dead trunk of a “dead tree,” but it’s only dead if it does not contribute to the environment. The, so-called dead tree trunk is called a “snag.” Wood-peckers and a variety of other birds will adopt this tree for their sustenance. They will knock themselves out pecking away on the wood and even find foods in the form of bugs and insects to eat.  In other words it’s either this tree trunk or the wood siding of your home.

All of this made possible by our supporters and friends. All telescopes, equipment and buildings made possible by generous donations. (The italics texts is courtesy of the Oregon Observatory Web Site.)

The amphitheater above is used to instruct audiences of all ages on the many constellations of our universe.

6.05.19-Oregon Observatory
This day began cool and got slightly cooler. A few days ago we dropped by the observatory and were greatly impressed. We will go back to the Observatory this evening, and it will be cold. The temp will not go above 55 degrees.

 

Mount Newberry Experience*



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING,
 you need,
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING!

6.10.19-Mount Newberry Experience
Mount Newberry is about thirty-miles down the road. I thought it would be a one-topic venue but discovered that we enjoyed the Paulina Lakes, the East Lake, Paulina Falls and finally Obsidian Peak.

Paulina Lake

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Once again we see the specter of this mountain range. This time were at a roadside viewing point. For the first time we also have the names of these mountains. The Sister Mountains, back in the 1800’s were once know as Faith, Hope and Charity. Bachelor, extreme left, appears to tower over the others, but in actuality it’s only just over nine-thousand feet. Two of the Sister mountains are over eleven thousand feet. The area on the topographical rendering is about the size of Rhode Island. This entire area was covered with lava rock from twelve to five-hundred feet deep.

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In the center of the picture above is the result of its blowing its top. Center of picture is Mount Newberry. When the incident happened it spread lava all over up to thirty miles away. Where Carla’s finger is, at the top of the picture is Sunriver, the town we are camping in. Once again, Center picture are those two blue areas. Right now we’re visiting the pool of water on the left, Paulina Lake. Below are pictures of this area.

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Above is a blow-up of the top of Mount Newberry. It took thousands of years but after the initial blow-up the insides of the volcano actually fell into itself. This formed a “Caldera.” This is very similar to what happened to the Volcano involved with Crater Lake. In the case of Newberry we got two lakes, one a little higher than the other.

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The mountains above have no relation to what were to see today. Mount Newberry is our challenge for today. It was back about 30,000 years ago that Newberry began to grow. And grow it did, reaching over 12,000 feet at one time. Then around 10,000 years ago, as one youngster put it, it blew its top.

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Above is Obsidian Peak. You cannot drive to the top but there is a trail you can hike to it. Below is the Paulina Lake Lodge, closed at this time.

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Below another picture of the Lodge and above you find a Telephone Booth. When did you ever see one of these.

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Now we’re off to experience East Lake, the blue body of water in the picture at the top of the blog.

East Lake:

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Now were off to Obsidian Rock:

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. This is a special type of lava flow. Below the path isn’t great but I have a feeling it won’t last.

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 This is a section of the flow. The depth here is about 200 feet. (Below) This is what I was afraid of. Not only is it very rough and laden with outcroppings of rocks, it’s going up, I mean very high up.

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Need I say we’re still going up and I see no smooth super highway ahead. Below is a BIG example of Obsidian Rock. This type of rock, if you look closely is almost “glass-like.” In fact it is glass. Commercial glass is 99.7% pure silica (sand). The rock in the picture below is 77% silica but still qualifies it as being glass.

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I’m tired and ready to leave but we have one more stop. Above we saw a picture of Obsidian Rock. Below is a picture of the mountain we were walking around and it is a solid piece of Obsidian Rock about thirty-thousand years old.

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Paulina Falls:.

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We decided to put off viewing the lower point of the Paulina Falls until just before we leave. Here goe the National Park Service enticing us with this wide flat walk-way, I wonder what really lies ahead.

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The walkway did not disappoint, it actually got better and above is what we saw all the way up to the falls. Yes I said UP! Below  are the falls and it was well worth the uphill climb.
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Remember what a Caldera is? This is when a volcano goes dormant and in ten or twenty thousand years the sides of the top of the volcano slowly begin to fall into  itself forming a “bowl” or in the official language a “Caldera.” Remember this is the volcano that spilled lava over an area of Oregon the size of Rhode Island.

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Some of the beautiful natural views in this National Park.

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Now we’re working are way down from the falls to view them from below, like they’ll look that much more different.

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Above we’re looking DOWN the rough rocky barely visible trail and stopped to decide will it really be worth traversing this path. Below we decide not to pursue the journey and take everybody’s word on the fact that it’s a beautiful site. We’re older, NOT OLD, and we know it. No need to take chances, we do enough of that on a regular basis.

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Ah! the parking lot. I could go for a beer. A very nice day for sure.

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Crater Lake

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

 


TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)
Time to travel East

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5.23.19-Visiting the Crater Lake venue was awesome. Our tip can be set up into three divisions. This is almost June!

Tripping to the Lake

Experiencing the lake

and the Fossilized Steam venue.

Just one of the many mountain views we experienced on our trip to Crater Lake.

A Cherished History

Crater Lake National Park is a place where you can experience diverse wilderness in a setting of breathtaking beauty. More than 7,000 years ago, a fierce eruption shook the 12,000-foot-tall Mount Mazama, triggering the mountain’s collapse. The area’s Klamath tribes witnessed the volcano’s eruption, and their histories include many stories about how Crater Lake and its features were created. 

This is a picture of Mount Thielsen.

 

 

 

In the hundreds of years after the eruption, rainfall and snowfall filled the crater and formed the lake. No streams run into or out of the lake – its levels depend entirely on precipitation, evaporation, and seepage. At nearly 2,000 feet, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States. That depth, combined with the water’s purity, gives the lake its remarkable deep blue color.

 

This is now what the top of Mount Mazama looks like today.

Above is the Welcoming Sign to Crater Lake National Park. Below is an Information Kiosk and, more importantly, behind it an outhouse.

As you can see snow is beginning to show itself on both sides of the road.

The entrance to Crater Lake National Park.

Above and below is the Administration Building. I wonder if they ever call a no-work day because the snow has buried the entrance?

The Visitor Information Center and, of course, Gift Shop. In this building we bought a couple of items and waited patiently for twenty-five minutes for the next showing of a movie on CL.

This is what the top of Mount Mazama looks like today. Before Mount Mazama blew its top it was over 12,000 feet ASL

On May 22, 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt signed the legislation that created the sixth national park in the United States, Crater Lake National Park. When you visit today, you can explore the fascinating volcanic features that date back to the lake’s formation.

This text was taken from the Crater Lake Website,

courtesy of the National Park Service.

In the early 1930’s the Crater Lake region received over seventy feet of snow. On average it usually gets around forty-four feet of snow.

Yup, I dared myself to stand upon a short stone wall to take this picture. To my right and left are signs stating “Stay-back.” On the lake side of the stone wall is snow, very slippery snow on a steep hill going into the lake. If you survived you might be in trouble with the law since no one is permitted to take a swim in this lake. Like would anyone be thinking of that as they were sliding down into the lake.

Yes! Here’s that wall that no one is supposed to breach.

 

In the center is Wizard Island. Elevation of the volcano, yes volcano. is 6940 feet ASL. This is a volcano within a volcano. As you have read the entirety of Crater Lake sits in a volcano. Below is a nothing picture of a car with Massachusetts plates carrying two bikes and a snow shovel, just in case.

 

Above behind the sign saying “road closed” are some very tiny people in relation to the height of the snow bank. Now, we’ve left the proximity of the Lake and traveled a short distance to the Rim Village Café and Gift Shop. For a change we had a bite to eat this time. Carla enjoyed a bowl of Minestrone soup and I a hot dog. Hindsight being I should have gone with the soup. Below are some of the picture from this two-story building.

Two ways to look at this! Either Carla is really short or that there’s a heck of a lot of snow behind her. Below we met an awesome couple Berry and Roberta Mullin. Not full-timers but they do travel in a Vistabule Teardrop Trailer. Below their picture is a picture of the Vestibule Trailer they have.

 

 

We’re both a little tired and it’s about 3pm, Scoots will be looking for her 5pm feeding shortly. We were not that far away from the lake when we happened across the Fossilized Steam Venue.

 

 

Who needs a telephoto lens when you can crop! Center of picture is a thousands year old fossilized steam structure. 

 

 

Family History Library

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.
HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

 

 

May / June ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
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5.09.19-Family History Library

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.To find ourselves in this building was the main purpose for the trip.


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Basically we came here to uncover some additional information on my father Leo Grenier as related to his military service. Below is a picture of him in his younger days. Sadly, isn’t it, that we finally get the urge to learn more at such a late date. Handsome dude, not sure what happened to me. It did not take long to get hooked.

He looks so much like my brothers Richard and Dennis. Guess I took after my mother’s side of the family. This is the only really good younger image of my father I have. Lots of family pictures, but he was almost always on the wrong side of the lens.
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.Above this beautiful artwork of Jesus preaching to the multitudes. All the people, both young and old, were so thoughtful, polite and helpful. As part of their religious obligations they are asked to volunteer eighteen months to the cause of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church. None of them, young or old, hesitate to graciously speak about their religion and its teachings. It’s very nice and comforting to see so many so strongly routed in their religion. I could never be converted, but if I were not committed to Catholicism this might get some attention from me. Below Sister I Forgot Name, begins to help us dig into my father’s past, and teach us how to work their program.


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.We’re on the forth floor. Each floor is designated for different areas of data search. The floors below us and one above all look like this.


.Sister will leave us after about 45 minutes and a twenty something stepped in to help. He worked feverishly trying to collect the data we were looking for on my father, and finally put it all together. Data entry should be an exacting field, but don’t kid yourself. I’d always seen my father refer to himself as Leo Grenier, when in actuality we discovered that the Canadians have a tendency, at least in the past, to give the name Joseph to all the boys and Mary to the girls. So his official name, as far as data searching goes turned out to be “J Leo Oscar Grenier.” Who would have known!

