Circle Printing



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I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

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HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need. NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


9.23.2019-Circle Printing

The last six months I’ve been working diligently trying to convert all our Journal and Blog files for the last six years to Word.

Circle Printing is locally own and operated
by Jan & Monica Gunter for 7 years. Below is the forgotten member of this mom and pop team, Rusty, their dog. These folks do it right the first time every time which is probably why they do business from all corners of the country as far East as Maine.

Today I finished 2018 so it was off to the printer today. Circle Printing in Greensburg, IN, just outside of Batesville. Jan and his wife are making it happen for us in under 24 hours.

Circle Printing, 130 W Main St, Greensburg. IN 47240….812.663.7367

For more information go to www.circleprinting.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

I don’t know about you but seldom do I ever find a company that will do what ever it takes to get my business. Mostly it’s a take it or leave it attitude from those big box stores. Circle Printing is a not that small a business and it’s a little congested but they make it happen as I wanted it to happen. On a thumb drive I gave him five-files containing over one-thousand pages of Journals and blogs, and all he did was smile and told me he should have my books ready by 3pm tomorrow. In fact he asked us to stay around while he downloaded the 2014 book and put it together so we would be certain to be happy.

I’m still working on 2019 and he volunteered that if I email it to him he’ll download it and bind it just like the other books he’s done and mail it off to us at whatever address we give him.

Wow! Business the old fashioned way.

You’ll never feel you have enough money to retire,
however, once you feel you have enough money,
will you have enough time?

Tillamook Creamery


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

7.20.2019-Tillimook Creamery in Tillamook, OR

 

 

 

 

 

This is the Tillamook Creamery. It is located in, where else but, Tillamook, OR. Every year this museum/creamery is viewed by over 1.3-million people.

 

 

 

 

 

Everyone touring this complex will go home with a great admiration on the Tillamook attitude towards farming and cattle in particular. For us city folks we’ll learn how intense caring for cattle is on a daily basis. I lost the picture I had of a mechanical scratching wheel designed for the pleasure of the cattle they care for.

 

 

 

 

 

As you walk through this self-guided tour you will be taught the process of making cheese. This learning process is presented in pictures, kiosks and videos.
In our travels what we see, more than anything else, are farms. We both have a great deal of admiration for all those farmers who take so much pride in the areas where their cattle feed and live each day. Sadly so many times we see cattle meandering around in twelve inches of mud. It probably makes no difference in the milk they produce but in all fairness, with all the land most cattle farmers have, they should have more consideration for their animals.

 

 

 

 

 

The Tillamook Factory produces more than 170,000 pounds of cheese each day. It also produces and makes available over one-million pounds of cheese to be sold to the public each week.

Above is the Octopus. Tillamook cheese is aged in forty-pound-cubes for periods of 60 days to, as many as, five-years. Up to fifty-million pounds of cheese is stored and aged at this location on average.

 

Above is the tasting bar. Several flavors and types of Tillamook Cheese are available for consumer consumption in hopes you’ll not go home empty handed. At every venue you’ll almost always find an eatery and a gift shop. This eatery is huge offering items from burgers to ice cream to its guests.

 

 

 

 

 

Our trip here was very exciting and educational. If you’re in the area take time to visit this location.

Travel to Hardin, MT


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

8.08.2019-1st stop would be Idaho Falls, ID.
Last thing I saw last night was a caution light on the dash saying “Oil level low-Check!” It would have to wait until tomorrow morning, to dark right now. Windows open , Scooty slept through the night, Carla is sleeping like a log and here I am at 4am thinking about the oil level in the coach. Just like last night, it’s to dark to do anything else but think about the situation. To make a long story short I did find the 5W30 motor oil and we did make it to Idaho Falls, safely.

 

 

 

 

 

The sky, as you can see, was always a little threatening, but nothing came of it, at least not today. In the next picture you can see what it looks like to be homeless, as we and many others are, and enjoy the lifestyle of free stays at a Walmart.

 

8.09.2019 Next stop Butte, MT -now Bozeman, MT

 

 

 

 

 

What an early start, around 8am, rarely happens. Then we checked out the GPS and it projected we’d be in Butte around noon, give or take. 

 

With a 300-mile trip on Saturday. So we decided to extend the travel today 85-miles to Bozeman, MT.

  

 

 

 

 

 It was all highway with, once again, some very awesome sights. As we travelled West we caught a glimpse of the Rocky Mountains to our south, not to mention thousands of acres of corn, wheat and potatoes. Below, I thought, might have been a plant to convert corn to the oil for possibly fuel, but no! It was a oil distillery. They get their oil on trains from Canada to make fuel to be distributed throughout this region. Below, we often see, are these huge water falls. This picture does not do it justice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see from the picture above, the rain did finally come. Not a heavy downpour, just a constant heavy drizzle. For some reason the coach seems to love this type of weather. It moves us along with just a slight hum from the engine. It could almost put you to sleep; not good for the driver, however! We did arrive in Bozeman just minutes before 2 pm, cold not ask for anything better, considering the distance.

8.10.20`19-Sat. travel to Hardin, MT for a 4-day stay.

 

 

 

 

It was a very easy ride, almost boring, if it had not been for the awesome views along the way. It is so hard to believe that our farmers manage such big farms, and, by the way, who eats all this corn and wheat they produce.

