Blowing Rock



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HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


10.17.2019-We visit Blowing Rock

Traveling the roads of North Carolina is always such a pleasure. I only wish I had the space and band with to post all the scenic views we experienced.

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Mountain tunnels. We came across quite a few of these on our Alaskan tour but these were the first we’d seen stateside.

The story behind the Blowing Rock from the BR Historical Society

Before 1752, when Moravian Bishop August Gottlieb Spangenberg visited the Blowing Rock area, the windy cliffs of the area were home to the Cherokee and the Catawba Indian tribes, hostile to each other, and the basis for the story of “The “Blowing Rock”. Two star-crossed lovers, one from each tribe, were walking near The Rock when the reddening sky signaled to the brave that he must return to his tribal duty, and the maiden urged him to stay with her.

Below I capture Carla exemplifying her youthful climbing skills. I’m very happy just taking her picture from a safe distance.

His desperation in choosing between duty and love caused him to leap from the edge of the gorge toward the rocks below, while the maiden beseeched the Great Spirit to bring him back to her. The famous winds of the John’s River Gorge blew her lover back into her arms, and this legend about The Blowing Rock is still told today..

Before 1752, when Moravian Bishop August Gottlieb Spangenberg visited the Blowing Rock area, the windy cliffs of the area were home to the Cherokee and the Catawba Indian tribes, hostile to each other, and the basis for the story of “The “Blowing Rock”. Two star-crossed lovers, one from each tribe, were walking near The Rock when the reddening sky signaled to the brave that he must return to his tribal duty, and the maiden urged him to stay with her. His desperation in choosing between duty and love caused him to leap from the edge of the gorge toward the rocks below, while the maiden beseeched the Great Spirit to bring him back to her. The famous winds of the John’s River Gorge blew her lover back into her arms, and this legend about The Blowing Rock is still told today.

You’ll never feel you have enough money to retire,
however, once you feel you have enough money,
will you have enough time?

Little Bighorn Battlefield



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.  
  NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


NEW Updates to the end of 2019

Aug. 10th Hardin, MT (RPIx4n)(500m)
Aug 14th Rapid City, SD (PPx14n)
Aug 29th Forest City, IA (Winnebago x5n)
Sept 3rd Cedar Rapids, IA (171m)
Sept. 17th Peoria, IL (177m)
Sept. 16th Batesville, IL (62m)
Sept. 25th Park City, KY(366m)
Oct 9th Knoxville, TN (224m)
Oct. 10th Lenoir, NC (186m)
Oct. 25th Yemassee, SC(269m)
Nov 1st Port Orange, FL (277m)
Nov. 5th Wildwood, FL (82m)
Nov. 26th Pompano, FL
Dec. 10th Christmas, FL
Dec. 16th Pompano, FL
Dec. 30th Wildwood, FL


8.12.2019-Little Battle of Little Bighorn battlefield

It was just a very short ride to the battlefield of Col Custer and Sitting Bull. This was a battle where Lt. Col George Custer was greatly outnumbered. The grounds here commemorate the valor of those involved in this battle.

8.12.2019-Custer State Park

Our visit to this battlefield, to me, was not a moving as, let’s say, Gettysburg. As always there’s always a gift shop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m not even going to try to sum up this battle, most know of it, at least. A great site to visit to refresh your memory would be

The battle of Little BigHorn

As you know Custer was very much outnumbered, possibly 10:1. Above was our host, a former history teacher, who gave us a awesome recount of all the events that took place and several locations on June 25, 1876. Below is the spot that Custer’s bother, Boston Custer, fell.

The grave marker with black facing is the spot that Custer was found after the battle. Directly in frnt of him would be his other brother Captain T. W. Custer fell during the battle.

A memorial to all who fought and died, at the battle of Little Bighorn. Below was our starting point for this experience and the spot we were enlightened by our host the history teacher, now Ranger. This would be his next to last presentation prior to his retirement from the National Park Rangers.

 

 

 

Petroglyphs and Carla’s Birthday*


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

 

8.05.2019-Petroglyphs of Celebration Park in Melba, ID.

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The Petroglyphs in these pictures are from Melba, ID. They are, however, found all over the country. The boulders found in this area date back over 15,000 years. The Petroglyph images go back to the 1300’s. Most pictures are primitive for the people living in this area at the time.

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Exactly what these images portray no one is sure. The inhabitants of this area were, most likely, had no knowledgeable of the Gregorian Calendar. Rocks exemplifying dots might have been the primitives trying to keep track of days, seasons or even marks indication each new arrival for that year. Below left is a star image and the mark in the 9 o’clock position is 0.06 degrees of true north but when the professionals calculate for shifts in the world crust the 9 o’clock marking is exactly focused on true north and is also aligned to the North Star called Polaris, the star you find at the tip of the Big Dipper that stays in the same position at all times.

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Above is a picture of Henry a Park Service Person. If it were not for him we would have gone home with a big feeling of disappointment concerning this trip. A quick look of the Snake River in this area. The inhabitants inhabiting this area centuries ago were not annual inhabitants. They would arrive in the late fall and leave the area in early spring. With no air conditioning yet, they had no incentive to endure the heat. Below left was a possible image of a sheep. The dots may be explained as their way to show shading on the animal, or possibly, a primitive method of keeping track of time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a very dry area with the great option of the Snake River for irrigation. The road picture is just a depiction of how desolate and even boring traveling some of these Idaho roads. On a positive note for Idaho, their roads are in excellent condition. In our stay here I’ve seen only on major pothole.  Below is the 8000 Series Precision irrigation system. It delivers water to very dry land masses. It will pivot at the beginning and send water through the piping at the top of the unit to a distance of 2800 feet, almost a one-half mile in length. It then pivots in a semi-arch very slowly covering hundreds of acres of land.