Above, not seen to clearly, are older men in many locations on the floor, unabashedly talking and explaining the Adventist Religion. I could never be converted but I only wish I had the same grasp on my Catholic faith as I see in these individuals. Maybe I’m just not hanging out in the right places.

Experience Petroglyphs ???

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING.

March/April ITENERARY

May 2nd Green River, UT at Shady Acres x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 layovers) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (layovers TBD) x7n (654m)
June 5th Newport, OR at Whaler’s Rest
June 26th leave Newport, OR
*****************************************

May 4th- Experience Petroglyphs ???

Hope I peeked your interest. pet·ro·glyph, NOUN  are rock carvings, especially prehistoric ones. For more information on this read the May 4th Blog on it.

23 April, 2014 – 23:26 aprilholloway

The haunting rock art of Sego Canyon – extra-terrestrials or spiritual visions? 

The sandstone cliffs of Sego Canyon are a spectacular outdoor art gallery of petroglyphs painted and carved by Native Americans peoples over a period of around 8,000 years.  They are characterised by more than 80 imposing and haunting life-sized figures with hollowed eyes or missing eyes and the frequent absence of arms and legs. Some claim that the mysterious figures are evidence of alien visitation in our ancient past, while scholars maintain that the strange beings represent shamanistic visions produced in trance-like states.

Above are four Mesas. In about a half hour or so we will be driving down a road in-between mesas two and three. Below is that road. It feels and looks like no one has been here in years.

Evidence of human habitation in Sego Canyon dates back to the Archaic Period (6,000 – 100 BC).  But subsequent Anasazi, Fremont, and Ute tribes also left their mark upon the area, painting and chipping their religious visions, clan symbols, and records of events into the cliff walls.

 Below is the only wild-life, a young calf, we’ve come across in the last two weeks.

The rock art of Sego Canyon can be characterised according to a number of distinctive styles, and time periods.  The oldest art belongs to the Archaic period and dates to between 6,000 BC and 2,000 BC.  Some of the most spectacular examples of rock art in the Southwest are attributed to Archaic people. They were nomads, who hunted large and small game animals, and collected and processed wild plants. They did not build permanent habitation structures, but lived in caves and in small brush shelters built in the open.

Above the road does not get any better. Below is the reason for our being here.

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Within the Archaic period and beginning around 4,000 years ago, we see the Barrier Canyon Style rock art, a distinctive style of art which appears mostly in Utah, with the largest concentration of sites in and around the San Rafael Swell and Canyonlands National Park, but the full range extends into much of the state and western Colorado. Barrier Canyon Style rock art panels are mostly pictographs (painted) but there are also several petroglyphs (pecked) in the style.

Above is our looking back. We appear to be going downhill. For this reason, I’ve deduced, the Fremont peoples lived with a source of water. Back a couple of thousand years ago this area might have been totally flooded and this could have been a fairly deep lake, a good source of fish. Once we get closer to our objective our path becomes very primitive.

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Fremont petroglyphs in Sego Canyon. Photo source .

Beginning 1300 AD and lasting until 1880 AD, the Ute people inhabited the region of Sego Canyon and carved their own style on the cliff faces. Prior to the arrival of Mexican settlers, the Utes occupied significant portions of what are today eastern Utah, western Colorado, and parts of New Mexico and Wyoming.

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The Utes were never a unified group within historic times; instead, they consisted of numerous nomadic bands that maintained close associations with other neighbouring groups. The historic Ute rock art is identified and dated by the horse and rider figures.

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Above and below are the reasons for our visiting this venue.

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Horses were introduced to North America by the Spanish in the sixteenth century. Other figures, or elements, painted in red and white on the panel include a white bison, a human figure with leggings, several large human figures, and large circles believed to be shields. The Ute people lived freely throughout western Colorado and eastern Utah until about 1880, when they were forced onto reservations.

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Extra-terrestrials or spiritual visions?

Advocates of the ancient astronaut theory suggest that the strange figures of the Barrier Canyon style rock art depict extra-terrestrials that once visited Earth. They point to the large, hollow looking eyes and the triangular shaped heads as evidence that the figures were not human.  However, others, like researcher Polly Schaafsma (1999) say that they represent shamanistic art associated with ritual activities of the Archaic people. Ms Schaafsma points to the fact that the ‘spirit figures’ are frequently shown holding snake forms, and their torsos sometimes incorporate water/life-giving symbols. The presence of these types of relational (figure/animal) motifs is considered to be evidence that there was a shamanistic tradition alive, at least during a certain period of time, among these Western Archaic people.  So what accounts for the unusual features, such as strange eyes, legless bodies, and what appears to be wings?

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A close-up thanks for cropping.

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According to Ms Schaafsma, shamanic practitioners, with the assistance of various spirits, were said to have the ability to travel to celestial realms and the underworld, in order to communicate with ‘purveyors of power’.  Hallucinations and visionary experiences characterise the shamanic trance experience, often provoked by the use of hallucinogens.

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Ute rock art, 1300 AD. Photo source

“With the aid of spirit helpers, tutelary deities, and divine or semi-divine beings, these otherworldly voyagers contact ancestral and supernatural powers in the interests of curing, fertility, divining, successful hunting, battle exploits, and weather control,” she wrote in a paper on the symbology of the Barrier Canyon rock art.

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Universally, shamans have communicated their extraordinary experiences through art. Are the Sego Canyon pictographs and petroglyphs another example of this?  No one really knows for sure what the images represent or why they were painted. The god-like, imposing and fantastical figures etched onto the cliffs of Sego Canyon remain an enigma and the true meaning behind them may never be unlocked.

Featured image: Petroglyphs in Sego Canyon. Photo source .

By April Holloway

References

Sego Canyon Petroglyphs – Science Views

Trance and Transformation in the Canyons – by Polly Schaafsma

The Barrier Canyon Rock Art Style – by David Sucec

Traces of a Lost People – Smithsonian

Barrier Canyon Style Rock Art – by James Q. Jacobs

 

 

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>Columns seen at the bottom of the picture are Hoodoos.BLUE

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Dennis’ B’day & Arches Nat’l Park

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.
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HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

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MAY-JUNE ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at Shady Acres x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 layovers) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (layovers TBD) x7n (654m)
June 5th Newport, OR at Whaler’s Rest
June 26th leave Newport, OR
*****************************************

5.03.19- Dennis’ Birthday-Arches

Yes, Dennis’ birthday. No! We did not forget. He did receive our presents in time and enjoyed both cake and pie during his special day. For us we got an early start and travelled an hour to experience Arches Canyon. We did and were so very impressed we the experience.

By 9:30, after congratulating Dennis, it was off to Arches..

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The full purpose of the picture below is for the reader to appreciate the awesome height of these mountainous size in relation to the car in the picture as well.


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.In the picture above is a view of the half-mile roadway to get to the entrance to the park. This is the Park Avenue Trail. As we have seen this year and years past the National Park Service does an super jog of making so many of these monuments so accessible.
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I have over three-hundred pictures of mountainous structures we’d seen on this visit..


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Below is our first “arch” structure. (Center of picture).
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Balanced Rock coming up.
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.Below another arch, in the center of picture. This blog is basically a pictorial on Arches, so they will get redundant eventually.
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Both up and down are more arches. Can you find the arch in the picture below?.
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Arches, Arches everywhere.
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It was a good walk but the sight was well worth it, not to mention the beautiful parkway, thanks to the NPS..
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. Three-hundred-million years ago this area, as well as most of the country, was covered with over ten-thousand feet of water, snow, ice and when it all began to melt, a million years later the friction of the water flowing past the sandstone structures took on very beautiful designs. Over the course of the three-hundred-million years the deep waters andice came back many, many times...

Below Delicate Arch coming up..
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.Delicate Arch was just to long a hike so we chose to present a picture in place of the real thing..

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.Once again I must rely on the poor-man’s telephoto lens, the cropping option. Below, we’ve reached the end of the Arch parade, at least for us. One more awesome site coming up.

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..Fiery Furnace coming up! This is going to be a pretty good size walk, only hope the vision is worth it. You noticed the walk begins by negotiating a series of stone steps leading to an original walkway, not the kind the NPS provides..

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The tall narrow rock structures are called “fins.”

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Devils Garden coming up next:
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Above is a small section of the Devils Garden. Devils Garden are rocks and cliffs that are saturated with iron.
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We’re about half way back to our final stop and we have a look at the arrival road.
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.

.
As always, there’s always a gift store. Yes, we made a purchase. Below a Ranger explains to Carla the cause of the heavy coloring in the rock formations.

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.

The next few pictures are from a movie at the Visitor’s Center. The arch below was just to long a walk to see in person.
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.

Above is another look of Hoodoos in the Winter time.
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.

.Above and below are from the movie and are Winter scenes. Our visit to the Arches National Park was awesome. Accessibility was another big plus as well, as one who trips over himself walking in a parking lot.

 

Antelope Canyon (pictorial)

 

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.25.2019 ANTELOPE CANYON TOUR

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Courtesy of WikiLeaks

Upper Antelope Canyon is called Tsé bighánílíní, ‘the place where water runs through rocks’ by the Navajo. It is the most frequently visited by tourists for two reasons. First, its entrance and entire length are at ground level, requiring no climbing.

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Second, beams or shafts of direct sunlight radiating down from openings at the top of the canyon are much more common in Upper than in Lower.

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Beams occur most often in the summer months, as they require the sun to be high in the sky. Winter colors are more muted. Summer months provide two types of lighting.

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Light beams start to peek into the canyon March 20 and disappear October 7 each year.

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Antelope Canyon is visited exclusively through guided tours, in part because rains during monsoon season can quickly flood the canyon. Rain does not have to fall on or near the Antelope Canyon slots for flash floods to whip through, as rain falling dozens of miles away upstream of the canyons can funnel into them with little prior notice.

 

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On August 12, 1997, eleven tourists, including seven from France, one from the United Kingdom, one from Sweden and two from the United States, were killed in Lower Antelope Canyon by a flash flood. Very little rain fell at the site that day, but an earlier thunderstorm had dumped a large amount of water into the canyon basin, 7 miles (11 km) upstream.