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve seen farms that must have been over one-thousand acres of just corn alone. Wheat and hay was  produced as far as Bozeman, MT  with the assistance of vast irrigation systems. As we pushed forward, closer to Billings, MT we saw farms producing hay and wheat with no irrigation systems at all. I believe we were told that these acres were producing “dry-wheat.”

 

 

 

 

 

All they do is let it grow then cut, bail, stack and watch the next generation of wheat to come out of the ground. Livingston, MT was just before Billings. The rolling hills were awesome. Tom Brokaw has a farm here, and we think it might be for sale. As we arrived in Billings at the Petroglyphs cave we saw this sign.

 

 

 

 

 

The inducement to take this walk was this paved walkway, that would soon change.

 

 

 

 

 

We did make it to the first of the three caves. I don’t think either of us were that impressed with the pictographs; we’ve seen better. In the picture below is a cropped version of a cave painting.

 

 

 

 

Above possibly a gator or crocodile. I’ll let you decide what the picture in the upper right might depict. I see a fish in one spot. Like I said we’d seen drawings from the ancients that were much better. Definitely not his or her calling.

 

 

 

 

 

Upper left just right of center you’ll notice three black spots. Those were added in the last fifty years to indicate the level of the floor before the archeologists began tearing things apart. Many artifacts were discovered in this cave. But we have two more caves to investigate.

 

 

 

 

 

The pathway has become either gravel or crushed stone, still not bad to walk on. Upper left is our new destination. cave #2. Dead center in the picture below is where we saw the first cave. The second unimpressive cave is below right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To make this long story short the walkway to worse and we decided to pass on cave #3 and start back to the coach. You can barely make out the coach in upper right pic but it’s there, we just have to walk back on this gravel path. This was the first time we’d taken the coach to a venue, usually we get to the campground and drive back but the campground in Hardin is forty-five miles from here and we were going right by it so we coached it to this venue, possibly never again. From here were going to travel to the Grandview Camp and RVPark. Not much to brag about but, nonetheless, I gave it it’s own blog.

Mountain Home, ID&RVPark


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

 

8.01.2019 Preparing to travel
Can you believe, the end of another month. At the same time we’re preparing for our next move. I’ve pulled the tanks and filled the fresh water tank so we’re 90% ready to go. Our next destination is about 450 miles from here so we’ll be doing an Walmart overnight in Island City, OR our last time to experience this gorgeous state. We’ll leave Island City on Saturday and arrive in Mountain Home, ID for a 5-day stay. All I know about this will be an RPI resort and will cost us ten-dollars a night and they warn it’s dusty there, still cheap enough. We will leave Mountain Home on the 8th of August. During our stay we plan on experiencing more petroglyphs from the past. As hard as I’ve tried I’m still one-blog behind, but will make it happen soon. We said good-by to Dawn and Dick, a very young couple possibly in their early forties, in their Zephyr motorhome. It made our couch look like a classic from the past, but it’s home to us.

8.04.2019-Sunday-Would be wash day.
The washers and dryers here come in at $1.00 and $1.25 per load cheapest we’ve seen in months if ever. Does not mean that they’ll be fully dry but it’s cheap. I relocated some of my winter clothing to a closet chest below and found my bathing suit. Yes, swimming might be on tap later today. High 90’s today but the coach is almost cold inside. I really thought today was going to be one of those do-nothing days but out of thin air Carla asked if we could goto the pool here at Mountain Home RVPark. So off we went, expecting to do not more than waddle around and talk to each other but what a surprise. We had the pleasure to meet the Thorne family; so awesome to be young as they were.  Not only that but their son Chase visited this Web Site, something neither of my kids ever do, and left a comment. It will be a long time before we forget the pleasant visit we had with this family. When we got back to the coach who shows up but Chase and a family member. Chase had our Web Site on his tablet, something I did not have until I was 70. They all enjoyed Scoots and Scoots was nice enough, this time, not to run and hide from them. Thanks to this visit we now have a few more ideas on venues to visit while we work our way East and eventually back to Florida. For now it’s back to my Sudoku.

 

 

Salmon River and Cookout*


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


 

 

7 .21.2019-Sunday-River Walk and Fire
Nothing much planned for today.

Shortly after breakfast we began a walk to discover the Salmon River, adjacent to the park. Then try to find our way back from the river relax at the coach.

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And now we have dinner on our picnic table and cook a steak on the fire. We Topped the evening off watching a documentary on understanding the Mueller Report.

 

 

Mt. Hood Village RVP


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


7.19.2019-Mt. Hood Village RVP

In the above picture is typical of the last few miles of our drive here from Portland, OR. Once we left Portland it was one small town and another, mostly on 4-lane divided highways. Navigating small towns in a big bus does not make for a relaxing day but we made it without a scratch.

I definitely have nothing to complain about concerning this campground. The trip was only around fifty miles but we ended up taking almost two-hours to get here. They call it a village, rightfully so. This is also a Thousand Trails Encore Property; which means it’s a free stay. Our site is embedded in trees so tall they’re almost immeasurable. Just to recap Thousand Trails (TT). By joining TT you are a member in Equity LifeStyle Properties, offering all forms of camping, vacation get-always and rentals overseas. This campground is the best we’ve seen from TT. There are nicer properties but we enjoy the more rustic, back to nature venues.