 

 

 

 

 

Carla’s Birthday:
We did finally get home a little after 4pm. We both needed some time to unwind. For dinner we had the usual, a salad, followed by a 4-ounce cheesecake, in place of a small birthday cake and finally one of Carla’s favorite movies; SAVING MR. BANKS. This was a movie on the origins of Mary Poppins. No pictures this year, maybe next year. We will to a nice dinner once we find ourselves in a bigger city with more restaurants to choose from.

 

 

The Multnomah Falls


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


7.30 2019-We visit Multnomah Falls

 

 

 

 

 

Multnomah is pronounced-Malt-no-ma. Regardless of how you pronounce it over two-million people visit this venue annually. Above, to the right, is the Columbia River. Below is the visitor center, restaurant and gift shop and more importantly restrooms. Also below is a far-away shot of the falls.

 

 

 

 

 

Above is a beautiful shot of the grounds leading up to the falls. Below on the left is the new bridge that spans the falls. The left is the original bridge made of logs; not sure when it was replaced.

 

 

 

 

 

It is very difficult to see, you might have to enlarge the photo, but half way up the hill you can see individuals climbing to the top of the falls. This waterfall is the second tallest in North America at 620 feet. Number one is in the Mount Rainier area and is a two-DAY hike to visit this fall, so very few have seen it.

In the past visitors arrived here by  boat train and even a raft. There’s always a gift shop.

 

Mount Hood Ski Resort


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


7.23.2019 Field trip to Mount Hood.

The Mount Hood Ski Resort is called Timberline. It’s elevation is at 8000 feet ASL  whereas the mountain itself is at 11,235 feet ASL. It is categorized as a stratovolcano; in other words, it’s not a solid rock or a big pile of dirt. It’s formed through layers of ash and lava.

 

 

 

 

 

This picture of Carla and old Smokey was taken at the Zig Zag Ranger station, right Zig Zag, I don’t know why. As we were traveling to Mount Hood, there it was, in the middle of the road.

 

 

 

 

 

Mount Hood is a potentially “Active” volcano. It has erupted only three times in the last 1800 years and the chances of an substantial eruption in the next thirty years is negligible, but not ruled out. For all purposes it is considered to be potentially dormant. The last eruption took place about 200 years ago.Above is a picture of just a small portion of the parking for this lodge. To the right is a picture of the many ski slopes the mountain offers. Timberline is the only lodge that offers “year-round” skiing in America. The highest and longest ski trail would start at the 8000 foot elevation.

 

 

 

 

 

Indoor pictures of the lodge. Not shown in the pictures are hundreds of really healthy skiers both young and older carrying skies, sleds and snow boards. It’s enough for me to feel even older than I am.

 

 

 

 

 

Timberline is populated with apartment and condos all over the grounds. It’s a playground for the rich. As we were checking out our purchases a group of youngsters were paying cash for their items and they had more hundreds and fifties in their wallets than I could count.

 

 

 

 

 

From this elevation you can see forever almost. We missed the first set of waterfalls but caught the second group. Below are just a couple of shots of how beautiful this area is. Not sure when we’ll be back, but for sure we will return for a longer stay next time.

 

 

Mount Newberry Experience*



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING,
 you need,
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING!

6.10.19-Mount Newberry Experience
Mount Newberry is about thirty-miles down the road. I thought it would be a one-topic venue but discovered that we enjoyed the Paulina Lakes, the East Lake, Paulina Falls and finally Obsidian Peak.

Paulina Lake

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Once again we see the specter of this mountain range. This time were at a roadside viewing point. For the first time we also have the names of these mountains. The Sister Mountains, back in the 1800’s were once know as Faith, Hope and Charity. Bachelor, extreme left, appears to tower over the others, but in actuality it’s only just over nine-thousand feet. Two of the Sister mountains are over eleven thousand feet. The area on the topographical rendering is about the size of Rhode Island. This entire area was covered with lava rock from twelve to five-hundred feet deep.

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In the center of the picture above is the result of its blowing its top. Center of picture is Mount Newberry. When the incident happened it spread lava all over up to thirty miles away. Where Carla’s finger is, at the top of the picture is Sunriver, the town we are camping in. Once again, Center picture are those two blue areas. Right now we’re visiting the pool of water on the left, Paulina Lake. Below are pictures of this area.

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Above is a blow-up of the top of Mount Newberry. It took thousands of years but after the initial blow-up the insides of the volcano actually fell into itself. This formed a “Caldera.” This is very similar to what happened to the Volcano involved with Crater Lake. In the case of Newberry we got two lakes, one a little higher than the other.

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The mountains above have no relation to what were to see today. Mount Newberry is our challenge for today. It was back about 30,000 years ago that Newberry began to grow. And grow it did, reaching over 12,000 feet at one time. Then around 10,000 years ago, as one youngster put it, it blew its top.

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Above is Obsidian Peak. You cannot drive to the top but there is a trail you can hike to it. Below is the Paulina Lake Lodge, closed at this time.

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Below another picture of the Lodge and above you find a Telephone Booth. When did you ever see one of these.

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Now we’re off to experience East Lake, the blue body of water in the picture at the top of the blog.

East Lake:

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Now were off to Obsidian Rock:

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. This is a special type of lava flow. Below the path isn’t great but I have a feeling it won’t last.

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 This is a section of the flow. The depth here is about 200 feet. (Below) This is what I was afraid of. Not only is it very rough and laden with outcroppings of rocks, it’s going up, I mean very high up.

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Need I say we’re still going up and I see no smooth super highway ahead. Below is a BIG example of Obsidian Rock. This type of rock, if you look closely is almost “glass-like.” In fact it is glass. Commercial glass is 99.7% pure silica (sand). The rock in the picture below is 77% silica but still qualifies it as being glass.

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I’m tired and ready to leave but we have one more stop. Above we saw a picture of Obsidian Rock. Below is a picture of the mountain we were walking around and it is a solid piece of Obsidian Rock about thirty-thousand years old.

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Paulina Falls:.

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We decided to put off viewing the lower point of the Paulina Falls until just before we leave. Here goe the National Park Service enticing us with this wide flat walk-way, I wonder what really lies ahead.