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The lone survivor of the flood was tour guide Francisco “Pancho” Quintana, who had prior swift-water training. At the time, the ladder system consisted of amateur-built wood ladders that were swept away by the flash flood. Today, ladder systems have been bolted in place, and deployable cargo nets are installed at the top of the canyon. At the fee booth, a NOAA Weather Radio from the National Weather Service and an alarm horn are stationed.

Despite improved warning and safety systems, the risks of injuries from flash floods still exist. On July 30, 2010, several tourists were stranded on a ledge when two flash floods occurred at Upper Antelope Canyon. Some of them were rescued and some had to wait for the flood waters to recede. There were reports that a woman and her nine-year-old son were injured as they were washed away downstream, but no fatalities were reported.

 

  

Bryce Canyon

 Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

TRAVEL ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.19.2019 Bryce Canyon Park part of Zion.

This article is Courtesy of the National Park Service
Bryce Canyon National Park lies on the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south central Utah.

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Bryce Canyon National Monument (administered by the U.S. Forest Service) was originally established on June 8, 1923 to preserve the “unusual scenic beauty, scientific interest, and importance.”

The Visitor’s Center

On June 7, 1924, the monument’s name was changed to Utah National Park and it was transferred to the National Park Service. On February 25, 1928 Utah National Park was changed to Bryce Canyon National Park. Subsequent legislation enlarged the park to its current size of 35,835 acres.

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The route we will follow up to, but not including MM11. Site 11 is still impacted with snow.


Bryce is famous for its unique geology, consisting of a series of horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters carved from the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah.

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The erosional force of frost-wedging and the dissolving power of rainwater have shaped the colorful calcium-rich mudstone of the Claron Formation into bizarre shapes including slot canyons, windows, fins, and spires called “hoodoos.”

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Columns seen at the bottom of the picture are Hoodoos.


Tinted with colors too numerous and subtle to name, these whimsically arranged rocks create a wondrous landscape of mazes, offering some of the most exciting and memorable walks and hikes imaginable.

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As much as I like to pretend that Carla and I are climbing cliffs and leaning over them as well, it’s not true. What you see above is the type of climbing and walking we do most of the time. The National Park Service walkways are not generally this nice or this big, but they are paved


Ponderosa pines, high elevation meadows, and fir-spruce forests border the rim of the plateau and abound with wildlife. This area boasts some of the world’s best air quality, offering panoramic views of three states and approaching 200 miles of visibility. This, coupled with the lack of nearby large light sources, creates unparalleled opportunities  for stargazing.


This Canyon is named after this couple, they discovered it and brought it to the attention of the public. Ebenezer and Mary Bryce.>….


One of the first questions people ask when visiting the rugged wilds of southern Utah is, “Who would live here?” The answer is, “Many different cultures over thousands of years have foraged, hunted and survived in this wilderness.”

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This self guided tour we’re on for ten miles is divided into
individual sites and views. Without going into more detail than
necessary I’m attempting to entice you with a small smattering of images along this trip


Historic Resource Study
Introduction: Small by National Park standards, the 56.2 square miles of Bryce Canyon National Park occupy the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south-central Utah. The park is not a canyon. Rather, it is a spectacular series of more than a dozen amphitheaters, each of which is carved at least 1,000 feet into the chromatic limestone of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. …


Just a few more pictures to end this blog. Red Canyon and Bryce Canyon are as exciting, if not more exciting, than the Grand Canyon.


x


Tripping to one of the last viewing locations. Needless to say were going uphill and our elevation, right now, is over 8000 feet./font>


x


To the NPS’s Credit, this is what the viewing trails used to look like before they retrofit them with concrete


x x x


The final leg of our tour is around nine-thousand foot level and yes, snow abounds everywhere.



“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

orange-red

blue….

 

Kanab, UT

 

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.19.19-GOOD FRIDAY-EXPERIENCE KANAB CANYONS

Good Friday is a day of fast and abstinence. The last few days we’ve done so much “hanging around” spending another day doing nothing wasn’t that appealing. It is a special day and TV is usually at a minimum or nothing until at least 3pm. We decided to experience His majesty wonders by viewing the canyons in Kanab, UT.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kanab (/kəˈnæb/kə-NAB) is a city in and the county seat of Kane County, Utah, United States.[4] It is located on Kanab Creek just north of the Arizona state line.

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The road-side views on our way to Red Canyon were awesome.

 

This area was first settled in 1864 and the town was founded in 1870 when ten Latter-Day Saint families moved into the area.[5] The population was 4,312 at the 2010 census.

Red Canyon Area:

We even had the opportunity to drive through two sand-rock tunnels to find ourselves here. The name “Red Canyon” comes from the heave concentration of iron minerals in the sand-rock itself.

Kanab is situated in the “Grand Circle” area, centrally located among Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, Bryce Canyon National Park, the Grand Canyon (North Rim), Zion National Park, and Lake Powell.

Bryce Canyon Area:

The Bryce Canyon tour encompassed several stops in different locations. Each location offered a unique canyon character from the previous location, please read the blogs on these.

Other nearby attractions include Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park, the privately owned Moqui Cave, and the largest animal sanctuary in the United States, Best Friends Animal Society.

Some additional pictures of Bryce Canyon:

 

Locals refer to Kanab as “Little Hollywood” due to its history as a filming location for many movies and television series, prominently western, such as Stagecoach (1939), The Lone Ranger, Death Valley Days. Gunsmoke, Daniel Boone, El Dorado (1966), Planet of the Apes (1968), Mackenna’s Gold, Sergeants 3, WindRunner: A Spirited Journey, Western Union (1941), The Desperadoes (1943), In Old Oklahoma (1943), Buffalo Bill (1944), Westward the Women (1952), Tomahawk Trail (1957), Fort Bowie (1958), Sergeants Three (1962), Duel at Diablo (1966), Ride in the Whirlwind (1965), The Shooting (1966), and The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976).[6][7]

 

Courtesy of Wikipedia

 

Bryce Canyon National Park lies on the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south central Utah. Bryce Canyon National Monument (administered by the U.S. Forest Service) was originally established on June 8, 1923 to preserve the “unusual scenic beauty, scientific interest, and importance.” On June 7, 1924, the monument’s name was changed to Utah National Park and it was transferred to the National Park Service. On February 25, 1928 Utah National Park was changed to Bryce Canyon National Park. Subsequent legislation enlarged the park to its current size of 35,835 acres.

Bryce is famous for its unique geology, consisting of a series of horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters carved from the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah. The erosional force of frost-wedging and the dissolving power of rainwater have shaped the colorful calcium-rich mudstone of the Claron Formation into bizarre shapes including slot canyons, windows, fins, and spires called “hoodoos.” Tinted with colors too numerous and subtle to name, these whimsically arranged rocks create a wondrous landscape of mazes, offering some of the most exciting and memorable walks and hikes imaginable.

Ponderosa pines, high elevation meadows, and fir-spruce forests border the rim of the plateau and abound with wildlife. This area boasts some of the world’s best air quality, offering panoramic views of three states and approaching 200 miles of visibility. This, coupled with the lack of nearby large light sources, creates unparalleled opportunities for stargazing.

 


“Everything we were, we carry with us. Everything we will be, is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet.” pjgrenier


 

Kolob Canyon Trail

View Journals – select “Journals” from above for the drop-down menu.

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.11.2019

Kolob

Late Summer Storm in Kolob Canyons

This text is courtesy of the National Park Service


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Awesome scenery don’t you think?

 


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Welcome to Kolob Canyons
The Kolob Canyons section of Zion National Park is located at Exit 40 on Interstate 15, 40 miles north of Zion Canyon and 17 miles south of Cedar City.

 


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 A five-mile scenic drive along the Kolob Canyons Road allows visitors to view the crimson canyons and gain access to various trails and scenic viewpoints.

 

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Even this kind of path isn’t that bad, if only it were not always going uphill.

 

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Here in the northwest corner of the park, narrow parallel box canyons are cut into the western edge of the Colorado Plateau, forming majestic peaks and 2,000 foot cliff walls.

 

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The sign says one-half mile but it honestly felt like two miles. Below,
Yea, we have walking sticks also, in the car.

 

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Whether you come to view the panoramic landscape from our scenic drive, hike into one of our majestic canyons, or begin a multi-day adventure into the Zion Wilderness, Kolob Canyons has something special for everyone to experience.

 

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I’m coming!!!

The NPS evidently found its nice walkways being drowned out by heavy downpours. To try to eliminate the problem they set up the path in square block allowing a space in between each square block for water to pass through… ingenious!

 

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Kolob Canyons Visitor Center
All guests are required to stop at the Kolob Canyons Visitor Center to show an Interagency Park Pass or pay the Zion National Park entrance fee.

 

 

If Carla looks a little tired right now, you’re right, I think we both are.

Wilderness permits can be obtained here for backpacking campsites
and canyoneering routes in the park.

 

 

 

There is also a bookstore operated by the Zion Natl Park Forever Project.

Did you notice we’re still going uphill!

 

 

 

The views are so awesome it takes you attention off the job at hand,
walking without tripping. This is the reason we opted not to walk the Bright-Angel  path to the bottom of the grand canyon. I can think of one or two other reasons as well.

 

 

 

These are the paths I don’t get excited about. A couple of years ago I would not have thought twice about this type of challenge, but not any more. Now I live with a fear of tripping over something or even my own two feet.

 

 

 

Did I mention we’re both getting a little tired of going uphill!!

 

 

Yup, still going uphill. On the bright side,
we’ve been told we’re almost there.

 

 

Carla finally reaches the top, I follow right after her.
There is another peak and observation point
but we’re just going to take their word on the views from there.

 

 

 

As you can see we’ve begun our final leg of this venture, the walk back.
It’s been an awesome experience, but we’re both anxiously looking fort our car.

 

 

The trip down is steep and carries it’s own trepidations, once again, tripping and falling.