This is our site and yes the coach is back there in the shadows. We also have a corner lot which means we possess real-estate. Even on the driver’s side of the coach we have and almost unobstructed view. This campground, unlike the Pacific City Encore, looks like heaven. In this Village we have Wi-Fi, Verizon cell service, sewer, no satellite but we do have cable TV; Awesome! Everything you hoped Pacific would offer but did not get.

I’ll definitely have more to say on this in the days to come.

Travel to Portland, OR


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


Travel to Portland, OR

7.16.2019
Wow! to quote that famous movie line; “We’re Back!.” It’s been three arduous weeks hibernating in Pacific City.

We endured no Verizon phone service, no Wi-Fi, no sewer and no in-house bathroom conveniences for our last three days. The bathroom thing arose from the limitations on our black-water holding tank. When full, or almost full, you must forgo using it. It’s usually good for 5-6 days and it did last 5 days then we were delegated to the campground facilities. It wasn’t a big hardship since the facilities were about a one-minute walk from the coach, but it did rain a lot and then there’s always those 3am emergencies, but we survived.

Our newest rant is an old one; our driver’s-side slide-out. It’s acting up a bit. It does work properly. It’s just that the bottom of the slide, on one occasion, dislodged mostly because of the terrible campground roads at Pacific City, so I didn’t want to chance an incident on our travel to Portland. Just a quick picture on this beautiful city of tall glistening building and multi-level over-passes.

At the local Ace Hardware in Lincoln, OR, I think, I had two 2×4’s cut to the exact depth of the slide, which was twenty-nine inches. The measurement was perfect and when we retracted the slide we wedged one board on each end of the slide between the slide bottom framework and the interior wall of the coach just to insure it did not wiggle lose as we traveled today, and the slide behaved nicely.

 

 

 

I almost forgot to mention Scooty’s new-found friend. We’ve seen this fella several times, it suffers from a very damaged ear on the top of its head. Scoots never gave it a name, but since we had a bunch of left-over cat food that Scooty refused to eat, we fed it to, let’s call him “Peter.” Peter ate a full-bowel within ten minutes. So we put out a much fuller bowl and when we woke the next morning, our travel-day, it was just about cleaned up. Before we left we put out another bowl and can only hope the future inhabitants of this site will take pity on him as well. How did the saying go; “feed the hungry and less fortunate.” The author probably didn’t have Peter in mind, but it worked for us.

29th Wedding Anniversary


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


mm
7.14.2019- Anniversary Dinner 29

 

Yes, I remembered! Unlike those that are encased in a stick and stone building, we cannot indulge in frivolous, but relevant, gifts. We settle for a better than average dinner and the, all important, anniversary cards. We decided to try the Riverhouse Diner in Pacific City. You must remember Pacific City is a village, actually a fishing village. We both indulged in a Calamari meal in a excellent sauce. Carla had a pannacotta desert and I played it safe with a Cheesecake dish. The restaurant was small, but once again Pacific City is small.

I counted tables and chairs and could only come up with seating for twenty-four, but that’s alright, I like small. In this picture is about half the dining room.

 

 

From the exterior it isn’t that impressive but the food was very good. The calamari was a little on the salty side but good nonetheless.

 

 

 

This is the river it borders. Throughout the meal we saw this young family kayaking up and down in front of the restaurant, very relaxing.  

Haystack Rock, Pacific City, OR*


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


 

 

7.12.2019-Cape Kiwanda or Haystack Rock

This is the beach in Pacific City. It’s known as Cape Kiwanda.

 

 

 

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What the beach is really known for is the rock that sits within site of the beach area. This looks like just another rock sitting in the water but this rock is over one mile off the coast. On top of that it’s well over three-hundred feet in height.

 

 

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This is a view of this beach town from the road approaching the beach. So much like Cape Cod.

 

 

 

 

Above, thanks to cropping, is a sand surfer. this is a very big mound of sand and must be steep enough to use it as

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Below is a boat. More specifically it’s a “Dory.” The Dory is configured to make it a boat which can handle the strong surf this beach has year-round.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.12.2019-Pacific City, OR-

The biggest store in town was Chester’s’, about the size of a Walgreen Drug Store. I’m not knocking it. With what they’re charging the Chester’s are doing quite well. Corn at Walmart 5-for $2,00. Chester’s was having a special, 80-cents an ear down this week from $1.25 an ear last week. Doesn’t that inspire you to buy a 5-acre mini-farm and supply Chester’s every week! Below are pictures of the Pacific City Beach Area.

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South Beach Fish Market*


Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

 

TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)

Aug. 7th  Butte, MT
Aug 10th Billings, MT
Aug.12th Wyoming somewhere find  RVP
Aug 14th Rapid City, SD
Aug 29th Forest City, IA


06.23.19-Sunday-South Beach Fish Market

Sundays are very much like Saturdays. The script has been reenacted on so many Sundays in our past, very much like many other families. A little shopping at Walmart then munch our way through the day with a nice but simple dinner to end the evening. Today was very much like all the Sundays of our past with a little twist at the end of the day. As I’ve mentioned a few times the last couple of weeks, we’re not exactly in the heart of Newport. In Newport is where you can easily find Wi-Fi and, most of all, cell phone availability. No, we’re about eight miles south of Newport over where many of the well know beaches can be found, like South Beach and Nye Beach. Today, however, we’re facing a count-down to Wednesday morning when we will depart this area and go to Pacific City. We’ve mentioned in the past we adhere, as much as possible, to a very simple and inexpensive lifestyle, but occasionally you have to do something different.