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The walkway did not disappoint, it actually got better and above is what we saw all the way up to the falls. Yes I said UP! Below  are the falls and it was well worth the uphill climb.
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Remember what a Caldera is? This is when a volcano goes dormant and in ten or twenty thousand years the sides of the top of the volcano slowly begin to fall into  itself forming a “bowl” or in the official language a “Caldera.” Remember this is the volcano that spilled lava over an area of Oregon the size of Rhode Island.

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Some of the beautiful natural views in this National Park.

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Now we’re working are way down from the falls to view them from below, like they’ll look that much more different.

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Above we’re looking DOWN the rough rocky barely visible trail and stopped to decide will it really be worth traversing this path. Below we decide not to pursue the journey and take everybody’s word on the fact that it’s a beautiful site. We’re older, NOT OLD, and we know it. No need to take chances, we do enough of that on a regular basis.

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Ah! the parking lot. I could go for a beer. A very nice day for sure.

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Lava Lands Visitor Center


Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING,
you need. 
  NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.



TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)
Time to travel East

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5.28.19-Tuesday-Lava Land and Lava River Cave
Finally no rain, a beautiful day around 65 degrees. We leave the coach about 9:30 and were on our way to Lava Land. It was both educational and informative. Take time to read the blog on Lava Land. We enjoyed a great visit to Lava Land and got are cardio workout by walking possibly about 3 miles.

When we arrived and I saw this mound of lava residue, I was awed at the idea of being so close to a volcano. Wrong! This was not a volcano, this was one of over 400 “vents” that were created some 10,000 years ago, more or less by the Newberry Volcano some, believe it or not, twenty-five miles from here. This entire area makes up the Newberry Northwest  Rift Zone.

This entire area within the 25 mile range of the Newberry Volcano became very active about sever-thousand years ago. Vents were created by this volcano for the purpose of releasing gases, steam and lave from below the earth. This particular vent here in Sunriver, OR is about five-hundred feet in height. When it was first formed it was pointy (a lava dome) but after many active years the top of the vent caved in as you can see in the picture above.


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The Newberry Volcano is not actually  visible in the picture above but if you can locate the TWO patches of snow and/ice Newberry is in the center of these two patches of white. Once again it’s over thirty miles from here. The Newberry Volcano is Oregon’s largest volcano and hopefully we’ll have close-up pictures of it in a few days when we visit it. Back 7000 years ago it’s lava flow and vents, as I mentioned earlier, extended as far out as forty miles, possibly as big as the state of Rhode Island, I’ve read. The creation of Newberry did not happen overnight. Over the course of 400,000 years through many eruptions, it continued growing taller and bigger.  Eventually, after the eruptions stopped some 7000 years ago the top of the volcano did collapse within itself forming a “Caldera.” This Caldera now covers over seventeen square miles and has two lakes which we hope to visit in the future. These lakes are Paulina Lake and East Lake. Below is a view from the top of this vent mound looking down. All that black stuff is volcanic ash from 7000 years ago.
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Above we decide to set out and walk the rim of the vent depression you saw in picture below. The depression at the top of this butte is 17 square miles and to walk around it is over a quarter mile in distance. The area is just to vast and big for a regular lens. Picture above is courtesy of Wikipedia.org.

This picture is about all you can capture with a 55 mm lens. The cavity in the center drops over 150 feet.

Above, once again, they are not volcanoes, just buttes or vents courtesy of the Newberry Volcano. For the most part they are all dormant except Newberry. It still exerts vents with steam coming from it and warm water lakes. Below is the view from the road of the volcanic rock/lava from Newberry from 7000 years ago. it looks as pristine as if it were only a few days old.
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In the picture above is a topographical rendering in the Visitors Center of Newberry Volcano with its two lakes, Paulina and East Lake. Carla has her finger on the spot that were currently at, Sunriver, some 30 plus miles away. All the green stuff in this picture is how the lava spread out those 7000 years ago and the area it covered. The thickness of the lava buildup goes from a few dozen feet to more the 500 feet in some locations.
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Mazama refers to “Crater Lake” from a previous blog the end of May. To the left is a refresher picture of Crater Lake. Crater Lake is a dormant volcano which is why the water in the lake is a constant 45 degrees.

 

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This is a volcanic rock from this area and the description is below.

Carla is talking to one of the rangers at the Visitors’ Center.
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Lava River Cave, Bend, OR

Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING,
you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

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5.28.19-Tuesday-Lava Land and Lava River Cave

Finally no rain, a beautiful day around 65 degrees.  The Lava River Cave is only a few miles from Lava Land. We really enjoy caves and caverns and this one should be one-of-kind and it was. I’ll have a blog on this as well.

Only a few minutes ago we were at the Lava Lands venue. Now we’re going underground; a lava river cave. Above we arrive and we’re properly dressed, we thought. Below our next experience always begin with our first steps. We begin by walking down probably fifty to sixty feet to the opening of the cave.

This section leading to the cave entrance was also part of this enclosed cave structure however the upper portion of this section collapsed into itself.

This should be an awesome experience. This cave and former canal we’ve been told is a mile in length. They’ve told us to allow about two hours for this trip. Below the opening  to the river cave. Did you know that back one-hundred-thousand years ago, more or less, the lava flowing through this cave would have reached over 2000 degrees F.

Ah!  The entrance. Yes, we just entered the river cave. To get to the cave bottom we’ll have to walk down 150 steps in total then we get to walk the cave. It’s getting very cold.

 Above is a metal walkway. This made me happy, I’m not very fond of walking over a rocky floor. The metal is ice-cold but the metal path is great. Below that’s ice on the rocky floor of the cave. From here we walk cautiously over the rocky floor, yes, the fancy metal walkway left us about one-hundred feet ago and we’re left with only a very cold metal rail for safety and balance, but that will soon change. Within a few minutes even this would leave us not to mention it is so dark in here you cannot see your hand even if it was touching your nose, and did I mention, it’s freezing.