 

 

 

Remember these guys? I won’t say any more. In a few minutes the car comes into view.
Ah! The ride home, heavenly!

 

 

 

You’ll have to blow it up on your computer to read the captions in the picture, but in short, it says that everything up on these hills might and someday will fall down to the ground. The left side of the picture is about a 900 ton rock that came down and fell on a truck. Nether the truck nor the driver did well that day.

 

 

Up and down this five-mile stretch of road you’ll find
road crews creating observation points and laying down
new pavement for generations to come to enjoy this venue.

 

 

 

Home is only a thirty minute ride but we enjoyed every mile of it.

 

 

“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

 

Zion National Park

To view Journals select “Journals” from the drop-down menu, and select the month and year.

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.08.2019- Monday- Zion National Park

 

Trip to Zion

5750

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This is Quail Lake.  As you can see from the wall that confines it, it’s man-made. For an area that does not boast of many lakes, natural or man-made, this one is huge.

 

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Just a few scenic views of the area and the road to Zion. Our first stop will be Zion Lodge.

 

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We are approaching Zion National Park.

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Zion Lodge and check in center. It takes us about thirty minutes to get here from St. George. We’ll check in with this ranger, who vacations in Orlando, FL, using Carla’s park pass, and make our way to the Visitor’s center.

 

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National Park Service is working diligently to create a venue very similar to what we saw in the Grand Canyon. It’s work in progress but so much has already been accomplished, especially the roads, walking areas and parking venues.

 

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Work construction going on in preparation for the Summer crowds. The roadways are very well marked as well as walkways and trail ways.  We’re in a double-car shuttle here taking us to our first stop.

 

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Just a very small number of views we experienced on our trip to our first stop.

 

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The grotto will be our first walking tour. Yes, we did a lot walking today.

 

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The Grotto.

It’s just a place, no lake and no waterfalls. But it’s not next door. No Uber either, foot power only.

 

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So many vistas. I had over three-hundred pictures but could only use fifty of so.

 

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Every one of these venues are accessible but it’s always an uphill climb to get there. The path began as being very generous, that will change in a few minutes.

 

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Above is what the path will turn into. A gravel walkway with stone, roots and narrows to contend with.

 

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I mean to find out the significance of this tree. The bark on this tree has been twisted either by wind or water.

 

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Move unbelievable vistas. This is all part of the Grotto.

 

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A Ranger homestead. There are several in the area. Below is  shuttle bus, just missed it. They come around every 15-20 minutes.

 

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From here we’ll look for trail signs for our next venue; Weeping Rock. n the meantime enjoy some of the many mountain views around here until we can figure out where we go next, it’s around here somewhere.

 

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Okay, we found the trail. As always it goes uphill first.

 

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Weeping Rock Trailhead

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In the distance you can see our destination, Weeping Rock. It’s about and quarter-mile away and, as always, it will be an uphill climb.

 

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The National Park Service does such. Great job of making g these venues accessible. No much anyone can do about the uphill climbs. The paths are passable but not always paved. Everyone must pay attention to where they place their feet and a walking stick is always helpful. Above you can see primitive steps and below a state of the art people bridge, to move the millions of visitors along.

 

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The trail, in sections, is very passable and as you can see below we do get to our destination.

 

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Looking away from the falls you can appreciate the effort the NPS has gone through to allow large groups of people enjoy these beautiful destinations. Below, however, it’s time for us to turn our attention to going back and catching another shuttle to take us to our car.

 

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The best part of leaving a particular venue, in most cases, is that it is usually a downhill walk. Be mindful, however, walking a steep grade downhill produces its own set of precautions.

 

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Finally we get to that beautiful bridge again and those primitive steps.

 

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We take one last look at Weeping Rock and say good-bye. It’s time to try to find the trail to the Temple of  Sinawava.

 

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Temple of Sinawava / River Walk


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The above two climbers are climbing the rock mountain shown below. If you  look closely you might see two very small speck at the dead center of the picture; that’s them.

 

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Every hike begins with our trying to find the trail to hike. It’s not generally that difficult but just wanted he text to fit the picture. Below is Sinawava. t looks close but it’s about a very slow quarter-mile hike.

 

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Yup, we found our path. Carla takes the first steps. Below is Sinawava also.

 

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This begins with the Riverdale. We’ll be walking along the Virgin River.

 

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We cross the Virgin River and yes, Carla is looking a little tired. A great deal of walking today, and we’re feeling it. In the next few pictures are scenes of the mountains we be seeing on our walk.

 

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The Lower Emerald Pool

 

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“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

 

St. George, Utah

To view the Journal for APRIL click on this link GOTO April Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY

March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
***************************************

4.06.2019..A Brief History of the Establishment of St. George, Utah
courtesy of utahsdixie.com

5645K The Virgin River Anasazi were St. George’s earliest residents, inhabiting the area from approximately 200 B.C. to 1200 A.D. They left behind rock art and ruins of their dwellings. The reason for their departure is unknown to this day. The Pauite tribe arrived between 1100 and 1200 A.D., utilizing the area as a hunting ground for deer, rabbits and other animals. The Pauites also grew crops along the riverbeds, including corn, wheat and melons. In 1776, the Dominguez-Escalante Party became the first recorded European-Americans to visit the area. Fur trappers and government survey parties followed.

5659In 1854, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (also known as the LDS Church, or Mormon Church) established an Indian mission in Santa Clara, two miles northwest of present-day St. George. The church set up experimental farms in the St. George Valley in 1857-1858. In October 1861, church leaders called 309 families to establish the Cotton Mission. After the outbreak of the Civil War that same year, LDS Church President Brigham Young felt it necessary to grow cotton, if possible. Many of these families assigned to settle the area hailed from the South and possessed the necessary skills to grow cotton and establish a community. Paying homage to the nickname of their former home, these settlers called the region “Utah’s Dixie.”

5655St. George, Utah was named in honor of Mormon apostle George A. Smith, also known as the “Potato Saint” because he urged early settlers to eat raw, unpeeled potatoes to cure scurvy. Smith did not participate in the town’s settlement, but personally selected many of the pioneers that originally settled the area. The first years in St. George proved difficult for early residents due to challenges such as flooding, lack of culinary water and scorching summer heat. A cotton factory erected soon after the settlers’ arrival produced off and on for approximately 50 years, but overall, cotton proved an unsuccessful venture. The area also produced silk as early as 1874, but its production did not contribute significantly to the area’s economic prosperity. Other early pioneer endeavors included the production of molasses, dried fruit and even wine.

5657St. George became the county seat of Washington County in 1863. That same year, construction began on the St. George LDS Tabernacle, which was finished in 1875. In 1871, work began on the St. George LDS Temple, which became a cooperative effort uniting many Southern Utah communities. Mormon Apostle Daniel H. Wells dedicated the temple on April 6, 1877. It was the first temple constructed west of the Mississippi River. Undergoing significant renovations in the late 1930s and mid 1970s, the structure is the longest continuously operated Mormon Temple in the world.

5658In 1911, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of St. George’s settling, the Dixie Academy building was constructed. The LDS Church operated the academy until 1933, when it became a two-year college within Utah’s higher education system. The new Dixie College campus opened in the southeastern corner of the city in the 1960s. Today, Dixie State College boasts an enrollment of approximately 5,200 and features several four-year programs, including Business Administration and Computer and Information Technology.

5663KToday St. George is the largest city in Washington County and the eighth-largest city in Utah. Its metropolitan area is home to nearly 120,000 residents. It has consistently ranked as one of the fastest growing areas in the nation for the last two decades, even surpassing Las Vegas in per capita growth. St. George has become a popular retirement destination as well a respite for those seeking a second home in a more moderate climate. New residents are attracted to St. George’s scenic beauty and its close proximity to unparalleled recreation, including Zion National Park, Lake Powell and Grand Canyon National Park.

St. George is a city, not as big as El Paso but still big. It has everything. We’ll be going out to eat later today at Texas Roadhouse. Hopefully I’ll have a picture or two of the city later. We’ve already visited Best Buy and Roadhouse later.  The pictures above are of the Visitor’s Center of St. George. It’s also, as I’ve mentioned before, a museum on the animals of the World, including, of course, Utah.


“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, f
rom the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Sam’s Town, Las Vegas, NV

 

To view the Journals select the month and year your looking for.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
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After having an absolutely delicious breakfast we just had to take a walk. Getting not this place was the hard part. There are places we can’t get to and they require a special “key.”

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It’s like a members only perk. We did have one person that offered to let us in on her card, but we opted to play by the rules.

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There is literally no need to leave this building. This garden alone is a great place to sit and meditate on the moneys You may have lost in the casino.

 

Insider the garden area are an assortment of small businesses and franchises; ice cream, subway and a slew of others. I forgot to mention there’s a bowling alley and a multi-screen theater as well.

 

OH!, there’s, of course, a casino.

 

And more casino!

We enjoyed are stay and came back a few days later to enjoy another breakfast. You’re right, we did lose some money here, about $42.00. I think we got away cheap.

 

 


“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

We visit the Fashion Mall

 

To view the Journals select “Journals” for the drop-down menu.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY

March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest

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4.02.2019-
Yes, there is a Microsoft store in the Fashion Mall. This place was huge. Possibly a little Exterior view of Fashion Show smaller than the city of Titusville, FL. Hundreds of shops and kiosks. We needed to find a schematic on where everything is located. And there is was, an information kiosk. This venue was about eight feet tall and two feet wide and totally interactive. We’d never experienced anything so easy to operate. goto-Fashion Show Mall OH! We did find the Microsoft store and the young  staff girl was able to resuscitate the surface back to life again.

The longer we stay here the more this town is growing on us. Another venue popped up on our way a Cathedral.

This was so awesome, except in a vein attempt to find our way to its location we failed. We will have to put this venue off to the next time we visit Vegas.