On each trip into town we travel past the South Beach Fish Market, I actually thought the name of the place was the Crab House do the outdoor billboards on the building. So today we decided to experience this roadside fish eatery. There are people waiting to enter all day long, so after a couple of games of Kings Corner we left the coach around 4pm to go eat. We no sooner got to the Ocean Highway didn’t the car begin  to handle funny, something was wrong. I got out and sure enough we had another flat. This was the second flat in two weeks. My brother Dennis, as he does each year, renews his and our membership to AAA. We hadn’t had the last flat fixed so now we had to rely on the donut tire. AAA estimated a one-hour wait and as promised he arrived in one hour. He had us up and going in twenty minutes.

The next stop would be the Fish Market. This is one of those eateries visible to everyone but whose reputation is best know to only the locals. It’s not very impressive, but what a menu. All the fish is fresh. Halibut, Shrimp, Chinook King Salmon, Prawns, Scallops, Tuna and Wild Fish, served in so many combinations you must allow an extra twenty minutes time to study the menu. Carla enjoyed Halibut and Scallops, which I help her eat and I partook of Calamari and Onion Rings. Our meals were awesome. Torty minutes later we were slowly driving our crippled car back to the campground. Needless to say, tires will be our primary objective tomorrow morning especially since we’re leaving on Wednesday.

 

Newport, OR (Waterfront)*


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

TRAVEL ITENERARY

May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)

Aug. 7th  Butte, MT
Aug 10th Billings, MT
Aug.12th Wyoming somewhere find  RVP
Aug 14th Rapid City, SD
Aug 29th Forest City, IA


6.21.2019- Newport, OR

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Newport is the largest city on the Central Oregon Coast with its remarkable history and rich cultural heritage.

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Newport was originally inhabited by the Yacona Indians who had lived in the region for at least three thousand years before the arrival of the first Euro-American settlers. During the establishment of the Siletz Reservation in 1855, Yacona Indians were relocated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many of these pictures have been posted to give our Abby some additional food for thought.

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This Historic Downtown is so comfortable. For me it takes first place for us to settle down to when the time comes for us getting off the road and hanging up the keys..

The 19th-century is a period when people who migrated from the different parts of the world discovered that Newport was a great destination for their businesses and prosperity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The picture upper right is about a slightly curved piece of glass with a slit in the upper portion to insert a picture for viewing. Does anyone print out pictures anymore? Maybe that’s why these have been discounted 50% from $60 to around $30 each.
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This is a resident kitten that’s a rescue cat. It took a lot for me to not bring it home with us. Although I don’t think the person holding the kitten would let it go.

In 1852, the schooner Juliet was stranded by storms on the Central Oregon Coast. Its captain and crew explored the bay and river and discovered oyster beds in Yaquina Bay. This great discovery and demand for oysters brought entrepreneurs and new settlers to the region. In 1863, two oyster companies were opened.

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Above left are a string of glass blowing kilns. They hold classes for those who might want to learn the trade.

.In 1866, a former soldier, Sam Case built the first hotel in Newport at the northwest of the Yaquina Bay to help accommodate the greater number of tourists. The building was named Ocean House after one of the best hotels in Newport in Rhode Island.

(The bold and italics’ text has been taken from: PDX History-The Oregon Encyclopedia)

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Had a chance to speak to the fisherman on this boat. Turns out the only reason he fishes is to keep his cat fed every day. He was fishing with no bait, and surprisingly, before we left him, he had caught a baby salmon.

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Sam Case continued with his mission of building houses and cottages. Later, on July 1868, he established the first post office where he became the first Newport postmaster. In 1868, the town was named Newport after a town in Rhode Island.

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The picture below right of the bridge leading into the historic district was, once again, for Abby to appreciate. Her art is centered around geometric shapes and patterns and I thought she’d get something from it.

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The picture lower right is weaving scarfs. She was nice enough to spend time with me explaining that she took a ten-week course in college to learn how to do this trade with many types of materials. Carla then came along and she had questions for her as well. So talented. These scarfs sell for sixty dollars each. Below left is a picture for the MacDougall’s our extended family. It’s a trade he’s been very involved with for several years now.

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More pictures and items for Abby’s sake. I would bet she and Michael would fit in just fine in Newport.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pictures below are those taken on our way into Newport. Out of order, I know, still trying to get a handle on the coding.


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Upper right; Carla is starting to get pretty corky on her picture taking abilities.

 

Birthday Celebration*



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING,
 you need,
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING!

6.06.19-Birthday celebration
Thank goodness it only comes around once a year. I heard from so many of the Ozdarski family and got a text or two from my kids. The height of the day would be the excellent dinner Carla created. To say the least it was an Iowa feast.