 

Above is what we’ll be walking over, the rocky floor of the cave.

Ah, you say the metal walkway…NO! Once we passed the ice patch in the lost picture we also lost the assistance of the metal rail. This is now getting seriously dangerous so in the picture above you see us departing this venue. If it looks fairly bright in the picture above it’s because of a family of eight each with a light. We did about one-tenth of a mile but not much more, the walking was just to dangerous. Below, just as seeing the entrance in the beginning, seeing the entrance now gave us assurance that we would survive this ordeal. We would not recommend this outing to anyone especially a family with young children. If you should attempt this cave bring a very BIG and powerful light. One light for two individuals will not cut it. I was extremely disappointed with this experience.

Crater Lake

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

 


TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)
Time to travel East

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5.23.19-Visiting the Crater Lake venue was awesome. Our tip can be set up into three divisions. This is almost June!

Tripping to the Lake

Experiencing the lake

and the Fossilized Steam venue.

Just one of the many mountain views we experienced on our trip to Crater Lake.

A Cherished History

Crater Lake National Park is a place where you can experience diverse wilderness in a setting of breathtaking beauty. More than 7,000 years ago, a fierce eruption shook the 12,000-foot-tall Mount Mazama, triggering the mountain’s collapse. The area’s Klamath tribes witnessed the volcano’s eruption, and their histories include many stories about how Crater Lake and its features were created. 

This is a picture of Mount Thielsen.

 

 

 

In the hundreds of years after the eruption, rainfall and snowfall filled the crater and formed the lake. No streams run into or out of the lake – its levels depend entirely on precipitation, evaporation, and seepage. At nearly 2,000 feet, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States. That depth, combined with the water’s purity, gives the lake its remarkable deep blue color.

 

This is now what the top of Mount Mazama looks like today.

Above is the Welcoming Sign to Crater Lake National Park. Below is an Information Kiosk and, more importantly, behind it an outhouse.

As you can see snow is beginning to show itself on both sides of the road.

The entrance to Crater Lake National Park.

Above and below is the Administration Building. I wonder if they ever call a no-work day because the snow has buried the entrance?

The Visitor Information Center and, of course, Gift Shop. In this building we bought a couple of items and waited patiently for twenty-five minutes for the next showing of a movie on CL.

This is what the top of Mount Mazama looks like today. Before Mount Mazama blew its top it was over 12,000 feet ASL

On May 22, 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt signed the legislation that created the sixth national park in the United States, Crater Lake National Park. When you visit today, you can explore the fascinating volcanic features that date back to the lake’s formation.

This text was taken from the Crater Lake Website,

courtesy of the National Park Service.

In the early 1930’s the Crater Lake region received over seventy feet of snow. On average it usually gets around forty-four feet of snow.

Yup, I dared myself to stand upon a short stone wall to take this picture. To my right and left are signs stating “Stay-back.” On the lake side of the stone wall is snow, very slippery snow on a steep hill going into the lake. If you survived you might be in trouble with the law since no one is permitted to take a swim in this lake. Like would anyone be thinking of that as they were sliding down into the lake.

Yes! Here’s that wall that no one is supposed to breach.

 

In the center is Wizard Island. Elevation of the volcano, yes volcano. is 6940 feet ASL. This is a volcano within a volcano. As you have read the entirety of Crater Lake sits in a volcano. Below is a nothing picture of a car with Massachusetts plates carrying two bikes and a snow shovel, just in case.

 

Above behind the sign saying “road closed” are some very tiny people in relation to the height of the snow bank. Now, we’ve left the proximity of the Lake and traveled a short distance to the Rim Village Café and Gift Shop. For a change we had a bite to eat this time. Carla enjoyed a bowl of Minestrone soup and I a hot dog. Hindsight being I should have gone with the soup. Below are some of the picture from this two-story building.

Two ways to look at this! Either Carla is really short or that there’s a heck of a lot of snow behind her. Below we met an awesome couple Berry and Roberta Mullin. Not full-timers but they do travel in a Vistabule Teardrop Trailer. Below their picture is a picture of the Vestibule Trailer they have.

 

 

We’re both a little tired and it’s about 3pm, Scoots will be looking for her 5pm feeding shortly. We were not that far away from the lake when we happened across the Fossilized Steam Venue.

 

 

Who needs a telephoto lens when you can crop! Center of picture is a thousands year old fossilized steam structure. 

 

 

Experience Petroglyphs ???

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING.

March/April ITENERARY

May 2nd Green River, UT at Shady Acres x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 layovers) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (layovers TBD) x7n (654m)
June 5th Newport, OR at Whaler’s Rest
June 26th leave Newport, OR
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May 4th- Experience Petroglyphs ???

Hope I peeked your interest. pet·ro·glyph, NOUN  are rock carvings, especially prehistoric ones. For more information on this read the May 4th Blog on it.

23 April, 2014 – 23:26 aprilholloway

The haunting rock art of Sego Canyon – extra-terrestrials or spiritual visions? 

The sandstone cliffs of Sego Canyon are a spectacular outdoor art gallery of petroglyphs painted and carved by Native Americans peoples over a period of around 8,000 years.  They are characterised by more than 80 imposing and haunting life-sized figures with hollowed eyes or missing eyes and the frequent absence of arms and legs. Some claim that the mysterious figures are evidence of alien visitation in our ancient past, while scholars maintain that the strange beings represent shamanistic visions produced in trance-like states.

Above are four Mesas. In about a half hour or so we will be driving down a road in-between mesas two and three. Below is that road. It feels and looks like no one has been here in years.

Evidence of human habitation in Sego Canyon dates back to the Archaic Period (6,000 – 100 BC).  But subsequent Anasazi, Fremont, and Ute tribes also left their mark upon the area, painting and chipping their religious visions, clan symbols, and records of events into the cliff walls.