 


“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Coach goes to Findlay RV for fixes

To view the Journals for MARCH select “Journals” for the drop-down menu.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

March/April ITENERARY
March 3rd Phoenix, AZ overnight (. )
March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x14n
March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground for 4 nights
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)*****************************************

3.27.2019- COACH GOES TO FINDLAY RV FOR FIXES
Bright and early this morning we were on the road going to Findlay RV about 1.5miles from here. No time for breakfast so we thought we’d eat out. We were give several suggestions for breakfast and then , just as an after thought, Sam’s Town Casino was also recommended. Like all casinos in Vegas, this is an all inclusive venue. Bowling, gambling, movies, breakfast, lunch, dinner are provided and lodging. 

Stay here and you can spend all your days and nights in your slippers. We enjoyed an awesome breakfast buffet, so much to pick from. The price was right also. Not including the tip we ate scrumptiously for just a few dollars more than at McDonald’s. After breakfast we walked through the casino. At first I thought this might be a Sam’s Club operation but our waitress informed us otherwise. This was a Sam Boyd Family  business. Not to mention they have over a dozen other locations throughout the US. After breakfast it was a short drive back to Findlay RV. Good and bad news awaited us. The hydraulic lines that were ordered prior to order arrival were incorrect. Good news; they could fabricate what we needed in house.  Next the stairs were acting up, they needed a new motor. The propane tank needed a new pressure regulator, no can do. We have to have Suburban do that job. Lastly two of the storage bin doors needed new latches, done! Today’s bill would be just under four figures and we pay again about the same amount for the motor for the stairs. No biggy. It’s still much cheaper than owning a brick and mortar home. We rested the rest of the day.Pictures to follow.


“Everything we were, we carry with us.
Everything we will be, is calling to us,
from the roads not travelled yet.” pjgrenier


			

Grand Canyon Trip

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

This month’s Travel Plans:
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
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3.18.2019 Day 1 -The Blue Route Grand Canyon

Bright Angel… revisiting the East Rim of the Grand Canyon

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Our site is located in the Bright Angel area. This is where we visited almost eight years ago with Abby. Yup, that’s us. Sitting on a wall with an 1800 foot drop behind us. But it made for a good picture.I won’t go into detail but I’ll let you imagine what we might be expecting at this elevation!

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In the picture above are the San Francisco Peaks. At this point there still about twenty miles from us. Yea, the answer to the question posed above: snow, sleet and cold temps.

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This is our campground and a herd of dear just came over to visit. DO NOT FEED THE WILDLIFE, is what all the signs are telling us. At Cottonwood, just the opposite was true. They even provided the food. We’ll be visiting the Kolb studio shortly. It’s a story of two early 1900’s photographers that made a reputation for themselves as daredevil photographers.

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This is what we came here to see. Below of course is us again.

And, of course, the happy couple

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Once again, it’s what we came here to see!

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No I don’t know this young girl, but she’s sitting on the edge of an 1800 foot cliff to the bottom for the canyon, I just don’t understand her thinking.

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The Kolb museum and gift store.

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On the outside deck of the Kolb station.

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Looking back on to the Bright Angel Inn and restaurant.

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More awesome views. Below is a view of a natural bridge on the mountain path to the canyon bottom. Carla, Abby and I walked this path about nine years ago. We passed on it this time.

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Above is a canoe of that period of time in a glass case and the blocks you see is a primitive  life jacket made from chunks of cork.

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Walking to the transfer Station. This is where you get off the our bus and board a GC city bus to your location.

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The transfer station. It took us over 30 minutes before we caught a ride.

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Got a chance to meet Sue and Mark on our ride back to the campground.

 

3.19.2019 Day 2 -Red Tour-Grand Canyon-West Rim
Carla kills the fireplace blower.

The chart above show us the designated viewing locations that the bus will stop at. One bus will drop off and 15 minutes later another bus will do a pick up and go to the next stop. View from our first stop below.

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As you know there are two tours currently a tour being offered; The East Rim and the West Rim. There’s also to the North  Rim, but the North rim is closed until May. The bus stops at certain designated areas, viewing spots, and another bus comes by every fifteen minutes for visitors to board and go to the next viewing spot. Below you see the view from this location. n the center of the picture s the Colorado River (brown water).

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Now we go wait for the next bus. There is an option, you could walk to each of these stops but were to old for such a diversion. The person in the picture below is much younger and has more years than we do, she’s walking.

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Another awesome view from our bus on our way to the next stop. Below, time to leave this venue and wait for another bus.

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I think the dude above is looking over the edge saying it’s not that scary. He’s also in the right hand in the outside of the safety rails. A person falls at 200 feet per second which might give him nine seconds to contemplate how stupid it was to lose his footing and start falling.5168

About the above pictures. Geologists have determined that about three-thousand years ago the picture on the left looked very much like the picture on the right. That damming up of the Colorado river was caused by a slow oozing of lava from the bottom of the canyon. This to can be Googled. 

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Just a two minute break to rest our feet. This sojourn may not look that taxing, but were both getting a little tired. The more we see the more it all looks the same.

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Here’s where we cheated, and you did not even notice. We’re tired! Because of our sudden lack of energy made the decision to skip the last two venues. Instead we opted to proceed to the end of the Red Tour which is Hermit’s Rest. There’s a nice story behind the name but to much for this blog… Google it!

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It took a forty-five minute drive to get us from Hermit’s Rest to the transfer station and it will take another twenty minutes to reach our destination; our campground! Enough for today, I need a nap. Below, hole we wait for our city bus another deer or two show up and show off.

Below, finally, our campground. It’s about a ten minute walk from where the city bus drops us off and we made it. Nice to be home again. I think were going to do nothing tomorrow…

 

3.20.2019 Day 3 Grand Canyon
Rain expected.

 

 

3.21.2019 Day 4 GC- Depart for Vegas for 4 nights.
Dump tanks and prepare to leave for Vegas.

 

 


“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

 

Montezuma Well

 

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journals…or click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
14. March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x 14 nights (A section!!)
15. March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground for 4 nights
16. March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights

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3.14.2019 1pm Thursday

The text italicized h’s been taken from Wikipedia

Archaeological evidence suggests that humans have lived in the Verde Valley for at least 10,000 years. The earliest signs of permanent settlement in the area appear quite a bit later, however, around 600 CE.

It only took about 30 minutes for us to get here,
awesome! About 15 miles.

The ruins of several prehistoric dwellings are scattered in and around the rim of the Well. Their erstwhile inhabitants belonged to several indigenous American cultures that are believed to have occupied the Verde Valley between 700 and 1425 CE, the foremost of which being a cultural group archaeologists have termed the Southern Sinagua.[3] The earliest of the ruins located on the property (with the exception of the irrigation canal), a “pithouse” in the traditional Hohokam style, dates to about 1050 CE. More than 50 countable “rooms” are found inside the park boundaries; it is likely that some were used for purposes other than living space, including food storage and religious ceremonies.

No fees involved just a few rules to obey.

 

The Sinagua people, and possibly earlier cultures, intensively farmed the land surrounding the Well using its constant outflow as a reliable source of irrigation. Beginning about 700 CE, the Well’s natural drainage into the immediately adjacent Wet Beaver Creek was diverted into a man-made canal running parallel to the creek, segments of which still conduct the outflow today.

What’s involved here is to ascend about 300 feet to see the Well.
The well is in an area where a source of water is scarce.

The prehistoric canal, estimated at nearly seven miles in length, likely drained into a network of smaller lateral canals downstream, supplying perhaps as much as 60 acres of farmland with water.[3] The route of the modern canal is partly original, especially close to the outlet, but large portions have been re-routed over time as irrigation needs have changed.

People were living here from the 1100’s.
This Well was considered by them to be sacred.
This climb is much steeper than the picture indicates.

 

Much of the abandoned original route is still visible within the park, however, as the warm water emerging from the Well contains a high concentration of lime, which over many centuries was deposited along the canal walls as the water cooled downstream; the accumulated lime has since hardened into a cement-like coating, preserving the canal’s shape.since hardened into a cement-like coating, preserving the canal’s shape.

This picture is really all about the cacti plants.

The existence of the Well was almost unknown to European Americans before the publishing of Handbook to Arizona by Richard J. Hinton in 1878. In 1968, Montezuma Well was the subject of the first ever underwater archaeological survey to take place in a federally managed park, led by archaeologist George R Fischer.

This is what the climb was all about.
We were told that the
water has always been arsenic laced.

 

the Yavapai people consider the Well a deeply sacred site, as they believe it is the place through which they emerged into the world.

The trip was nice and the knowledge acquired was extremely interesting. Not sure if I would make the trip again.


“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Montezuma Castle

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journals…or click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

This month’s Travel Plans:
14. March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x 14 nights (A section!!)
15. March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground for 4 nights
16. March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights

*****************************************

3.14.2019-Thursday-we visit Montezuma Castle and Montezuma Well

The italicized text is courtesy of the National Park Service (NPS)

The nice part of these two venues is their location, within a 30 minute ride from this campground. Both venues were very interesting but not as interesting as I had hoped for.

We must check in and present our Park Pass with accompanying ID, nice part, no money is exchanged.

On December 8, 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt celebrated the passage of the Antiquities Act by declaring four sites of historic and cultural significance as our nation’s first National Monuments. Among these was Montezuma Castle, which the President identified as a place “of the greatest ethnological value and scientific interest.”

This is like taking a stroll in the park. 
The cement path is about six-feet wide.

Although very few original artifacts remained in the structure due to intensive looting of the site, Roosevelt’s decision assured the continued protection of one of the best preserved prehistoric cliff dwellings in North America.

Below..A Sycamore Tree. The ancestors use them extensively
in the construction of their cliff homes and ladders.

Montezuma Castle National Monument quickly became a destination for America’s first car-bound tourists. In 1933, “Castle A”, a 45-50 room, pueblo ruin was excavated, uncovering a wealth of artifacts and greatly enhanced our understanding of the Sinagua people who inhabited this riparian “oasis” along Beaver Creek for over 400 years.

This is the same river, the Verde River, 
that runs in back of our campground. 
This section of the river is called Beaver Creek.

Early visitors to the monument were allowed access to the structure by climbing a series of ladders up the side of the limestone cliffs. However, due to extensive damage to this valuable cultural landmark, public access of the ruins was discontinued in 1951.