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Earlier in the day we were greeted by these two inhabitants of the surrounding woods. Very few can boasts of enjoying scenes like this.

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Stuff, as I’ve mentioned in the past, is not part of our lives. But there’s no reason why we can’t enjoy an afternoon together, read a funny card or two and definitely enjoy an unusual meal. Even if I had to cook it myself these two Rib-Eye Steaks were going to make both of us very happy.

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I call this an Iowa meal. We have very close friends in Iowa, they’re really like family, and this is the way they eat more often then I could ever imagine. Steak, fries and great corn, from I don’t know where, rounded off this beautiful day.

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Oregon Observatory*



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)
Time to travel East

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The following text is from the Oregon Observatory Website.

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This small building was not what I was expecting. I thought we’d have to drive up to the top of a mountain then look into a many ton telescope, but no, not here. It’s personal. Workers and volunteers abound everywhere. Below, a view of the sun in mid-day, is exactly what you see in the “white telescope” you see a couple of pictures down.

The Oregon Observatory. Billions and billions of sights to see. When our roofs disappear we have the largest collection of telescopes for public viewing in the United States. Feast your eyes on faraway galaxies.

Brian, seen below talking to Carla, and an older gentleman Bill were so helpful in tutoring us on the use of their telescopes.

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Witness a meteor shower. Get a glimpse of globular clusters, nebulae and deep space binary stars, as well as our closest star, the Sun. There’s no better place than the Oregon Observatory at Sunriver.

The white telescope below is not outrageously expensive; around a couple of thousand dollars and the computer that locates the individual stars will cost you about six-hundred dollars.

All these telescopes plus another dozen in the back of the building are is use on Wednesday and Saturday evening for as many as two-hundred to as many as four-hundred guests to use. We visited during the day and returned in the evening to experience the telescopes. The roof on the building actually slide to the back exposing all these scopes to the open skies. If it wasn’t for the extreme cooler temperatures, around 55, it would have been a perfect day.

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Sunriver’s elevation, pitch-dark surroundings, and crystal clear air make it perfect for stargazing. At the Oregon Observatory, you won’t be lining up just for one quick peek. We have many of our telescopes set up for your enjoyment, from Tele Vue refractors to our 30-inch Newtonian. So if you really want to see the sights of Bend and Central Oregon, then we want to see you at the Oregon Observatory. Astronomy and rocketry conveniently located in Oregon’s most popular destination resort, adjacent to the Sunriver Nature Center.

Above is the dead trunk of a “dead tree,” but it’s only dead if it does not contribute to the environment. The, so-called dead tree trunk is called a “snag.” Wood-peckers and a variety of other birds will adopt this tree for their sustenance. They will knock themselves out pecking away on the wood and even find foods in the form of bugs and insects to eat.  In other words it’s either this tree trunk or the wood siding of your home.

All of this made possible by our supporters and friends. All telescopes, equipment and buildings made possible by generous donations. (The italics texts is courtesy of the Oregon Observatory Web Site.)

The amphitheater above is used to instruct audiences of all ages on the many constellations of our universe.

6.05.19-Oregon Observatory
This day began cool and got slightly cooler. A few days ago we dropped by the observatory and were greatly impressed. We will go back to the Observatory this evening, and it will be cold. The temp will not go above 55 degrees.

 

Mount Newberry Experience*



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING,
 you need,
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING!

6.10.19-Mount Newberry Experience
Mount Newberry is about thirty-miles down the road. I thought it would be a one-topic venue but discovered that we enjoyed the Paulina Lakes, the East Lake, Paulina Falls and finally Obsidian Peak.

Paulina Lake

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Once again we see the specter of this mountain range. This time were at a roadside viewing point. For the first time we also have the names of these mountains. The Sister Mountains, back in the 1800’s were once know as Faith, Hope and Charity. Bachelor, extreme left, appears to tower over the others, but in actuality it’s only just over nine-thousand feet. Two of the Sister mountains are over eleven thousand feet. The area on the topographical rendering is about the size of Rhode Island. This entire area was covered with lava rock from twelve to five-hundred feet deep.

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In the center of the picture above is the result of its blowing its top. Center of picture is Mount Newberry. When the incident happened it spread lava all over up to thirty miles away. Where Carla’s finger is, at the top of the picture is Sunriver, the town we are camping in. Once again, Center picture are those two blue areas. Right now we’re visiting the pool of water on the left, Paulina Lake. Below are pictures of this area.

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Above is a blow-up of the top of Mount Newberry. It took thousands of years but after the initial blow-up the insides of the volcano actually fell into itself. This formed a “Caldera.” This is very similar to what happened to the Volcano involved with Crater Lake. In the case of Newberry we got two lakes, one a little higher than the other.

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The mountains above have no relation to what were to see today. Mount Newberry is our challenge for today. It was back about 30,000 years ago that Newberry began to grow. And grow it did, reaching over 12,000 feet at one time. Then around 10,000 years ago, as one youngster put it, it blew its top.

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Above is Obsidian Peak. You cannot drive to the top but there is a trail you can hike to it. Below is the Paulina Lake Lodge, closed at this time.

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Below another picture of the Lodge and above you find a Telephone Booth. When did you ever see one of these.