 Below is the only wild-life, a young calf, we’ve come across in the last two weeks.

The rock art of Sego Canyon can be characterised according to a number of distinctive styles, and time periods.  The oldest art belongs to the Archaic period and dates to between 6,000 BC and 2,000 BC.  Some of the most spectacular examples of rock art in the Southwest are attributed to Archaic people. They were nomads, who hunted large and small game animals, and collected and processed wild plants. They did not build permanent habitation structures, but lived in caves and in small brush shelters built in the open.

Above the road does not get any better. Below is the reason for our being here.

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Within the Archaic period and beginning around 4,000 years ago, we see the Barrier Canyon Style rock art, a distinctive style of art which appears mostly in Utah, with the largest concentration of sites in and around the San Rafael Swell and Canyonlands National Park, but the full range extends into much of the state and western Colorado. Barrier Canyon Style rock art panels are mostly pictographs (painted) but there are also several petroglyphs (pecked) in the style.

Above is our looking back. We appear to be going downhill. For this reason, I’ve deduced, the Fremont peoples lived with a source of water. Back a couple of thousand years ago this area might have been totally flooded and this could have been a fairly deep lake, a good source of fish. Once we get closer to our objective our path becomes very primitive.

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Fremont petroglyphs in Sego Canyon. Photo source .

Beginning 1300 AD and lasting until 1880 AD, the Ute people inhabited the region of Sego Canyon and carved their own style on the cliff faces. Prior to the arrival of Mexican settlers, the Utes occupied significant portions of what are today eastern Utah, western Colorado, and parts of New Mexico and Wyoming.

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The Utes were never a unified group within historic times; instead, they consisted of numerous nomadic bands that maintained close associations with other neighbouring groups. The historic Ute rock art is identified and dated by the horse and rider figures.

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Above and below are the reasons for our visiting this venue.

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Horses were introduced to North America by the Spanish in the sixteenth century. Other figures, or elements, painted in red and white on the panel include a white bison, a human figure with leggings, several large human figures, and large circles believed to be shields. The Ute people lived freely throughout western Colorado and eastern Utah until about 1880, when they were forced onto reservations.

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Extra-terrestrials or spiritual visions?

Advocates of the ancient astronaut theory suggest that the strange figures of the Barrier Canyon style rock art depict extra-terrestrials that once visited Earth. They point to the large, hollow looking eyes and the triangular shaped heads as evidence that the figures were not human.  However, others, like researcher Polly Schaafsma (1999) say that they represent shamanistic art associated with ritual activities of the Archaic people. Ms Schaafsma points to the fact that the ‘spirit figures’ are frequently shown holding snake forms, and their torsos sometimes incorporate water/life-giving symbols. The presence of these types of relational (figure/animal) motifs is considered to be evidence that there was a shamanistic tradition alive, at least during a certain period of time, among these Western Archaic people.  So what accounts for the unusual features, such as strange eyes, legless bodies, and what appears to be wings?

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A close-up thanks for cropping.

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According to Ms Schaafsma, shamanic practitioners, with the assistance of various spirits, were said to have the ability to travel to celestial realms and the underworld, in order to communicate with ‘purveyors of power’.  Hallucinations and visionary experiences characterise the shamanic trance experience, often provoked by the use of hallucinogens.

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Ute rock art, 1300 AD. Photo source

“With the aid of spirit helpers, tutelary deities, and divine or semi-divine beings, these otherworldly voyagers contact ancestral and supernatural powers in the interests of curing, fertility, divining, successful hunting, battle exploits, and weather control,” she wrote in a paper on the symbology of the Barrier Canyon rock art.

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Universally, shamans have communicated their extraordinary experiences through art. Are the Sego Canyon pictographs and petroglyphs another example of this?  No one really knows for sure what the images represent or why they were painted. The god-like, imposing and fantastical figures etched onto the cliffs of Sego Canyon remain an enigma and the true meaning behind them may never be unlocked.

Featured image: Petroglyphs in Sego Canyon. Photo source .

By April Holloway

References

Sego Canyon Petroglyphs – Science Views

Trance and Transformation in the Canyons – by Polly Schaafsma

The Barrier Canyon Rock Art Style – by David Sucec

Traces of a Lost People – Smithsonian

Barrier Canyon Style Rock Art – by James Q. Jacobs

 

 

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>Columns seen at the bottom of the picture are Hoodoos.BLUE

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Dennis’ B’day & Arches Nat’l Park

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.
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HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

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MAY-JUNE ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at Shady Acres x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 layovers) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (layovers TBD) x7n (654m)
June 5th Newport, OR at Whaler’s Rest
June 26th leave Newport, OR
*****************************************

5.03.19- Dennis’ Birthday-Arches

Yes, Dennis’ birthday. No! We did not forget. He did receive our presents in time and enjoyed both cake and pie during his special day. For us we got an early start and travelled an hour to experience Arches Canyon. We did and were so very impressed we the experience.

By 9:30, after congratulating Dennis, it was off to Arches..

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The full purpose of the picture below is for the reader to appreciate the awesome height of these mountainous size in relation to the car in the picture as well.


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.In the picture above is a view of the half-mile roadway to get to the entrance to the park. This is the Park Avenue Trail. As we have seen this year and years past the National Park Service does an super jog of making so many of these monuments so accessible.
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I have over three-hundred pictures of mountainous structures we’d seen on this visit..


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Below is our first “arch” structure. (Center of picture).
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Balanced Rock coming up.
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.Below another arch, in the center of picture. This blog is basically a pictorial on Arches, so they will get redundant eventually.
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Both up and down are more arches. Can you find the arch in the picture below?.
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Arches, Arches everywhere.
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It was a good walk but the sight was well worth it, not to mention the beautiful parkway, thanks to the NPS..
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. Three-hundred-million years ago this area, as well as most of the country, was covered with over ten-thousand feet of water, snow, ice and when it all began to melt, a million years later the friction of the water flowing past the sandstone structures took on very beautiful designs. Over the course of the three-hundred-million years the deep waters andice came back many, many times...