This is what we came here to see.  the wall is a four-level living  quarters that housed dozens of people. In the next picture you’ll see a schematic. In the pictures that will follow arena additional living spaces used by these peoples. 

Now, approximately 350,000 people a year gaze through the windows of the past during a visit to Montezuma Castle. Even 600 years after their departure, the legacy of the Sinagua people continues to inspire the imaginations of this and future generations.

If you could remove the front wall this is what you would see.

Your neighbors would live in these cut-outs. The stone here is mostly limestone which is very soft but the dark/black rock you also see is Manganese a very hard rock.

“Everything we were, we carry with us.
 Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not traveled yet." pjgrenier

			

Jerome, AZ

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
14. March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x 14 nights
15. March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground X 4 nights
16. March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground X 14 nights

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Our trip to Jerome was just as inspiring as all  our trips in this beautiful state. Every rod we travel look like they are no more than five-years old; awesome!


DSC_4681dd At this location we can see Jerome in the distance. These rusting machines of the past are symbolic of the mining tools that grew Jerome in the past.

The Italicized text to follow courtesy of the Jerome Historical Society

History of Jerome, Arizona
4686-Jerome was built on Cleopatra Hill above a vast deposit of copper. Prehistoric Native Americans were the first miners, seeking colored stones. The Spanish followed, seeking gold but finding copper. Anglos staked the first claims in the area in 1876,
and United Verde mining operations began in 1883, followed by the Little Daisy claim.

jerome1927Jerome grew rapidly from tent city to prosperous company town as it followed the swing of the mine’s fortunes. The mines, the workers, and those who sought its wealth, formed Jerome’s colorful history.Americans, Mexicans, Croatians, Irish, Spaniards, Italians, and Chinese made the mining camp a cosmopolitan mix that added to its rich life and excitement.Historic Jerome 2Jerome was the talk of the Territory, a boom town of its time, the darling of promoters and investors. The mines were nourished and exploited by financiers who brought billions of dollars in copper, gold, and silver from its depths. Changing times in the Territory saw pack burros, mule drawn freight wagons, and horses replaced by steam engines, autos, and trucks.

Fires ravaged the clapboard town and landslides destroyed whole sections. Jerome was always rebuilt. At the mercy of the ups and downs of copper prices, labor unrest, depressions and wars, Jerome’s mines finally closed in 1953.

Jerome Today

jerome sidewalkAfter the mines closed in 1953 and “King Copper” left town, the population went from a peak of 15,000 in the 1920s to a low of 50 people. The Jerome Historical Society guarded the buildings against vandalism and the elements, the Douglas Mansion became a State Park in 1965, and Jerome became a National Historic Landmark in 1976. During the 60’s and 70’s, during the time of the counter culture, Jerome offered a haven for artists.

Soon newcomers and Jerome old timers were working together to bring Jerome back to life. Today, Jerome is very much alive with writers, artists, artisans, musicians, historians, and families. They form a peaceful, colorful, thriving community built on a rich foundation of history and lore.

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4703dd -This is the miner created cross of nails and hammers. Above is another  example of Arizona’s creative road décor.

Below is a closed mining camp.

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"Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Holy Family Church in Jerome, AZ

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

This month’s Travel Plans:
14. March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x 14 nights (A section!!)
15. March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground for 4 nights
16. March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights

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3.10.2019 

New Life for Holy Family Catholic Church, Jerome AZ…

Posted on by Diane Rapport-November 26, 2014

Scott Kola, wasn’t always Catholic. He was a renegade from growing up in a family of conservative Orthodox Jews with a Rabbi father and converted to Catholicism eleven years ago. Today, he lives in the Holy Family Catholic Church’s convent, where he can monitor day-to-day restoration. The Holy Family Catholic Church in Jerome AZ, built in 1896, then rebuilt a few years later after it burned down, is the town’s oldest church. Image courtesy Wikimedia.

A year and a half ago, Scott outlined the structural problems of the church and his dreams for renovation to Father David Kalesh, pastor of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Cottonwood. The three-story brick and stone back wall facing Main Street is bowed, its foundation crumbling, mortar for its brick and stone façade in need of repointing. Not surprising for a building that was built in 1896, burned in the fire of 1898, and was rebuilt as a brick and stone structure in 1899-1900. It was known as the ‘miner’s church.

Father David and Scott Kolu became strong allies. Together they are bringing Jerome’s Holy Family Catholic Church back to life. Father David conducts Mass on the third Saturday of each month at 8:30 a.m. When long-time and much loved Jerome resident Don Walsh died in late September, a funeral service was held to a packed church of family and friends. “The church has immense historic value,” Father David told me. “Most important are the memories the church holds for former parishioners and their families who visit Jerome. I would like to help the church become the polished jewel that it once was.”

The Pipe Organ

The organ, designed especially for smaller churches, was built by the

prestigious Kilgen and Sons Pipe Organ Company in St. Louis in the early nineteen hundreds. Only two others of the same compact design still remain in the United States. (Perhaps the most well known Kilgen church pipe organ is housed in St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Manhattan.)

“We are ecstatic that Mr. Charles Kegg, President and Artistic Director of Kegg Pipe Organ Builders (www.keggorgan.com) is willing to take on the restoration project,” Scott said. I sent an email to Mr. Kegg and asked him why. “I would like to restore it to its original condition so that it can remain an example of this almost extinct style of American pipe organ,” he said. “The pipe organ in Jerome is rather unusual. . . It was being sent to a place where electricity probably didn’t exist at all at the time, so this organ was built using methods from the mid-19th century and with the intention that it must play under difficult circumstances with little or no maintenance. This was not uncommon at all for remote locations. . . Jerome must have been an outpost much more remote than other locations that would want a pipe organ. Another thing that makes it unusual is that it has survived, virtually intact.”

The article was first published in the Verde Independent newspaper in Cottonwood, AZ on November 18. The photo gallery of Vyto Starkinskas’ photos are spectacular. http://verdenews.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=63344

(Diane Sward Rapaport is the author of Home Sweet Jerome: Death and Rebirth of Arizona’s Richest Copper Mining City. The blogs are different from the stories that are included in the book.) 

© 2019 – Home Sweet Jerome

 

In search of the Verde River

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
14. March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x 14 nights 
15. March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground x 4 nights
16. March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground x 14 nights

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3.09.2019

SATURDAY-IN SEARCH OF THE VERDE RIVER
Temperature for today would span low 30’s to mid-50s’. This is not going to change for at least the next four days.

Carla wants to go out today and look for the Verde River. It should be less than a quarter mile walk except the ground cover will be small cliffs and river rocks. Just a few more pictures so you can appreciate our journey.

We will end the day as always with Mass and pizza.

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All this trail does is go downhill. Next time I’ll remember to bring my walking stick.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This does not look like it, since my camera cannot do 3-D, but this is a very steep downhill trail. For a guy who trips walking on the grass, I’m holding my breath right now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Well this is what we risked life and limb to see, not really worth it. Like they said in the movie “Guilt Trip” We’ve seen it, let’s go.

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Yes it does have a mucky brown look to it.

 

 

 

 

 

Not our coach but we’re in there somewhere.

 

 

 

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Scoots has the right idea, it’s time to take a short nap.

 

 








“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Immaculate Conception RCC

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
14. March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x 14 nights
15. March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground for 4 nights
16. March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights

*****************************************

3.07.2019-Immaculate Conception Roman CC

In 2002 Cottonwood, AZ was mushrooming into the most prominent town in this part of Arizona. N that year a temporary church was built in Cottonwood that could accommodate up to 400 parishioners. It did not take very long before each Mass service was at 90% capacity. In 2006 a committee was set up for the construction of a new church. Ground breaking for the new building took place on 12/8/2009.

The front of the church has three sets of doors. Only the Bishop may enter through the “Center” set of doors but anyone and everyone may use the center doors to exit the church.

The Bell Tower has three bells. They are dedicated to Archangels Gabriel, Rafael and Michael.

 

 

 

 

The Confessional in this picture comes from the National Church of North Benton, Minnesota.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The large “Configuration Window” measures 15 x 25 feet in size. It has 36 smaller windows in it. T is considered “irreplaceable.” It was created for the Transfiguration Church in Philadelphia, PA. The “Rose Window” was created in 1856 for the Immaculate Church in Buffalo, NY. The church was built in 1856 and closed in 2005. The stain glass windows on the left side of the church are based on the Corporal Works of Mercy. The seven stain glass windows on the right side of the church reflect the Spiritual Works of Mercy.

 

 

 

 

The stations of the Cross around the church were made for the Immaculate Conception Church in Prescott Valley. Each is five feet tall. Father David Kelash is the Pastor and is adamant on keeping this parish moving forward. Soon the town expects the building of over 5000 new homes. The Immaculate Conception Church offers both English and Spanish Masses with a splash of Latin just to remind all the Church’s roots. Confession is offered on Thursday, Friday and Saturdays.

 

Mario and a husband and wife in the gift shop were very generous with their time and background information on this church. Both this parish and Cottonwood are growing. On our way home we spent a few dollars at Walmart.

 

 

 

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This picture shows only two of the three doors into the church. The center door, (center picture) may be used by all when exiting the church, but only the bishop may enter the church through these doors

 

 

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The Baptismal Font came from Holy family Church in Jerome. It was made in 1887. It is located just as you enter the church is symbolic that Baptism is needed before we can join the Catholic Family of the Church.

 

MORE TO COME……..!

 

 

The text to follow courtesy of the Catholic News Agency

Our Lady of Czestochowa as Queen of Poland-History on the painting…

The image dates back to the time of the Twelve Apostles, and was painted by the hand of St. Luke the Evangelist, who is believed to have used a tabletop from a table built by Jesus during his time as a carpenter. According to the legend, it was while Luke was painting Mary that she recounted to him the events in the life of Jesus that would eventually be used in his Gospel.