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Now we’re off to experience East Lake, the blue body of water in the picture at the top of the blog.

East Lake:

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Now were off to Obsidian Rock:

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. This is a special type of lava flow. Below the path isn’t great but I have a feeling it won’t last.

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 This is a section of the flow. The depth here is about 200 feet. (Below) This is what I was afraid of. Not only is it very rough and laden with outcroppings of rocks, it’s going up, I mean very high up.

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Need I say we’re still going up and I see no smooth super highway ahead. Below is a BIG example of Obsidian Rock. This type of rock, if you look closely is almost “glass-like.” In fact it is glass. Commercial glass is 99.7% pure silica (sand). The rock in the picture below is 77% silica but still qualifies it as being glass.

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I’m tired and ready to leave but we have one more stop. Above we saw a picture of Obsidian Rock. Below is a picture of the mountain we were walking around and it is a solid piece of Obsidian Rock about thirty-thousand years old.

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Paulina Falls:.

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We decided to put off viewing the lower point of the Paulina Falls until just before we leave. Here goe the National Park Service enticing us with this wide flat walk-way, I wonder what really lies ahead.

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The walkway did not disappoint, it actually got better and above is what we saw all the way up to the falls. Yes I said UP! Below  are the falls and it was well worth the uphill climb.
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Remember what a Caldera is? This is when a volcano goes dormant and in ten or twenty thousand years the sides of the top of the volcano slowly begin to fall into  itself forming a “bowl” or in the official language a “Caldera.” Remember this is the volcano that spilled lava over an area of Oregon the size of Rhode Island.

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Some of the beautiful natural views in this National Park.

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Now we’re working are way down from the falls to view them from below, like they’ll look that much more different.

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Above we’re looking DOWN the rough rocky barely visible trail and stopped to decide will it really be worth traversing this path. Below we decide not to pursue the journey and take everybody’s word on the fact that it’s a beautiful site. We’re older, NOT OLD, and we know it. No need to take chances, we do enough of that on a regular basis.

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Ah! the parking lot. I could go for a beer. A very nice day for sure.

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Bend, Oregon

Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING,
you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

******************************

5.27.2019-There was no thought of an eventual town or a city at the present Bend locale in those pioneer days. But on a spring day in 1900, there arrived on the present site the covered wagon of Alexander M. Drake, a Midwest capitalist, who heard of irrigation possibilities in the upper Deschutes country.

He founded the Pilot Butte Development Company, and the nucleus of Bend began with the construction of a lodge. Bend became incorporated by a vote of the people in 1904, with officers taking over their duties in January, 1905. A.H. Goodwillie was the first mayor.

The town of Bend, OR is really not just a town, more like a small city. Not as big as Orlando yet, but more like a Sanford or Melbourne, FL. You can find anything you want in Bend, the bigger cities only have more than one of everything. Actually Bend has four Ace Hardware Stores…Awesome! So  to take pictures of Bend is what you’d find in almost any town so you have to go to the outskirts of this town, namely Sunriver. In this town, just outside of Bend you’ll fine Lava Land. I believe I read that this county has four-hundred volcanoes of various sizes. Above is one of the bigger ones. I read that this entire county is built over dozens to about three-hundred feet of lava rock..

A Name for the Town Earlier, when Bend’s future was still uncertain, there was a controversy over a name for the new hamlet. In the late 1870’s, William H. Staats filed a claim on the Deschutes near the “Farewell Bend” Ranch (which had been obtained by John Sisemore from John Todd) and made a rival bid for travelers. Each maintained a stopping place and each for a time had a post office. .

Staats platted his town as “Deschutes.”  Some called the community “Staats.”  Drake favored the name “Pilot Butte” and a bid was made for “Farewell Bend.”  But officials in the Post Office Department in Washington, DC, decided Farewell Bend was too long and they finally approved the name “Bend.”  After Bend’s incorporation, it gradually absorbed Deschutes.

This is Mount Bachelor (I hope to have a better picture should it ever stop raining.). It to is just about ten miles out of Bend also in Sunrise, OR. The official address of the Mountain is in Bend, OR. Just a little info on this awesome mountain. The overall height of the mountain is just over 9,000feet. The volcano lies at the northern end of the 15-mile long Mount Bachelor Volcanic Chain, which underwent four major eruptive episodes during the PIE. (PIE, the Paleo Indian Era roughly about ten-thousand -years BC.) So its been dormant for quite awhile. Being about twenty mile west of Bend gives it its popularity as a major ski slope. It offers over four-thousand acres of skiable terrain. It is also the highest skiable lift at over eight-thousand feet ASL in both Oregon and Washington states. It is also known for its light fluffy dry snow. It has a reputation of being one of the largest ski resorts in the US. It also boast of its long ski season beginning at Thanksgiving and lasting well into May. Lastly it a beautiful, majestic Mountain to just look at. It is visible from some of the areas in this campground.

Form of Government Bend changed in 1929 from the council form of government to that of City Commission – Manager form, with three commissioners. George P. Gove was the first mayor under the new form of government, with C.G. Reiter as the first City Manager; the mayor being elected by the other commissioners from their own ranks.

The charter was later changed to require seven commissioners and in 1995 the Charter was re-drafted to change the title for the elected representatives from Commissioner to Councilor. The Mayor continues to be elected by his or her peers.

Des Chutes Historical Museum
Source: All About Bend, Oregon Compiled, edited and published by the League of Women Voters of Bend, Oregon May, 1967

Crater Lake

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

 


TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)
Time to travel East

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5.23.19-Visiting the Crater Lake venue was awesome. Our tip can be set up into three divisions. This is almost June!

Tripping to the Lake

Experiencing the lake

and the Fossilized Steam venue.

Just one of the many mountain views we experienced on our trip to Crater Lake.

A Cherished History

Crater Lake National Park is a place where you can experience diverse wilderness in a setting of breathtaking beauty. More than 7,000 years ago, a fierce eruption shook the 12,000-foot-tall Mount Mazama, triggering the mountain’s collapse. The area’s Klamath tribes witnessed the volcano’s eruption, and their histories include many stories about how Crater Lake and its features were created. 

This is a picture of Mount Thielsen.

 

 

 

In the hundreds of years after the eruption, rainfall and snowfall filled the crater and formed the lake. No streams run into or out of the lake – its levels depend entirely on precipitation, evaporation, and seepage. At nearly 2,000 feet, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States. That depth, combined with the water’s purity, gives the lake its remarkable deep blue color.

 

This is now what the top of Mount Mazama looks like today.

Above is the Welcoming Sign to Crater Lake National Park. Below is an Information Kiosk and, more importantly, behind it an outhouse.

As you can see snow is beginning to show itself on both sides of the road.

The entrance to Crater Lake National Park.

Above and below is the Administration Building. I wonder if they ever call a no-work day because the snow has buried the entrance?

The Visitor Information Center and, of course, Gift Shop. In this building we bought a couple of items and waited patiently for twenty-five minutes for the next showing of a movie on CL.

This is what the top of Mount Mazama looks like today. Before Mount Mazama blew its top it was over 12,000 feet ASL

On May 22, 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt signed the legislation that created the sixth national park in the United States, Crater Lake National Park. When you visit today, you can explore the fascinating volcanic features that date back to the lake’s formation.

This text was taken from the Crater Lake Website,

courtesy of the National Park Service.

In the early 1930’s the Crater Lake region received over seventy feet of snow. On average it usually gets around forty-four feet of snow.

Yup, I dared myself to stand upon a short stone wall to take this picture. To my right and left are signs stating “Stay-back.” On the lake side of the stone wall is snow, very slippery snow on a steep hill going into the lake. If you survived you might be in trouble with the law since no one is permitted to take a swim in this lake. Like would anyone be thinking of that as they were sliding down into the lake.

Yes! Here’s that wall that no one is supposed to breach.

 

In the center is Wizard Island. Elevation of the volcano, yes volcano. is 6940 feet ASL. This is a volcano within a volcano. As you have read the entirety of Crater Lake sits in a volcano. Below is a nothing picture of a car with Massachusetts plates carrying two bikes and a snow shovel, just in case.

 

Above behind the sign saying “road closed” are some very tiny people in relation to the height of the snow bank. Now, we’ve left the proximity of the Lake and traveled a short distance to the Rim Village Café and Gift Shop. For a change we had a bite to eat this time. Carla enjoyed a bowl of Minestrone soup and I a hot dog. Hindsight being I should have gone with the soup. Below are some of the picture from this two-story building.

Two ways to look at this! Either Carla is really short or that there’s a heck of a lot of snow behind her. Below we met an awesome couple Berry and Roberta Mullin. Not full-timers but they do travel in a Vistabule Teardrop Trailer. Below their picture is a picture of the Vestibule Trailer they have.

 

 

We’re both a little tired and it’s about 3pm, Scoots will be looking for her 5pm feeding shortly. We were not that far away from the lake when we happened across the Fossilized Steam Venue.

 

 

Who needs a telephoto lens when you can crop! Center of picture is a thousands year old fossilized steam structure. 

 

 

Tripping to Bend, OR

 

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


May / June ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
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Day 1-(5.13.19)-Tripping to Walmart in Burley,ID
We got a very good start to the day, 8:30 for a change. Carla took some very nice pictures along the way. Pictures coming up in a day or two.

We did get to the Walmart and had an excellent evening.
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We did a drive by on this beautiful lake, man made as you can see from the man-made dam. Below are remembrances from our canyon views.


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Awesome road-views never end.


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Today our snow-covered mountains are slowly getting fewer by the mile.


We both enjoyed the shadows made by the clouds over these hills. After 230 miles we finally reach Idaho.

Day 2-(5.14.19)- Tripping to Vale, OR (priv. Campground)

Arrived in Vale after a very uneventful, almost boring ride here. We were originally going to trip to Nampa, ID but the trip tomorrow would be 300 plus miles so we opted to extend this trip a little longer. Tomorrow’s trip will still be long at 260 miles plus but it’s better than what it was going to be. I’m trying to update the blog but the Internet service is really bad for uploading pictures so they will wait till tomorrow.


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We thought this was a lake but it’s more a reservoir for this town, a big reservoir. Below, it’s a difficult view but this is hundreds of acres of solar panels.
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Another long day of the road but we did get off before 2pm. We added about 30 miles to todays trip to reduce the 300 mile trip scheduled for tomorrow. The sign for Oregon (pronounced here as “Or-gan). Below we see how Oregon is reducing eye fatigue by enhancing it’s bridges and overpasses with a creative look. 

Day 3- (5.15.19)-Tripping to Bend, OR

We were up a little earlier than usual to attack this 260 mile trip to Bend, Oregon. Usually for on the road by 9:30, but today, we were on the go at 8:15. We left Vale, ID by viewing a number of murals, all depicting cowboys and Indians.


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We continue to view so many beautiful lakes. Just past this lake was another solar farm that was so big I could not even guess at the size.
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Below are a few images of the many picturesque views from the road. The farms were the industries the country is so proud of. From the road they look so pristine it almost  teases the viewer to be part of this industry.
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If you’ve noticed for the pictures above and below, there is very little traffic either coming or going. We did the trip on a 2-lane non-divided highway.

 

Tripping to Heber, UT

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING.

 

.
May / June ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

5.07.19-Tripping to Heber, UT

.What a beautiful day for taking a trip. The coach is humming away so nicely. We’re still plague with a problem with our two slides, but hopefully that will be resolved in a few weeks.


The purpose for this picture is two-fold. One for the beauty of these huge hills and mountains and second for the reader to visualize the height of these structures by viewing the car on the road in the bottom center portion of the picture, both above and below.

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I cannot imagine the millions of yeas it too to create the rock structure above. Below are twin tunnels for the railroad to get from one side of the mountain to the other. We will see these tunnels in several locations. In a few pictures you’ll see twin tunnels for the cars.

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We’re currently at the seven-thousand foot elevation, and therefore we find snow venues. The mountains well covered in snow are at the 12,000 foot elevation. Nice try for the wind-turbines but they’re not going around very fast. They do come with brakes to prevent them from moving to fast, but the turbines here are barely moving. They’re brakes should never wear out at this speed.

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We’re just entering the town of Provo. This is also the home of Brigham Young U. We’re about thirty-miles from Heber. This is one very awesome town very similar to El Paso, TX. Every franchise is represented here. Heber is not nearly this big, but it is growing fast. 

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I believe this is the Bingham Young University stadium. Below is the Bald Knoll Mountain range elevation over ten-thousand feet. This mountain rang can be seen from everywhere.

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.Above is the Bridal Vail Waterfalls just outside of the town of Provo.. This is an attraction we would normally take time to visit but now, having seen it from the road, we can just take credit for it. Below are the twin auto-tunnels I mentioned earlier.

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.I believe this is the Provo Lake Reservoir, a really huge lake.

Tripping to Green River, UT..

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.
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HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING.

.
March/April ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 layovers) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) x7n (654m)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

5.02.19-Tripping to Green River, UT

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It  isn’t  very  clear  in  the  picture  above, since I’m utilizing the poor-man’s telephoto lens by cropping the original picture. This is a “serious” cattle round-up of several hundred head of cattle. The purpose for the picture was the munchkin on the center horse. Boy or girl, not sure I was driving, but he/she could not have been older the ten…pretty awesome way to spend a day and possibly bonding with a parent. We were still passing cattle two miles from here. Sure beats watching grass grow.

This was on a plaque by, I think, the National Park Service (NPS),
posted at the scenic area stop.

“Humans have lived among these rocks and cliffs for longer than you can imagine. Archeological investigations conducted as part of the Interstate construction across the Swell during the 1970s and 1980s located over a hundred prehistoric sites.

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The sites show that hundreds of generations of Native American peoples inhabited this rugged land for thousands of years and in all seasons. Archeologists explored sites from the early Archaic Period of hunting and gathering about 9,500 years ago, up to historic ranching sites of the early 20th Century. People survived by hunting and gathering until about the time of Christ., when small-scale agriculture, dependent on corn, beans, and squash, was adopted.

We’re at a Rest Area for a few minutes and I had the chilling moment that the coach quietly began rolling down this steep road. Just popping in the tire blocks to assure my “moment” never happens.

Archeological remains of these farmers, whom we call Fremonts, include small settlements of pit dwellings, granaries, outdoor shaded work areas, hearths, storage pits, and trash mounds. the earliest evidence of farming on the Swell dates to about A.D. 500 at the Confluence Site.

 

Scenes from the Rest Stop. Below was a father/daughter team viewing also. He was visiting from Tokyo…Awesome! Just checked, coach has not moved!

This site provided important insight into the transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture in the region, and predated previously known agricultural sites by 200 years. Bows and arrows and ceramics were the technological innovations of this time.

Remember the name of these guys in the center of the picture?

Yes! Hoodoos.

Researchers found Fremonts sites in the Ghost Rock area, a few miles east of here, which is an upland environment and not well suited for growing corn. Study of the sites told archeologists much about the Fremont way of life, which included hunting and gathering year-round and farming at lower elevations along riverbanks.

 

Scenic views like this one above and below appear every couple of miles. Below, I’m sure you’re saying, snow again! NO! That’s salt. I hope to have a separate blog on “salt” soon.

It was a little over two-hours to get here but the scenery was well worth it. We’re staying at the Shady Acres RVP in Green River. Green River, as far as I’m concerned, is an oxymoron. The river is a muddy brown color.