Below Delicate Arch coming up..
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.Delicate Arch was just to long a hike so we chose to present a picture in place of the real thing..

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.Once again I must rely on the poor-man’s telephoto lens, the cropping option. Below, we’ve reached the end of the Arch parade, at least for us. One more awesome site coming up.

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..Fiery Furnace coming up! This is going to be a pretty good size walk, only hope the vision is worth it. You noticed the walk begins by negotiating a series of stone steps leading to an original walkway, not the kind the NPS provides..

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The tall narrow rock structures are called “fins.”

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Devils Garden coming up next:
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Above is a small section of the Devils Garden. Devils Garden are rocks and cliffs that are saturated with iron.
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We’re about half way back to our final stop and we have a look at the arrival road.
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As always, there’s always a gift store. Yes, we made a purchase. Below a Ranger explains to Carla the cause of the heavy coloring in the rock formations.

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The next few pictures are from a movie at the Visitor’s Center. The arch below was just to long a walk to see in person.
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Above is another look of Hoodoos in the Winter time.
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.Above and below are from the movie and are Winter scenes. Our visit to the Arches National Park was awesome. Accessibility was another big plus as well, as one who trips over himself walking in a parking lot.

 

Antelope Canyon (pictorial)

 

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.25.2019 ANTELOPE CANYON TOUR

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Courtesy of WikiLeaks

Upper Antelope Canyon is called Tsé bighánílíní, ‘the place where water runs through rocks’ by the Navajo. It is the most frequently visited by tourists for two reasons. First, its entrance and entire length are at ground level, requiring no climbing.

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Second, beams or shafts of direct sunlight radiating down from openings at the top of the canyon are much more common in Upper than in Lower.

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Beams occur most often in the summer months, as they require the sun to be high in the sky. Winter colors are more muted. Summer months provide two types of lighting.

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Light beams start to peek into the canyon March 20 and disappear October 7 each year.

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Antelope Canyon is visited exclusively through guided tours, in part because rains during monsoon season can quickly flood the canyon. Rain does not have to fall on or near the Antelope Canyon slots for flash floods to whip through, as rain falling dozens of miles away upstream of the canyons can funnel into them with little prior notice.

 

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On August 12, 1997, eleven tourists, including seven from France, one from the United Kingdom, one from Sweden and two from the United States, were killed in Lower Antelope Canyon by a flash flood. Very little rain fell at the site that day, but an earlier thunderstorm had dumped a large amount of water into the canyon basin, 7 miles (11 km) upstream.

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The lone survivor of the flood was tour guide Francisco “Pancho” Quintana, who had prior swift-water training. At the time, the ladder system consisted of amateur-built wood ladders that were swept away by the flash flood. Today, ladder systems have been bolted in place, and deployable cargo nets are installed at the top of the canyon. At the fee booth, a NOAA Weather Radio from the National Weather Service and an alarm horn are stationed.

Despite improved warning and safety systems, the risks of injuries from flash floods still exist. On July 30, 2010, several tourists were stranded on a ledge when two flash floods occurred at Upper Antelope Canyon. Some of them were rescued and some had to wait for the flood waters to recede. There were reports that a woman and her nine-year-old son were injured as they were washed away downstream, but no fatalities were reported.

 

  

Bryce Canyon

 Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

TRAVEL ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.19.2019 Bryce Canyon Park part of Zion.

This article is Courtesy of the National Park Service
Bryce Canyon National Park lies on the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south central Utah.

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Bryce Canyon National Monument (administered by the U.S. Forest Service) was originally established on June 8, 1923 to preserve the “unusual scenic beauty, scientific interest, and importance.”

The Visitor’s Center

On June 7, 1924, the monument’s name was changed to Utah National Park and it was transferred to the National Park Service. On February 25, 1928 Utah National Park was changed to Bryce Canyon National Park. Subsequent legislation enlarged the park to its current size of 35,835 acres.

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The route we will follow up to, but not including MM11. Site 11 is still impacted with snow.


Bryce is famous for its unique geology, consisting of a series of horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters carved from the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah.

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The erosional force of frost-wedging and the dissolving power of rainwater have shaped the colorful calcium-rich mudstone of the Claron Formation into bizarre shapes including slot canyons, windows, fins, and spires called “hoodoos.”

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Columns seen at the bottom of the picture are Hoodoos.


Tinted with colors too numerous and subtle to name, these whimsically arranged rocks create a wondrous landscape of mazes, offering some of the most exciting and memorable walks and hikes imaginable.

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As much as I like to pretend that Carla and I are climbing cliffs and leaning over them as well, it’s not true. What you see above is the type of climbing and walking we do most of the time. The National Park Service walkways are not generally this nice or this big, but they are paved


Ponderosa pines, high elevation meadows, and fir-spruce forests border the rim of the plateau and abound with wildlife. This area boasts some of the world’s best air quality, offering panoramic views of three states and approaching 200 miles of visibility. This, coupled with the lack of nearby large light sources, creates unparalleled opportunities  for stargazing.


This Canyon is named after this couple, they discovered it and brought it to the attention of the public. Ebenezer and Mary Bryce.>….


One of the first questions people ask when visiting the rugged wilds of southern Utah is, “Who would live here?” The answer is, “Many different cultures over thousands of years have foraged, hunted and survived in this wilderness.”

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This self guided tour we’re on for ten miles is divided into
individual sites and views. Without going into more detail than
necessary I’m attempting to entice you with a small smattering of images along this trip


Historic Resource Study
Introduction: Small by National Park standards, the 56.2 square miles of Bryce Canyon National Park occupy the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south-central Utah. The park is not a canyon. Rather, it is a spectacular series of more than a dozen amphitheaters, each of which is carved at least 1,000 feet into the chromatic limestone of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. …


Just a few more pictures to end this blog. Red Canyon and Bryce Canyon are as exciting, if not more exciting, than the Grand Canyon.