The same legend states that when St. Helen came to Jerusalem in 326 AD to look for the true Cross, she also happened to find this image of Our Lady. She then gave it as a gift to her son Constantine, who built a shrine to venerate it. The painting was placed inside a small church, and the prince later had a Pauline monastery and church built at the location to ensure the painting’s safety. However, in 1430 the Hussites overran the monastery, attempting to take the image. In the process one of the looters took the painting and put it into a wagon and tried to drive away. But when the horses refused to move, he struck the painting twice with his sword. As he raised his hand to strike it again, he suddenly fell over writhing in pain and died. Despite previous attempts to repair the scars from the arrow and the blows from the sword, restorers had trouble in covering them up since the painting was done with tempera infused with diluted wax. The marks remain visible to this day.

More recent stories surrounding the image involve the Russian invasion of Poland in 1920, holding that when the Russian army was gathering on the banks of the Vistula River and threatening Warsaw, they saw an image of Our Lady in the clouds over the city, prompting them to withdraw. The image of Our Lady of Czestochowa gets its nickname “Black Madonna” from the soot residue which discolors the painting as a result of centuries of votive lights and candles burned in front of it. Since the fall of communism in Poland, pilgrimages to the image have significantly increased. As many as 2.5 million pilgrims expected to gather in Krakow for this year’s WYD event. While not all of them will join Pope Francis in Czestochowa, his visit will surely attract more pilgrims to the spot.
A replica of this painting is found in the Immaculate Conception Church, cottonwood, AZ


“Everything we were, we carry with us.
Everything we will be, is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet.” pjgrenier


			

Queen Mine Tour

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journals…or click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.
HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
14. March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x 14 nights
15. March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground X 4 nights
16. March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground X 14 nights

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3.03.2019-Queen Mine Tour
The Queen Mine is located in Bisbee, AZ. The day, as nice as it would have been on its own, was made even nicer by having Tom and Sue join us on this venture.

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History of the Mine
Bisbee’s Queen Mine was one of the richest copper mines in history. The mine opened in 1877 and eventually closed when Phelps Dodge discontinued mining operations in Bisbee in the mid-1970’s. The Queen Mine opened once again as a tour for visitors in 1976, nearly 100 years after the mine originally opened.

Tourism

Today approximately 50,000 people a year visit the Queen Mine Tour to commemorate Bisbee’s prosperous mining heritage and experience what it was like working underground where temperatures are 47 degrees year-round.

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Visit the Mine

To take the tour, enter the changing house, pick up your mine token, and get outfitted with your slicker, helmet and miner’s headlamp. Board the mine train and descend into the mine. Tours are conducted by miners who worked in the mines and tell their own stories from personal experiences.

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915 S.Tovreaville Road 
Bisbee, AZ 85603
Phone: 520-432-6000
information@bisbeeaz.gov

 

I did take some pictures in the mine itself, but the lighting wasn’t sufficient enough to give a decent picture. Ur tour guide was an actual miner back when the mine was open, which gave way for many short stories about life working in a mine.

 

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This was a mockup of how a mine would be worked. Many of the workers, even our guide, was responsible for growing the mine and building the support structures to insure safety.

 

 

 

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Carla was really ready to go digging. 

Everything we were, we carry with us.
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Tombstone, Arizona

To view the Journal for FEBRUARY click on this link goto February Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

This month’s Travel Plans:
7. Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
4. Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (71m)
5. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
6. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
7. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
8. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x13 nights
Phoenix, AZ overnight

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2.25.2019 -Visiting Tombstone, AZ

Life size murals dot the landscape depicting life in Arizona.

Tombstone, as well as our campground, is surrounded by mountains on 2-3 sides… Awesome!

(Text <Italics> on the Scheiffelin Hall taken from Wikipedia)

The Cochise County Courthouse, opened in 1882 and was built in 1882. Cost of construction about $43 thousand, and still strands today.

 

 

These four dudes are the actors that will portray the Shootout at the OK Coral in a few minutes. They are representing Doc Holliday, Morgan, Virgil and Wyatt Earp. As you all know all four will survive the shootout, not so good for the bad guys. They would be Tom and Frank McLaury and Billy and Ike Canton, you can find them at Boothill. As you might already know, the police chief of Tombstone, at the time, was Virgil Earp, not Wyatt. Wyatt and brother Morgan were sworn in at the last minute by brother Virgil, to fend off the Clanton’s and McLaury’s.

Shielfellin Hall

When the hall opened on the corner of Fremont and Fourth Streets in June 8, 1881,[2] it seated 450 on the floor and 125 more in the gallery. The stage drop curtain was painted with a scene from Colorado and was considered a work of art. The building was the center for city entertainment and social events in Tombstone with formal balls and theatrical performances. When it opened, it was “the largest, most elaborate theater between El Paso, Texas and San Francisco, California.” The first play, Tom Taylor’s five-act drama, The Ticket-of-Leave Man, was staged on September 15, 1881.[2] The Hall was scorched by a large fire that burned many

blocks in 1882.

Schieffelin, his brother Ed, and their mining engineer partner Richard Gird formed a partnership, shaking hands on a three-way deal that was never put down on paper. The company they formed, the Tombstone Gold and Silver Mining Company, held title to the claims and worked the mines.[3] They brought in two big strikes, the Lucky Cuss and the Tough Nut. The company produced millions of dollars of wealth for the three owners.

Schieffelin, his brother Ed, and their mining engineer partner Richard Gird formed a partnership, shaking hands on a three-way deal that was never put down on paper. The company they formed, the Tombstone Gold and Silver Mining Company, held title to the claims and worked the mines.[3] They brought in two big strikes, the Lucky Cuss and the Tough Nut. The company produced millions of dollars of wealth for the three owners.

Some original artifacts from the 1880s, not sure about the skeleton!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Tombstone Epitaph was the newspaper de hour in the 1880’s. The Epitaph reported the Gunfight which made news around the country and further.

Some of the Historical Buildings of the town.

I think I read that Morgan Earp was shot dead, in the back, playing pool in the saloon above, I’m pretty sure.

 

Everything we were, we carry with us. Everything we will be, is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet.” pjgrenier


 

Shootout at the OK Coral


HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

 

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
7. Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
4. Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (71m)
5. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
6. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
7. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
8. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x13 nights
Phoenix, AZ overnight

*****************************************

2.25.2019…Shootout at the OK Coral

DSC_4203.jpgK
.On October 26, 1881 The Earp brothers had a shootout with the Ike and Billie Clanton  Frank  McLaury and Billy Claiborne. Unlike television, in this shootout the good guys wore black.


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The Earp Brothers, Virgil, Wyatt and Morgan, with Doc Holiday. I believe that Wyatt was the Tombstone Marshall..Below…the bad guys. .members of the Clanton family.
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This shootout at the OK Coral did not actually take place at high noon, but a little after 1PM. It wasn’t a long battle, about thirty seconds.

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.The bad guy came out the losers. Ike and Billie and left the town wounded.Wyatt, I believe, was not shot unlike his brothers and Doc Holiday.

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After the OK Coral incident Wyatt went on for several years looking for a town that his talents would help only to search in despair. A Sheriff who witnessed the shootout the good guys were charged with murder, only to have those charges dismissed.
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“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us,  
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

 


			

Boothill, Tombstone, AZ

To view the Journal for FEBRUARY click on this link goto February Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
7. Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
4. Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (71m)
5. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
6. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
7. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
8. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x13 nights
Phoenix, AZ overnight

*****************************************

 

2.25.2019 Boothill

Boothill

Our trip to Boothill in Tombstone, AZ was very pleasant. Our Experience at Boothill proved to be more than we expected. Boothill, in Tombstone, is another Arizona town that tells of its history in murals.

 

 

 

 

 

 



Italicized text-From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Originally called Boothill Cemetery, the graveyard was founded in 1878.[4] After a new city cemetery was built elsewhere, the old cemetery stopped accepting new burials in about 1883 (save for very few exceptions) and fell into disrepair until the 1940s, when the city began to restore and preserve it.

A gift shop and the place your purchase your entry ticket.

In order to attract tourists, some of the Boot Hill grave sites are falsely marked, and fictitious claims of burials have been made by the cemetery’s various operators over the years.

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  • Lester Moore, with the famous epitaph “Here lies Lester Moore, Four slugs from a .44, No Les No more.” Lester Moore was purportedly a Wells, Fargo & Co. station agent in the border town of Naco who died in a shootout with Hank Dunstan over a mangled package.[4] There was never anyone named Lester Moore who was killed in Arizona Territory,[citation needed] and there is no evidence to indicate where Dunstan (who also died in the purported shootout) was buried.

  • George Johnson, with epitaph “Here lies George Johnson, hanged by mistake 1882. He was right we were wrong. But we strung him up and now he’s gone.”
  • John Heath, accused of organizing the robbery that led to the 1883 Bisbee massacre, has a grave marker near the grave of the five perpetrators of the massacre. John Heath was arrested and convicted, and was later removed by a mob from the Tombstone jail and lynched on February 22, 1884.[7] However, he was not buried in Boothill Cemetery; his body was returned to his estranged wife in Terrell, Texas, and was buried there in Oakland Cemetery.

  • Thomas Harper is another badman supposedly buried in Boothill Cemetery. He was a friend of Curly Bill Brocius and was hanged for murder by Sheriff Bob Paul in Tucson on July 8, 1881.[8] Harper was buried in Tucson, not in Tombstone.
  • Federico Duran, spelled as “Fiderico Doran” on the grave marker, who was claimed to have been killed by Sheriff John Slaughter after the Agua Zarca train robbery in 1888. In fact, Duran and train robber Jack Taylor were executed by firing squad in Guaymas, Mexico in December 1889.[9] Slaughter had nothing to do with their deaths and Duran was not buried in Tombstone.
    Below the graves of the bad guys at the OK Coral.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


“Everything we were, we carry with us.
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Pima County Boneyard

To view the Journal for FEBRUARY click on this link goto February Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.
HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
7. Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
4. Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (71m)
5. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
6. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
7. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
8. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x13 nights
Phoenix, AZ overnight

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2.20.2019-Pima County Boneyard

(The bold/italicized text below has been taken from Wikipedia)

A large number of the museum’s aircraft are displayed outside with the remainder located in one of the museum’s four display hangars.[1] In addition to the display hangars, the museum has a restoration hangar.[2]

Opened to the public in May 1976 with 48 aircraft then on display, the Museum’s main hangar houses an SR-71A Blackbird, an A-10 Warthog, a United States Air Force Through the Years exhibit, and a mock-up of a control tower.

I believe this is a C-130. Tom Ward used to pilot a plane like this when he was deployed.

The museum is adjacent to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. The 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG), affiliated with the base, also known as the “Graveyard of Planes” or “The Boneyard”, is the largest aircraft storage and preservation facility in the world. Bus tours of the boneyard leave from the museum several times a day from Monday to Friday, except Federal holidays.

The nearby Titan Missile Museum is located about 20 miles south of Tucson in Green Valley off of Interstate 19 and features a Titan II intercontinental ballistic missile still in its silo. Tours of the above-ground and underground installations around the missile are conducted daily. More extensive “top-to-bottom” tours take up to five hours and are conducted several times each month. Reservations are required for a top-to-bottom tour.

Both museums are overseen by the Arizona Aerospace Foundation and are governed by the board of trustees. They are a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization that rely on visitors paying admissions, for trams and AMARG tours, as well as what they spend in the museum stores. They also rely on memberships and contracted events to pay to restore and acquire exhibits.

The museum opened to the public on May 8, 1976. In early 1982 the first hangar on the site was completed. A second was built in 1987, a third in 1992, and a fourth in 1994. In 2012, the museum collaborated with artists, in The Boneyard Project, to place some abandoned aircraft on display as canvases for art.

During 2015, Boeing donated to the museum the second 787 aircraft to be built. It is exhibited in the colors of the 787 customer. In November 2016, Orbis International donated their first McDonnell-Douglas DC-10 Flying Eye Hospital to the museum, after receiving a second DC-10 from FedEx. The DC-10, which was the oldest flying example of its type at the time of its donation, is being restored for display at Davis–Monthan Air Force Base.[8]

"Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, 
is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Medina Dam

 

2.06.19-The Medina Dam…Not to much to say about this venue. We came, we saw and we left.

The history of the Medina Dam below is from the :© 2019 Medina Lake Preservation Society.
got Medina Dam History

The historic Medina Dam was completed in 1912 and Medina Lake was filled by 1913. The dam is a historical landmark, registered by the Texas Historical Commission and the American Society of Civil Engineers. The lake is approximately 18 miles long and three miles wide at its widest. The surrounding hills are composed of mostly fractured karst limestone covered in ash juniper, oak, persimmon, black walnut and (occasionally) madrona trees. Towering cypress grows near the Medina River and its tributaries. Medina Lake, combined with the Diversion Lake below the main dam, create the single largest recharge source for the entire Edwards Aquifer.

The Medina Lake Dam was designated a state historical landmark in 1976 by the Texas Historical Commission and was entered into The National Register of Historic Places at that time. The dam was also recognized as a civil engineering landmark in 1991 by the American Civil Engineering Society and a plaque with that designation sits on the dam, alongside the Historical Commission plaque. Today, the area that is known as Mormon’s Bluff was the site of one of the first Mormon colonies in Texas. A third plaque sits on the dam recognizing this settlement.

Three books have been written specifically about the history of Medina Lake, the first by the Reverend Cyril Matthew Kuehne, originally published by St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, entitled “Ripples From Medina Lake”. This book is currently being reprinted by the Castro Colonies Historical Society in Castroville. It is available at the Castroville Chamber of Commerce.

“Everything we were, we carry with us. Everything we will be, is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet.” pjgrenier



Geo. WH Bush Pres. Library

To view the Journal for JANUARY click on this link goto January Journals…or click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.
HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
7. Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
8.  Feb. 1st Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
9.  Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (71m)
10. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
11. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
12. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
13. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x 13 nights

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The bold and italicized text below is taken from Wikipedia Web Site. For a virtual tour of the Library and Museum click on this link then go to the bottom of the Web Page this link will take you to: goto Bush Library and Museum tour

The George Bush Presidential Library and Museum was dedicated on November 6, 1997, and opened to the public shortly thereafter. It was designed by the architectural firm of Hellmuth, Obata and Kassabaum.

The Bush Library and Museum is situated on a plaza adjoining the Annenberg Presidential Conference Center and the George Bush School of Government and Public Service. It is administered by NARA under the provisions of the Presidential Libraries Act of 1955.

 

 

 

 

 

(This is a quote to be found on one side of the Museum wall.)

The mission of the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum is to preserve and make available for research the official records, personal papers, and artifacts of President George H.W. Bush, to support democracy, promote civic education, and increase historical understanding of U.S. national experience through the life and times of George Bush.

(the entrance to the Museum and Library.)
The textual archives contain more than 44 million pages of personal papers and official documents subject to the Presidential Records Act, as well as personal records from associates connected with President Bush’s public career as Congressman, Ambassador to the United Nations, Chief of the U.S. Liaison Office in China, Chairman of the Republican National Committee, and Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. As in all NARA presidential libraries, records are housed in acid-free storage (Hollinger) boxes in a balanced humidity and temperature atmosphere. The archival storage area houses 13,000 cubic feet (370 m3) of records and the library has a National Security vault holding 3,500 cubic feet (99 m3) of Presidential Records. In addition to memoranda, speeches, and reports found in the textual collection, there is an extensive audio-visual and photographic archive.[citation needed].

Its classroom is the first of its kind in the Presidential Libraries network. The classroom can be used by student groups as a computer learning lab or as a traditional classroom. It is the Bush Library and Museum’s educational mission to inform and enrich learning for all ages about American history, the role of the presidency in general with special focus on the administration of George Bush.

(Vestibule as you enter the Museum/Library)

In 2011, the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation was given an overall score of 2 out of 4 by Charity Navigator.[1] The CEO was listed on that site’s “10 Highly Paid CEOs at Low-Rated Charities”.[2]

(Entrance to the garden area resting place for President Bush, wife Barbara and Robin, their child who died as a youngster. This is the spot, on the day of President Bush’s burial where the cameras and reporters could not enter or go any further.)

The Day the Wall Came Down by Veryl Goodnight, a 1997 statue of horses leaping over pieces of the actual Berlin Wall, stands on the plaza of the library. It depicts the fall of the wall in 1989, when Bush was president.

The museum has just under 17,000 square feet (1,600 m2) of permanent exhibit space and 3,000 square feet (300 m2) of temporary exhibit space. Permanent exhibits draw on the best of the museum collection to visually convey the essence of George Bush’s life and public service career and to illustrate historical events of this period in American history. Changing exhibits explore topics on the Bush Administration, American history, American Presidents, etc.[1]

(Below the graves and markers for the Bush family)

“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, 
is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

 

Johnson Space Center

To view the Journal for JANUARY click on this link goto January Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear to be missing, using your “refresh” button helps them reappear.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
7.  Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
8.  Feb. 1st Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
9.  Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (182m)
10. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
11. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
12. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
13. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x 13 nights

*****************************************

1.28.19-Johnson Space Center-We awoke around 7am anxious for this day for visiting the Johnson Space Center. Carla is feeling a little better but still sneezing from time to time. After a light breakfast and proper clothing to counter the 37 degree weather we were on our way. Traveling through Houston was a whit-knuckle experience.

This group of fly-overs wasn’t even the biggest, felt bad we missed that shot. It had a series of 5 levels high. Below is the Houston skyline. Tragic n this shot was light, I never want to travel I-45 through the city again.


Yea, we made it. The drive here was definitely an “E” ticket experience. Carla, Abby and I were fortunate enough to experience a 747 carrying a Shuttle back to Kennedy many years ago. It was such a rare event that, many times, the 747 pilot would do his own creative flight plan before landing. Many times flying north and south along the coastline to be a little boastful.


This would be our first of several venues today, buying tickets and viewing the Space Center Museum. Below are a few shots of the inside of this venue.

I kind of  liked this picture below, a roadmap to the galaxy. Then another shot of the complex.

Below this guy is explaining the technique of going to the bathroom, you know #2, in space. It involves the use of suction. I won’t go into details on this but will let you use your imagination. Below this same guy tried to get this volunteer to drink Space Station generated water. Must I go into detail as to where the Space Station gets this primary source of water. The volunteer did not oblige the host in trying this highly purified water. Did you really think he would?

 

Above  is an animation showing a candle (on the left ) as it would glow on earth and the same candle, on the right and how it would glow on the space Station, in outer space. The question here is why! A tour of the complex by tram will be next.

 

Yes, we can thank Disney for creating “waiting stalls” even at JSC, but the line was short. These are long horn Texas steers grazing on the JSC property. I did not hear the entire story but I think they had to be permitted as part of the buy-out or lease deal on the property.


Some of the research buildings on the property, for got their particulars.


We’re in the last building shown above where they build stuff and the train on it. The big white drums are actually, I think, living modules for the astronauts. Below is unique. The “green” capsule, lower left corner is actually the Russian capsule that our astronauts come home in from the Space Station. Our government pays $2M for a ticket for this ride.


Pictures above and below are about the “Orion” capsule. This is the new phase of our space program. Almost feels like we’re going backwards, especially after experiencing the Shuttles. Very much like the Mercury capsules more window, but yet no bathrooms or exercise room.


Once again, these are “living quarters modules” that will some day go back to the moon or Mars.


Above at the top of the picture are the many awards students have won as they worked on actual space projects t this NASA center. Some of their achievements can be seen on the floor, mostly in the realm of robotics. Below, I know, nobody here looks very busy, I agree.


We’re off again to see what’s in the next building, the Saturn Rocket building. Below see the bikes. These are the original bikes dating from the beginnings of the Space Center. Schwinn comes in once a years and refurbishes them for the years to come.

On this plot of soil trees have been planted with placards in commemoration of those that have contributed greatly to the program. Below, I just liked the picture.


Some information on the Saturn Rocket. Your computer can enlarge the information.