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Tripping to one of the last viewing locations. Needless to say were going uphill and our elevation, right now, is over 8000 feet./font>


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To the NPS’s Credit, this is what the viewing trails used to look like before they retrofit them with concrete


x x x


The final leg of our tour is around nine-thousand foot level and yes, snow abounds everywhere.



“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

orange-red

blue….

 

Red Canyon-Dixie Nat’l Forrest

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

TRAVEL ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.19.2019-Red Canyon, Dixie Forrest, Utah

We’ve been on the road about thirty minutes and are now approaching Red Canyon, which is part of the Dixie National Forrest and Zion National Park.


This area has had inhabitants for thousands of years. As in all areas like this water is at a premium if found at all. For them each day was a challenge for survival.

In the above picture the tall sentinel formations are called Hoodoos. Eventually Mother Nature will wear away the sand-stone rock substance at the bottom and in-between the two hoodoos.


This is not a Natural Bridge, definitely man-made. Same for the tunnel you will see in a couple of images.


Man-made, but it sure looks cool! Hard to believe the rock formation below.

Kanab, UT

 

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.19.19-GOOD FRIDAY-EXPERIENCE KANAB CANYONS

Good Friday is a day of fast and abstinence. The last few days we’ve done so much “hanging around” spending another day doing nothing wasn’t that appealing. It is a special day and TV is usually at a minimum or nothing until at least 3pm. We decided to experience His majesty wonders by viewing the canyons in Kanab, UT.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kanab (/kəˈnæb/kə-NAB) is a city in and the county seat of Kane County, Utah, United States.[4] It is located on Kanab Creek just north of the Arizona state line.

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The road-side views on our way to Red Canyon were awesome.

 

This area was first settled in 1864 and the town was founded in 1870 when ten Latter-Day Saint families moved into the area.[5] The population was 4,312 at the 2010 census.

Red Canyon Area:

We even had the opportunity to drive through two sand-rock tunnels to find ourselves here. The name “Red Canyon” comes from the heave concentration of iron minerals in the sand-rock itself.

Kanab is situated in the “Grand Circle” area, centrally located among Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, Bryce Canyon National Park, the Grand Canyon (North Rim), Zion National Park, and Lake Powell.

Bryce Canyon Area:

The Bryce Canyon tour encompassed several stops in different locations. Each location offered a unique canyon character from the previous location, please read the blogs on these.

Other nearby attractions include Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park, the privately owned Moqui Cave, and the largest animal sanctuary in the United States, Best Friends Animal Society.

Some additional pictures of Bryce Canyon:

 

Locals refer to Kanab as “Little Hollywood” due to its history as a filming location for many movies and television series, prominently western, such as Stagecoach (1939), The Lone Ranger, Death Valley Days. Gunsmoke, Daniel Boone, El Dorado (1966), Planet of the Apes (1968), Mackenna’s Gold, Sergeants 3, WindRunner: A Spirited Journey, Western Union (1941), The Desperadoes (1943), In Old Oklahoma (1943), Buffalo Bill (1944), Westward the Women (1952), Tomahawk Trail (1957), Fort Bowie (1958), Sergeants Three (1962), Duel at Diablo (1966), Ride in the Whirlwind (1965), The Shooting (1966), and The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976).[6][7]

 

Courtesy of Wikipedia

 

Bryce Canyon National Park lies on the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south central Utah. Bryce Canyon National Monument (administered by the U.S. Forest Service) was originally established on June 8, 1923 to preserve the “unusual scenic beauty, scientific interest, and importance.” On June 7, 1924, the monument’s name was changed to Utah National Park and it was transferred to the National Park Service. On February 25, 1928 Utah National Park was changed to Bryce Canyon National Park. Subsequent legislation enlarged the park to its current size of 35,835 acres.

Bryce is famous for its unique geology, consisting of a series of horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters carved from the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah. The erosional force of frost-wedging and the dissolving power of rainwater have shaped the colorful calcium-rich mudstone of the Claron Formation into bizarre shapes including slot canyons, windows, fins, and spires called “hoodoos.” Tinted with colors too numerous and subtle to name, these whimsically arranged rocks create a wondrous landscape of mazes, offering some of the most exciting and memorable walks and hikes imaginable.

Ponderosa pines, high elevation meadows, and fir-spruce forests border the rim of the plateau and abound with wildlife. This area boasts some of the world’s best air quality, offering panoramic views of three states and approaching 200 miles of visibility. This, coupled with the lack of nearby large light sources, creates unparalleled opportunities for stargazing.

 


“Everything we were, we carry with us. Everything we will be, is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet.” pjgrenier


 

Kolob Canyon Trail

View Journals – select “Journals” from above for the drop-down menu.

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.11.2019

Kolob

Late Summer Storm in Kolob Canyons

This text is courtesy of the National Park Service


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Awesome scenery don’t you think?

 


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Welcome to Kolob Canyons
The Kolob Canyons section of Zion National Park is located at Exit 40 on Interstate 15, 40 miles north of Zion Canyon and 17 miles south of Cedar City.

 


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 A five-mile scenic drive along the Kolob Canyons Road allows visitors to view the crimson canyons and gain access to various trails and scenic viewpoints.

 

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Even this kind of path isn’t that bad, if only it were not always going uphill.

 

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Here in the northwest corner of the park, narrow parallel box canyons are cut into the western edge of the Colorado Plateau, forming majestic peaks and 2,000 foot cliff walls.

 

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The sign says one-half mile but it honestly felt like two miles. Below,
Yea, we have walking sticks also, in the car.

 

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Whether you come to view the panoramic landscape from our scenic drive, hike into one of our majestic canyons, or begin a multi-day adventure into the Zion Wilderness, Kolob Canyons has something special for everyone to experience.

 

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I’m coming!!!

The NPS evidently found its nice walkways being drowned out by heavy downpours. To try to eliminate the problem they set up the path in square block allowing a space in between each square block for water to pass through… ingenious!

 

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Kolob Canyons Visitor Center
All guests are required to stop at the Kolob Canyons Visitor Center to show an Interagency Park Pass or pay the Zion National Park entrance fee.

 

 

If Carla looks a little tired right now, you’re right, I think we both are.

Wilderness permits can be obtained here for backpacking campsites
and canyoneering routes in the park.

 

 

 

There is also a bookstore operated by the Zion Natl Park Forever Project.

Did you notice we’re still going uphill!

 

 

 

The views are so awesome it takes you attention off the job at hand,
walking without tripping. This is the reason we opted not to walk the Bright-Angel  path to the bottom of the grand canyon. I can think of one or two other reasons as well.

 

 

 

These are the paths I don’t get excited about. A couple of years ago I would not have thought twice about this type of challenge, but not any more. Now I live with a fear of tripping over something or even my own two feet.

 

 

 

Did I mention we’re both getting a little tired of going uphill!!

 

 

Yup, still going uphill. On the bright side,
we’ve been told we’re almost there.

 

 

Carla finally reaches the top, I follow right after her.
There is another peak and observation point
but we’re just going to take their word on the views from there.

 

 

 

As you can see we’ve begun our final leg of this venture, the walk back.
It’s been an awesome experience, but we’re both anxiously looking fort our car.

 

 

The trip down is steep and carries it’s own trepidations, once again, tripping and falling.

 

 

 

Remember these guys? I won’t say any more. In a few minutes the car comes into view.
Ah! The ride home, heavenly!

 

 

 

You’ll have to blow it up on your computer to read the captions in the picture, but in short, it says that everything up on these hills might and someday will fall down to the ground. The left side of the picture is about a 900 ton rock that came down and fell on a truck. Nether the truck nor the driver did well that day.

 

 

Up and down this five-mile stretch of road you’ll find
road crews creating observation points and laying down
new pavement for generations to come to enjoy this venue.

 

 

 

Home is only a thirty minute ride but we enjoyed every mile of it.

 

 

“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

 

Zion National Park

To view Journals select “Journals” from the drop-down menu, and select the month and year.

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
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4.08.2019- Monday- Zion National Park

 

Trip to Zion

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This is Quail Lake.  As you can see from the wall that confines it, it’s man-made. For an area that does not boast of many lakes, natural or man-made, this one is huge.

 

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Just a few scenic views of the area and the road to Zion. Our first stop will be Zion Lodge.

 

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We are approaching Zion National Park.

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Zion Lodge and check in center. It takes us about thirty minutes to get here from St. George. We’ll check in with this ranger, who vacations in Orlando, FL, using Carla’s park pass, and make our way to the Visitor’s center.

 

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National Park Service is working diligently to create a venue very similar to what we saw in the Grand Canyon. It’s work in progress but so much has already been accomplished, especially the roads, walking areas and parking venues.

 

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Work construction going on in preparation for the Summer crowds. The roadways are very well marked as well as walkways and trail ways.  We’re in a double-car shuttle here taking us to our first stop.

 

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Just a very small number of views we experienced on our trip to our first stop.

 

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The grotto will be our first walking tour. Yes, we did a lot walking today.

 

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The Grotto.

It’s just a place, no lake and no waterfalls. But it’s not next door. No Uber either, foot power only.

 

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So many vistas. I had over three-hundred pictures but could only use fifty of so.

 

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Every one of these venues are accessible but it’s always an uphill climb to get there. The path began as being very generous, that will change in a few minutes.

 

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Above is what the path will turn into. A gravel walkway with stone, roots and narrows to contend with.

 

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I mean to find out the significance of this tree. The bark on this tree has been twisted either by wind or water.

 

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Move unbelievable vistas. This is all part of the Grotto.

 

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A Ranger homestead. There are several in the area. Below is  shuttle bus, just missed it. They come around every 15-20 minutes.

 

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From here we’ll look for trail signs for our next venue; Weeping Rock. n the meantime enjoy some of the many mountain views around here until we can figure out where we go next, it’s around here somewhere.

 

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Okay, we found the trail. As always it goes uphill first.

 

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Weeping Rock Trailhead

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In the distance you can see our destination, Weeping Rock. It’s about and quarter-mile away and, as always, it will be an uphill climb.

 

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The National Park Service does such. Great job of making g these venues accessible. No much anyone can do about the uphill climbs. The paths are passable but not always paved. Everyone must pay attention to where they place their feet and a walking stick is always helpful. Above you can see primitive steps and below a state of the art people bridge, to move the millions of visitors along.

 

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The trail, in sections, is very passable and as you can see below we do get to our destination.

 

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Looking away from the falls you can appreciate the effort the NPS has gone through to allow large groups of people enjoy these beautiful destinations. Below, however, it’s time for us to turn our attention to going back and catching another shuttle to take us to our car.

 

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The best part of leaving a particular venue, in most cases, is that it is usually a downhill walk. Be mindful, however, walking a steep grade downhill produces its own set of precautions.

 

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Finally we get to that beautiful bridge again and those primitive steps.

 

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We take one last look at Weeping Rock and say good-bye. It’s time to try to find the trail to the Temple of  Sinawava.

 

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Temple of Sinawava / River Walk


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The above two climbers are climbing the rock mountain shown below. If you  look closely you might see two very small speck at the dead center of the picture; that’s them.

 

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Every hike begins with our trying to find the trail to hike. It’s not generally that difficult but just wanted he text to fit the picture. Below is Sinawava. t looks close but it’s about a very slow quarter-mile hike.

 

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Yup, we found our path. Carla takes the first steps. Below is Sinawava also.

 

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This begins with the Riverdale. We’ll be walking along the Virgin River.

 

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We cross the Virgin River and yes, Carla is looking a little tired. A great deal of walking today, and we’re feeling it. In the next few pictures are scenes of the mountains we be seeing on our walk.

 

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The Lower Emerald Pool

 

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“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier