Giraffe Ranch



HAPPINESS,
is to have EVERYTHING,
you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.



02.19.2020-Wednesday- Giraffe Ranch

We awoke this morning with great optimism, our first filed trip of the 2020 Travel Year. The weatherman appears to be on our side, low humidity and mid to high eighties. We will visit the Giraffe Ranch which is owned and managed by Les Salisbury and wife Elena Sheppa.

 

Carla is standing in front of the Ostriches not just for looks. It goes without saying they are tall, they are! Almost six-feet or more. Shown above are Les and Elena, the Zoo-Keepers, owners, guides and, I’m sure, “fill-in when needed staff” as well. Carla and I know that position very well from experience.

   

This location is the registration office and gift store. Above you see the many expedition packages you can opt for. A family of four just ahead of us are writing a check for over fifteen-hundred dollars opting for an experience package much more expansive than what were opting for.

                 (Pantagonian Cavies)             (Lemur pops, I think) 

You’ll have to basically enjoy the pictures since there was no way I could record all the information that was imparted to us this day. Below is a family of rodents. Pantagonian cavies, Actually they are the fifth largest (in size) of all the rodents in the world. Did you know that a rabbit is a rodent…It IS!

There are many turtles on this ranch. These two will be joined by a third at the end of our trip. I’ll let you use your imagination as to what you think they might be doing. It’s Florida. Just wouldn’t be fair not to have a family of alligators on the ranch.

We will enjoy this forty-acres ranch in the comfort of the Safari-Jeep, actually I think it was a Chevy. It may not look like it but it was very comfortable. We were given behavior instructions in the beginning and the group were excellent in following these safety instructions throughout the trip. Carla examines the “bony” horns as our guides and owners give us a short history on the biophysical formation of these structures.

The Camel Expedition. This, I think, might be one of the more expensive day-trips. It’s not shown in this photo but  the owner-guide will give this tour on his Segway. Given the two options I’d probably opt for the Segway as opposed to a camel as well. As you can see in the picture below many of the animals are permitted to intermingle all over the ranch. The objective of the ranch is to provide, as much as possible, an environment similar to what the animals would be enjoying in a jungle.

Above is a portable chicken-coop. Up to two-dozen chickens will inhabit this domicile for 3-4-days then a worker will relocate it to another location which will continually give the chickens a clean and grassy home. I wish my brother Rich was reading my blog since I’m sure he’d be interested in this product.This is a far-away shot of possibly one-third of the cages and caged-walkways located on the farm. Even those animals not permitted to wander over  the farm in general are given rambling enclosed cages to exercise as much a possible.

This is a far-away shot of the Registration building and covered open visitors gathering place. These are the guys we came to visit; Giraffes! They are permitted to wander freely over a large portion of this ranch but have been passively trained to understand that when the Safari-Jeep appears it means it’s feeding time and time to mix with the visitors. Even I got into the act and tried my hand at feeding these awesome creatures.

 

As you can tell from the pictures they are not shy. They are surprisingly tame and friendly. Here you see Carla feeding just one of many that came begging for treats. Our guide, Elena, encourages us to get involved and feed as many as possible. She even turned the vehicle around to allow those on the other side to lend a hand as well. Carla just proof-read the blog and liked it but insisted it was light on Giraffe pictures, so I added a couple more. Sadly this has to be a distance shot. They look like deer but they’re not. In particular please notice the one that is third from the start; just a baby!

(Blackbucks, I think)

The baby, once again. We’re told that this species have a single mind-set; to follow their leader which is always a female-maybe they know something we don’t! Zebras! And others. If I recall correctly we were told that the Zebra to the left is still a youngster. Its’ stripes will develop after a while. A youngster asked if flies bother the Zebras? I never gave it  thought, of course they must! But NO, they don’t! The zookeepers tell us the the stripes of the zebras confuse the flies, so as a result, they just keep picking on the horses. The ranch has no horses but we did notice that flies have no qualms about annoying rhinos.

Enjoy the pictures since I do not remember who these critters are.

The ranch originally was a “dry”ranch with no lakes or small bodies of water to tap into. To acquire water they were forced to drill down over seventy feet to find the water they needed for the animals. Then a couple of years ago they had to endure a three-hurricane season. As a result they lost many of their big oak trees that could not survive the forty-eight inches of ground water the flooded the ranch. An oak tree shows the water line on one of the many trees that survived the ordeal. A small lake was the by-product of these storms and the lake, as you saw in a previous picture, which continues to retain a generous amount of water for all. Below is the Rhino. He and his kind are doomed for extinction possibly in our children’s lifetime. Zookeepers all over the world are trying to breed  and grow the heard in captivity but it’s a slow and expensive process. 

The zookeepers here have been desperately looking to do the same, however. Their rhino is experiencing a dermatitis as a result of inbreeding. This affliction is why they have not been given the opportunity to help the cause. Scientist feel their rhino is not a good candidate for breeding. Once again, just enjoy the pics. If you know what these animals are please comment and I’ll edit the blog with your information.

 

Another shot of the extensive caged and enclosed walkway system this ranch has provided for their  inhabitants.

Our first and most enjoyable trip of this Twenty-Twenty Travel season. Would we recommend this trip…absolutely! This is not one of those venues that are in your face every time you turn around. This is a mom/pop endeavor they have been working at for twenty-one years. Previously Les managed a large zoo for 21-years, so experience abounds. Elena, his wife, is equally credentialed. I have just tried to acquire more information on the Giraffe Ranch through Facebook but failed. We both really enjoyed this experience and will edit this blog as more information becomes available.

It’s been years since I’ve done this but for more information

on this beautiful experience go to: CLICK- Link to Giraffe Ranch

Little Bighorn Battlefield



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.  
  NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


NEW Updates to the end of 2019

Aug. 10th Hardin, MT (RPIx4n)(500m)
Aug 14th Rapid City, SD (PPx14n)
Aug 29th Forest City, IA (Winnebago x5n)
Sept 3rd Cedar Rapids, IA (171m)
Sept. 17th Peoria, IL (177m)
Sept. 16th Batesville, IL (62m)
Sept. 25th Park City, KY(366m)
Oct 9th Knoxville, TN (224m)
Oct. 10th Lenoir, NC (186m)
Oct. 25th Yemassee, SC(269m)
Nov 1st Port Orange, FL (277m)
Nov. 5th Wildwood, FL (82m)
Nov. 26th Pompano, FL
Dec. 10th Christmas, FL
Dec. 16th Pompano, FL
Dec. 30th Wildwood, FL


8.12.2019-Little Battle of Little Bighorn battlefield

It was just a very short ride to the battlefield of Col Custer and Sitting Bull. This was a battle where Lt. Col George Custer was greatly outnumbered. The grounds here commemorate the valor of those involved in this battle.

8.12.2019-Custer State Park

Our visit to this battlefield, to me, was not a moving as, let’s say, Gettysburg. As always there’s always a gift shop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m not even going to try to sum up this battle, most know of it, at least. A great site to visit to refresh your memory would be

The battle of Little BigHorn

As you know Custer was very much outnumbered, possibly 10:1. Above was our host, a former history teacher, who gave us a awesome recount of all the events that took place and several locations on June 25, 1876. Below is the spot that Custer’s bother, Boston Custer, fell.

The grave marker with black facing is the spot that Custer was found after the battle. Directly in frnt of him would be his other brother Captain T. W. Custer fell during the battle.

A memorial to all who fought and died, at the battle of Little Bighorn. Below was our starting point for this experience and the spot we were enlightened by our host the history teacher, now Ranger. This would be his next to last presentation prior to his retirement from the National Park Rangers.

 

 

 

Tillamook Creamery


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

7.20.2019-Tillimook Creamery in Tillamook, OR

 

 

 

 

 

This is the Tillamook Creamery. It is located in, where else but, Tillamook, OR. Every year this museum/creamery is viewed by over 1.3-million people.

 

 

 

 

 

Everyone touring this complex will go home with a great admiration on the Tillamook attitude towards farming and cattle in particular. For us city folks we’ll learn how intense caring for cattle is on a daily basis. I lost the picture I had of a mechanical scratching wheel designed for the pleasure of the cattle they care for.

 

 

 

 

 

As you walk through this self-guided tour you will be taught the process of making cheese. This learning process is presented in pictures, kiosks and videos.
In our travels what we see, more than anything else, are farms. We both have a great deal of admiration for all those farmers who take so much pride in the areas where their cattle feed and live each day. Sadly so many times we see cattle meandering around in twelve inches of mud. It probably makes no difference in the milk they produce but in all fairness, with all the land most cattle farmers have, they should have more consideration for their animals.

 

 

 

 

 

The Tillamook Factory produces more than 170,000 pounds of cheese each day. It also produces and makes available over one-million pounds of cheese to be sold to the public each week.

Above is the Octopus. Tillamook cheese is aged in forty-pound-cubes for periods of 60 days to, as many as, five-years. Up to fifty-million pounds of cheese is stored and aged at this location on average.

 

Above is the tasting bar. Several flavors and types of Tillamook Cheese are available for consumer consumption in hopes you’ll not go home empty handed. At every venue you’ll almost always find an eatery and a gift shop. This eatery is huge offering items from burgers to ice cream to its guests.

 

 

 

 

 

Our trip here was very exciting and educational. If you’re in the area take time to visit this location.

The Multnomah Falls


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


7.30 2019-We visit Multnomah Falls

 

 

 

 

 

Multnomah is pronounced-Malt-no-ma. Regardless of how you pronounce it over two-million people visit this venue annually. Above, to the right, is the Columbia River. Below is the visitor center, restaurant and gift shop and more importantly restrooms. Also below is a far-away shot of the falls.

 

 

 

 

 

Above is a beautiful shot of the grounds leading up to the falls. Below on the left is the new bridge that spans the falls. The left is the original bridge made of logs; not sure when it was replaced.

 

 

 

 

 

It is very difficult to see, you might have to enlarge the photo, but half way up the hill you can see individuals climbing to the top of the falls. This waterfall is the second tallest in North America at 620 feet. Number one is in the Mount Rainier area and is a two-DAY hike to visit this fall, so very few have seen it.

In the past visitors arrived here by  boat train and even a raft. There’s always a gift shop.

 

Mount Hood Ski Resort


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.

I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


7.23.2019 Field trip to Mount Hood.

The Mount Hood Ski Resort is called Timberline. It’s elevation is at 8000 feet ASL  whereas the mountain itself is at 11,235 feet ASL. It is categorized as a stratovolcano; in other words, it’s not a solid rock or a big pile of dirt. It’s formed through layers of ash and lava.

 

 

 

 

 

This picture of Carla and old Smokey was taken at the Zig Zag Ranger station, right Zig Zag, I don’t know why. As we were traveling to Mount Hood, there it was, in the middle of the road.

 

 

 

 

 

Mount Hood is a potentially “Active” volcano. It has erupted only three times in the last 1800 years and the chances of an substantial eruption in the next thirty years is negligible, but not ruled out. For all purposes it is considered to be potentially dormant. The last eruption took place about 200 years ago.Above is a picture of just a small portion of the parking for this lodge. To the right is a picture of the many ski slopes the mountain offers. Timberline is the only lodge that offers “year-round” skiing in America. The highest and longest ski trail would start at the 8000 foot elevation.

 

 

 

 

 

Indoor pictures of the lodge. Not shown in the pictures are hundreds of really healthy skiers both young and older carrying skies, sleds and snow boards. It’s enough for me to feel even older than I am.

 

 

 

 

 

Timberline is populated with apartment and condos all over the grounds. It’s a playground for the rich. As we were checking out our purchases a group of youngsters were paying cash for their items and they had more hundreds and fifties in their wallets than I could count.

 

 

 

 

 

From this elevation you can see forever almost. We missed the first set of waterfalls but caught the second group. Below are just a couple of shots of how beautiful this area is. Not sure when we’ll be back, but for sure we will return for a longer stay next time.

 

 

Mount Angel Abbey*


Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
-NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.


 

 

7.25.2019-Thursday-Abbey

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We’re off today to experience Mount Angel Abbey. The property it sits on is mostly a butte. As we have discussed in the past; a butte is a hill, both small and tall, made up of dirt, stone and in this area, a combination of volcanic ash and/or magma from thousands of years ago. We begin our tour at the first building on the property, the Press. It is here that the monks legally print documents or reprint books or booklets of interest to the seminary. Below Carla is asking the best way to view all the buildings. to the right is a shot of inside the Press Building.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the pictures above are two dormitory buildings. There is an option to attend, for a while, either on or off campus. If the grounds look awesome, almost as perfect as you would see at Disney, it’s probably through the assistance of the seminary students, the beer they brew and sell, the Coffee House of course and the tuition they charge to attend the seminary. Annual tuition, including room and board, runs a little over $36,000 per year. So, a four-year stay could be as high as $150,000. That’s much cheaper than going to Pharmacy School. At Mass. College of Pharmacy tuition, without room and board, is running over $50,000/year. Below are two more dorm buildings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above left, I believe, is the Chapel, on the left and school building on the right. Our next stop for those building we can enter is the College Museum. If this is all we saw it would have been well worth the one-hour ride here. Below right is a replica of the “Crown of Thorns” that Jesus had to endure. I said replica. The Crucifixion was over 2000 years ago but the bramble bushes having these thorns thrive in the area of Mount Golgotha in Jerusalem, where Our Lord was crucified.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above left, once again, the museum. to the right is the Seminary Chapel. The architecture of the chapel is Romanesque. Below right is the chapel Organ. It’s a Martin Ott Pipe Organ in the choir loft featuring 2478 pipes. Below left is the entrance to the chapel.

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In the foreground just to the left of the alter is another smaller organ. Also noteworthy is the seating configuration in the church. Very similar to what you might find in many of the English Churches and especially Cathedrals. I believe these are Choir Pews. Above right is the seminary library; awesome in size and décor. Above is about all we were permitted to experience. Below right is the walk-way to the Coffee-house, brewery and hundreds of acres of farmlands used to grow hops and almost all the other herbs needed for their beer.

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It would take several pictures to show off the many acres and variety of products grown on this property. Above right is the Coffee-House. They offer many unique beers, produced on the property and a short, simple menu to nimble on while enjoying your brew. Below is the inside of the Coffee-House and an Historic picture of the devastating fire that destroyed every building on the campus. It took over eighteen-months before classes would be held on the school grounds. I think this took place in 1926 or there about.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below left is a peek of the distillery. The staff here were so awesome. Very informative and once lived in the vicinity from where we came from.

 

 

 

 

 

The ride home, in Oregon, is always a pleasant experience.

 

Oregon Observatory*



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, 
you need. 
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)
Time to travel East

*****************************************

The following text is from the Oregon Observatory Website.

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This small building was not what I was expecting. I thought we’d have to drive up to the top of a mountain then look into a many ton telescope, but no, not here. It’s personal. Workers and volunteers abound everywhere. Below, a view of the sun in mid-day, is exactly what you see in the “white telescope” you see a couple of pictures down.

The Oregon Observatory. Billions and billions of sights to see. When our roofs disappear we have the largest collection of telescopes for public viewing in the United States. Feast your eyes on faraway galaxies.

Brian, seen below talking to Carla, and an older gentleman Bill were so helpful in tutoring us on the use of their telescopes.

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Witness a meteor shower. Get a glimpse of globular clusters, nebulae and deep space binary stars, as well as our closest star, the Sun. There’s no better place than the Oregon Observatory at Sunriver.

The white telescope below is not outrageously expensive; around a couple of thousand dollars and the computer that locates the individual stars will cost you about six-hundred dollars.

All these telescopes plus another dozen in the back of the building are is use on Wednesday and Saturday evening for as many as two-hundred to as many as four-hundred guests to use. We visited during the day and returned in the evening to experience the telescopes. The roof on the building actually slide to the back exposing all these scopes to the open skies. If it wasn’t for the extreme cooler temperatures, around 55, it would have been a perfect day.

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Sunriver’s elevation, pitch-dark surroundings, and crystal clear air make it perfect for stargazing. At the Oregon Observatory, you won’t be lining up just for one quick peek. We have many of our telescopes set up for your enjoyment, from Tele Vue refractors to our 30-inch Newtonian. So if you really want to see the sights of Bend and Central Oregon, then we want to see you at the Oregon Observatory. Astronomy and rocketry conveniently located in Oregon’s most popular destination resort, adjacent to the Sunriver Nature Center.

Above is the dead trunk of a “dead tree,” but it’s only dead if it does not contribute to the environment. The, so-called dead tree trunk is called a “snag.” Wood-peckers and a variety of other birds will adopt this tree for their sustenance. They will knock themselves out pecking away on the wood and even find foods in the form of bugs and insects to eat.  In other words it’s either this tree trunk or the wood siding of your home.

All of this made possible by our supporters and friends. All telescopes, equipment and buildings made possible by generous donations. (The italics texts is courtesy of the Oregon Observatory Web Site.)

The amphitheater above is used to instruct audiences of all ages on the many constellations of our universe.

6.05.19-Oregon Observatory
This day began cool and got slightly cooler. A few days ago we dropped by the observatory and were greatly impressed. We will go back to the Observatory this evening, and it will be cold. The temp will not go above 55 degrees.

 

Mount Newberry Experience*



Please take the time to leave a comment
at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING,
 you need,
 NOT the need to have EVERYTHING!

6.10.19-Mount Newberry Experience
Mount Newberry is about thirty-miles down the road. I thought it would be a one-topic venue but discovered that we enjoyed the Paulina Lakes, the East Lake, Paulina Falls and finally Obsidian Peak.

Paulina Lake

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Once again we see the specter of this mountain range. This time were at a roadside viewing point. For the first time we also have the names of these mountains. The Sister Mountains, back in the 1800’s were once know as Faith, Hope and Charity. Bachelor, extreme left, appears to tower over the others, but in actuality it’s only just over nine-thousand feet. Two of the Sister mountains are over eleven thousand feet. The area on the topographical rendering is about the size of Rhode Island. This entire area was covered with lava rock from twelve to five-hundred feet deep.

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In the center of the picture above is the result of its blowing its top. Center of picture is Mount Newberry. When the incident happened it spread lava all over up to thirty miles away. Where Carla’s finger is, at the top of the picture is Sunriver, the town we are camping in. Once again, Center picture are those two blue areas. Right now we’re visiting the pool of water on the left, Paulina Lake. Below are pictures of this area.

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Above is a blow-up of the top of Mount Newberry. It took thousands of years but after the initial blow-up the insides of the volcano actually fell into itself. This formed a “Caldera.” This is very similar to what happened to the Volcano involved with Crater Lake. In the case of Newberry we got two lakes, one a little higher than the other.

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The mountains above have no relation to what were to see today. Mount Newberry is our challenge for today. It was back about 30,000 years ago that Newberry began to grow. And grow it did, reaching over 12,000 feet at one time. Then around 10,000 years ago, as one youngster put it, it blew its top.

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Above is Obsidian Peak. You cannot drive to the top but there is a trail you can hike to it. Below is the Paulina Lake Lodge, closed at this time.

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Below another picture of the Lodge and above you find a Telephone Booth. When did you ever see one of these.

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Now we’re off to experience East Lake, the blue body of water in the picture at the top of the blog.

East Lake:

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Now were off to Obsidian Rock:

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. This is a special type of lava flow. Below the path isn’t great but I have a feeling it won’t last.

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 This is a section of the flow. The depth here is about 200 feet. (Below) This is what I was afraid of. Not only is it very rough and laden with outcroppings of rocks, it’s going up, I mean very high up.

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Need I say we’re still going up and I see no smooth super highway ahead. Below is a BIG example of Obsidian Rock. This type of rock, if you look closely is almost “glass-like.” In fact it is glass. Commercial glass is 99.7% pure silica (sand). The rock in the picture below is 77% silica but still qualifies it as being glass.

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I’m tired and ready to leave but we have one more stop. Above we saw a picture of Obsidian Rock. Below is a picture of the mountain we were walking around and it is a solid piece of Obsidian Rock about thirty-thousand years old.

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Paulina Falls:.

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We decided to put off viewing the lower point of the Paulina Falls until just before we leave. Here goe the National Park Service enticing us with this wide flat walk-way, I wonder what really lies ahead.

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The walkway did not disappoint, it actually got better and above is what we saw all the way up to the falls. Yes I said UP! Below  are the falls and it was well worth the uphill climb.
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Remember what a Caldera is? This is when a volcano goes dormant and in ten or twenty thousand years the sides of the top of the volcano slowly begin to fall into  itself forming a “bowl” or in the official language a “Caldera.” Remember this is the volcano that spilled lava over an area of Oregon the size of Rhode Island.

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Some of the beautiful natural views in this National Park.

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Now we’re working are way down from the falls to view them from below, like they’ll look that much more different.

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Above we’re looking DOWN the rough rocky barely visible trail and stopped to decide will it really be worth traversing this path. Below we decide not to pursue the journey and take everybody’s word on the fact that it’s a beautiful site. We’re older, NOT OLD, and we know it. No need to take chances, we do enough of that on a regular basis.

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Ah! the parking lot. I could go for a beer. A very nice day for sure.

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Crater Lake

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

 


TRAVEL ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th Pacific City, OR @ Cloverdale RVP (T3 x14n)
July 16th Portland, OR @ Columbia River RVP (PPx2n)
July 18th Welch’s, OR @ Mt Hood (T3 x12n)
Time to travel East

*****************************************

5.23.19-Visiting the Crater Lake venue was awesome. Our tip can be set up into three divisions. This is almost June!

Tripping to the Lake

Experiencing the lake

and the Fossilized Steam venue.

Just one of the many mountain views we experienced on our trip to Crater Lake.

A Cherished History

Crater Lake National Park is a place where you can experience diverse wilderness in a setting of breathtaking beauty. More than 7,000 years ago, a fierce eruption shook the 12,000-foot-tall Mount Mazama, triggering the mountain’s collapse. The area’s Klamath tribes witnessed the volcano’s eruption, and their histories include many stories about how Crater Lake and its features were created. 

This is a picture of Mount Thielsen.

 

 

 

In the hundreds of years after the eruption, rainfall and snowfall filled the crater and formed the lake. No streams run into or out of the lake – its levels depend entirely on precipitation, evaporation, and seepage. At nearly 2,000 feet, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States. That depth, combined with the water’s purity, gives the lake its remarkable deep blue color.

 

This is now what the top of Mount Mazama looks like today.

Above is the Welcoming Sign to Crater Lake National Park. Below is an Information Kiosk and, more importantly, behind it an outhouse.

As you can see snow is beginning to show itself on both sides of the road.

The entrance to Crater Lake National Park.

Above and below is the Administration Building. I wonder if they ever call a no-work day because the snow has buried the entrance?

The Visitor Information Center and, of course, Gift Shop. In this building we bought a couple of items and waited patiently for twenty-five minutes for the next showing of a movie on CL.

This is what the top of Mount Mazama looks like today. Before Mount Mazama blew its top it was over 12,000 feet ASL

On May 22, 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt signed the legislation that created the sixth national park in the United States, Crater Lake National Park. When you visit today, you can explore the fascinating volcanic features that date back to the lake’s formation.

This text was taken from the Crater Lake Website,

courtesy of the National Park Service.

In the early 1930’s the Crater Lake region received over seventy feet of snow. On average it usually gets around forty-four feet of snow.

Yup, I dared myself to stand upon a short stone wall to take this picture. To my right and left are signs stating “Stay-back.” On the lake side of the stone wall is snow, very slippery snow on a steep hill going into the lake. If you survived you might be in trouble with the law since no one is permitted to take a swim in this lake. Like would anyone be thinking of that as they were sliding down into the lake.

Yes! Here’s that wall that no one is supposed to breach.

 

In the center is Wizard Island. Elevation of the volcano, yes volcano. is 6940 feet ASL. This is a volcano within a volcano. As you have read the entirety of Crater Lake sits in a volcano. Below is a nothing picture of a car with Massachusetts plates carrying two bikes and a snow shovel, just in case.

 

Above behind the sign saying “road closed” are some very tiny people in relation to the height of the snow bank. Now, we’ve left the proximity of the Lake and traveled a short distance to the Rim Village Café and Gift Shop. For a change we had a bite to eat this time. Carla enjoyed a bowl of Minestrone soup and I a hot dog. Hindsight being I should have gone with the soup. Below are some of the picture from this two-story building.

Two ways to look at this! Either Carla is really short or that there’s a heck of a lot of snow behind her. Below we met an awesome couple Berry and Roberta Mullin. Not full-timers but they do travel in a Vistabule Teardrop Trailer. Below their picture is a picture of the Vestibule Trailer they have.

 

 

We’re both a little tired and it’s about 3pm, Scoots will be looking for her 5pm feeding shortly. We were not that far away from the lake when we happened across the Fossilized Steam Venue.

 

 

Who needs a telephoto lens when you can crop! Center of picture is a thousands year old fossilized steam structure. 

 

 

Family History Library

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.
HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING, you need.
NOT the need to have EVERYTHING.

 

 

May / June ITENERARY
May 2nd Green River, UT at KOA Campground x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 lay-overs) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

5.09.19-Family History Library

.

.To find ourselves in this building was the main purpose for the trip.


.

Basically we came here to uncover some additional information on my father Leo Grenier as related to his military service. Below is a picture of him in his younger days. Sadly, isn’t it, that we finally get the urge to learn more at such a late date. Handsome dude, not sure what happened to me. It did not take long to get hooked.

He looks so much like my brothers Richard and Dennis. Guess I took after my mother’s side of the family. This is the only really good younger image of my father I have. Lots of family pictures, but he was almost always on the wrong side of the lens.
.

.Above this beautiful artwork of Jesus preaching to the multitudes. All the people, both young and old, were so thoughtful, polite and helpful. As part of their religious obligations they are asked to volunteer eighteen months to the cause of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church. None of them, young or old, hesitate to graciously speak about their religion and its teachings. It’s very nice and comforting to see so many so strongly routed in their religion. I could never be converted, but if I were not committed to Catholicism this might get some attention from me. Below Sister I Forgot Name, begins to help us dig into my father’s past, and teach us how to work their program.


.

.We’re on the forth floor. Each floor is designated for different areas of data search. The floors below us and one above all look like this.


.Sister will leave us after about 45 minutes and a twenty something stepped in to help. He worked feverishly trying to collect the data we were looking for on my father, and finally put it all together. Data entry should be an exacting field, but don’t kid yourself. I’d always seen my father refer to himself as Leo Grenier, when in actuality we discovered that the Canadians have a tendency, at least in the past, to give the name Joseph to all the boys and Mary to the girls. So his official name, as far as data searching goes turned out to be “J Leo Oscar Grenier.” Who would have known!

Above, not seen to clearly, are older men in many locations on the floor, unabashedly talking and explaining the Adventist Religion. I could never be converted but I only wish I had the same grasp on my Catholic faith as I see in these individuals. Maybe I’m just not hanging out in the right places.

Experience Petroglyphs ???

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING.

March/April ITENERARY

May 2nd Green River, UT at Shady Acres x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 layovers) x7n (234m)
May 16th Bend, OR TT (layovers TBD) x7n (654m)
June 5th Newport, OR at Whaler’s Rest
June 26th leave Newport, OR
*****************************************

May 4th- Experience Petroglyphs ???

Hope I peeked your interest. pet·ro·glyph, NOUN  are rock carvings, especially prehistoric ones. For more information on this read the May 4th Blog on it.

23 April, 2014 – 23:26 aprilholloway

The haunting rock art of Sego Canyon – extra-terrestrials or spiritual visions? 

The sandstone cliffs of Sego Canyon are a spectacular outdoor art gallery of petroglyphs painted and carved by Native Americans peoples over a period of around 8,000 years.  They are characterised by more than 80 imposing and haunting life-sized figures with hollowed eyes or missing eyes and the frequent absence of arms and legs. Some claim that the mysterious figures are evidence of alien visitation in our ancient past, while scholars maintain that the strange beings represent shamanistic visions produced in trance-like states.

Above are four Mesas. In about a half hour or so we will be driving down a road in-between mesas two and three. Below is that road. It feels and looks like no one has been here in years.

Evidence of human habitation in Sego Canyon dates back to the Archaic Period (6,000 – 100 BC).  But subsequent Anasazi, Fremont, and Ute tribes also left their mark upon the area, painting and chipping their religious visions, clan symbols, and records of events into the cliff walls.

 Below is the only wild-life, a young calf, we’ve come across in the last two weeks.

The rock art of Sego Canyon can be characterised according to a number of distinctive styles, and time periods.  The oldest art belongs to the Archaic period and dates to between 6,000 BC and 2,000 BC.  Some of the most spectacular examples of rock art in the Southwest are attributed to Archaic people. They were nomads, who hunted large and small game animals, and collected and processed wild plants. They did not build permanent habitation structures, but lived in caves and in small brush shelters built in the open.

Above the road does not get any better. Below is the reason for our being here.

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Within the Archaic period and beginning around 4,000 years ago, we see the Barrier Canyon Style rock art, a distinctive style of art which appears mostly in Utah, with the largest concentration of sites in and around the San Rafael Swell and Canyonlands National Park, but the full range extends into much of the state and western Colorado. Barrier Canyon Style rock art panels are mostly pictographs (painted) but there are also several petroglyphs (pecked) in the style.

Above is our looking back. We appear to be going downhill. For this reason, I’ve deduced, the Fremont peoples lived with a source of water. Back a couple of thousand years ago this area might have been totally flooded and this could have been a fairly deep lake, a good source of fish. Once we get closer to our objective our path becomes very primitive.

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Fremont petroglyphs in Sego Canyon. Photo source .

Beginning 1300 AD and lasting until 1880 AD, the Ute people inhabited the region of Sego Canyon and carved their own style on the cliff faces. Prior to the arrival of Mexican settlers, the Utes occupied significant portions of what are today eastern Utah, western Colorado, and parts of New Mexico and Wyoming.

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The Utes were never a unified group within historic times; instead, they consisted of numerous nomadic bands that maintained close associations with other neighbouring groups. The historic Ute rock art is identified and dated by the horse and rider figures.

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Above and below are the reasons for our visiting this venue.

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Horses were introduced to North America by the Spanish in the sixteenth century. Other figures, or elements, painted in red and white on the panel include a white bison, a human figure with leggings, several large human figures, and large circles believed to be shields. The Ute people lived freely throughout western Colorado and eastern Utah until about 1880, when they were forced onto reservations.

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Extra-terrestrials or spiritual visions?

Advocates of the ancient astronaut theory suggest that the strange figures of the Barrier Canyon style rock art depict extra-terrestrials that once visited Earth. They point to the large, hollow looking eyes and the triangular shaped heads as evidence that the figures were not human.  However, others, like researcher Polly Schaafsma (1999) say that they represent shamanistic art associated with ritual activities of the Archaic people. Ms Schaafsma points to the fact that the ‘spirit figures’ are frequently shown holding snake forms, and their torsos sometimes incorporate water/life-giving symbols. The presence of these types of relational (figure/animal) motifs is considered to be evidence that there was a shamanistic tradition alive, at least during a certain period of time, among these Western Archaic people.  So what accounts for the unusual features, such as strange eyes, legless bodies, and what appears to be wings?

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A close-up thanks for cropping.

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According to Ms Schaafsma, shamanic practitioners, with the assistance of various spirits, were said to have the ability to travel to celestial realms and the underworld, in order to communicate with ‘purveyors of power’.  Hallucinations and visionary experiences characterise the shamanic trance experience, often provoked by the use of hallucinogens.

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Ute rock art, 1300 AD. Photo source

“With the aid of spirit helpers, tutelary deities, and divine or semi-divine beings, these otherworldly voyagers contact ancestral and supernatural powers in the interests of curing, fertility, divining, successful hunting, battle exploits, and weather control,” she wrote in a paper on the symbology of the Barrier Canyon rock art.

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Universally, shamans have communicated their extraordinary experiences through art. Are the Sego Canyon pictographs and petroglyphs another example of this?  No one really knows for sure what the images represent or why they were painted. The god-like, imposing and fantastical figures etched onto the cliffs of Sego Canyon remain an enigma and the true meaning behind them may never be unlocked.

Featured image: Petroglyphs in Sego Canyon. Photo source .

By April Holloway

References

Sego Canyon Petroglyphs – Science Views

Trance and Transformation in the Canyons – by Polly Schaafsma

The Barrier Canyon Rock Art Style – by David Sucec

Traces of a Lost People – Smithsonian

Barrier Canyon Style Rock Art – by James Q. Jacobs

 

 

<font color=”#00008″>Dark Blue</font>

>Columns seen at the bottom of the picture are Hoodoos.BLUE

<font color=”#00008″>Dark Blue</font>

Antelope Canyon (pictorial)

 

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.25.2019 ANTELOPE CANYON TOUR

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Courtesy of WikiLeaks

Upper Antelope Canyon is called Tsé bighánílíní, ‘the place where water runs through rocks’ by the Navajo. It is the most frequently visited by tourists for two reasons. First, its entrance and entire length are at ground level, requiring no climbing.

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Second, beams or shafts of direct sunlight radiating down from openings at the top of the canyon are much more common in Upper than in Lower.

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Beams occur most often in the summer months, as they require the sun to be high in the sky. Winter colors are more muted. Summer months provide two types of lighting.

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Light beams start to peek into the canyon March 20 and disappear October 7 each year.

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Antelope Canyon is visited exclusively through guided tours, in part because rains during monsoon season can quickly flood the canyon. Rain does not have to fall on or near the Antelope Canyon slots for flash floods to whip through, as rain falling dozens of miles away upstream of the canyons can funnel into them with little prior notice.

 

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On August 12, 1997, eleven tourists, including seven from France, one from the United Kingdom, one from Sweden and two from the United States, were killed in Lower Antelope Canyon by a flash flood. Very little rain fell at the site that day, but an earlier thunderstorm had dumped a large amount of water into the canyon basin, 7 miles (11 km) upstream.

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The lone survivor of the flood was tour guide Francisco “Pancho” Quintana, who had prior swift-water training. At the time, the ladder system consisted of amateur-built wood ladders that were swept away by the flash flood. Today, ladder systems have been bolted in place, and deployable cargo nets are installed at the top of the canyon. At the fee booth, a NOAA Weather Radio from the National Weather Service and an alarm horn are stationed.

Despite improved warning and safety systems, the risks of injuries from flash floods still exist. On July 30, 2010, several tourists were stranded on a ledge when two flash floods occurred at Upper Antelope Canyon. Some of them were rescued and some had to wait for the flood waters to recede. There were reports that a woman and her nine-year-old son were injured as they were washed away downstream, but no fatalities were reported.

 

  

Bryce Canyon

 Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

TRAVEL ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.19.2019 Bryce Canyon Park part of Zion.

This article is Courtesy of the National Park Service
Bryce Canyon National Park lies on the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south central Utah.

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Bryce Canyon National Monument (administered by the U.S. Forest Service) was originally established on June 8, 1923 to preserve the “unusual scenic beauty, scientific interest, and importance.”

The Visitor’s Center

On June 7, 1924, the monument’s name was changed to Utah National Park and it was transferred to the National Park Service. On February 25, 1928 Utah National Park was changed to Bryce Canyon National Park. Subsequent legislation enlarged the park to its current size of 35,835 acres.

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The route we will follow up to, but not including MM11. Site 11 is still impacted with snow.


Bryce is famous for its unique geology, consisting of a series of horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters carved from the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah.

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The erosional force of frost-wedging and the dissolving power of rainwater have shaped the colorful calcium-rich mudstone of the Claron Formation into bizarre shapes including slot canyons, windows, fins, and spires called “hoodoos.”

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Columns seen at the bottom of the picture are Hoodoos.


Tinted with colors too numerous and subtle to name, these whimsically arranged rocks create a wondrous landscape of mazes, offering some of the most exciting and memorable walks and hikes imaginable.

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As much as I like to pretend that Carla and I are climbing cliffs and leaning over them as well, it’s not true. What you see above is the type of climbing and walking we do most of the time. The National Park Service walkways are not generally this nice or this big, but they are paved


Ponderosa pines, high elevation meadows, and fir-spruce forests border the rim of the plateau and abound with wildlife. This area boasts some of the world’s best air quality, offering panoramic views of three states and approaching 200 miles of visibility. This, coupled with the lack of nearby large light sources, creates unparalleled opportunities  for stargazing.


This Canyon is named after this couple, they discovered it and brought it to the attention of the public. Ebenezer and Mary Bryce.>….


One of the first questions people ask when visiting the rugged wilds of southern Utah is, “Who would live here?” The answer is, “Many different cultures over thousands of years have foraged, hunted and survived in this wilderness.”

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This self guided tour we’re on for ten miles is divided into
individual sites and views. Without going into more detail than
necessary I’m attempting to entice you with a small smattering of images along this trip


Historic Resource Study
Introduction: Small by National Park standards, the 56.2 square miles of Bryce Canyon National Park occupy the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south-central Utah. The park is not a canyon. Rather, it is a spectacular series of more than a dozen amphitheaters, each of which is carved at least 1,000 feet into the chromatic limestone of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. …


Just a few more pictures to end this blog. Red Canyon and Bryce Canyon are as exciting, if not more exciting, than the Grand Canyon.


x


Tripping to one of the last viewing locations. Needless to say were going uphill and our elevation, right now, is over 8000 feet./font>


x


To the NPS’s Credit, this is what the viewing trails used to look like before they retrofit them with concrete


x x x


The final leg of our tour is around nine-thousand foot level and yes, snow abounds everywhere.



“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

orange-red

blue….

 

Red Canyon-Dixie Nat’l Forrest

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog.  I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

TRAVEL ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.19.2019-Red Canyon, Dixie Forrest, Utah

We’ve been on the road about thirty minutes and are now approaching Red Canyon, which is part of the Dixie National Forrest and Zion National Park.


This area has had inhabitants for thousands of years. As in all areas like this water is at a premium if found at all. For them each day was a challenge for survival.

In the above picture the tall sentinel formations are called Hoodoos. Eventually Mother Nature will wear away the sand-stone rock substance at the bottom and in-between the two hoodoos.


This is not a Natural Bridge, definitely man-made. Same for the tunnel you will see in a couple of images.


Man-made, but it sure looks cool! Hard to believe the rock formation below.

Kanab, UT

 

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.19.19-GOOD FRIDAY-EXPERIENCE KANAB CANYONS

Good Friday is a day of fast and abstinence. The last few days we’ve done so much “hanging around” spending another day doing nothing wasn’t that appealing. It is a special day and TV is usually at a minimum or nothing until at least 3pm. We decided to experience His majesty wonders by viewing the canyons in Kanab, UT.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kanab (/kəˈnæb/kə-NAB) is a city in and the county seat of Kane County, Utah, United States.[4] It is located on Kanab Creek just north of the Arizona state line.

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The road-side views on our way to Red Canyon were awesome.

 

This area was first settled in 1864 and the town was founded in 1870 when ten Latter-Day Saint families moved into the area.[5] The population was 4,312 at the 2010 census.

Red Canyon Area:

We even had the opportunity to drive through two sand-rock tunnels to find ourselves here. The name “Red Canyon” comes from the heave concentration of iron minerals in the sand-rock itself.

Kanab is situated in the “Grand Circle” area, centrally located among Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, Bryce Canyon National Park, the Grand Canyon (North Rim), Zion National Park, and Lake Powell.

Bryce Canyon Area:

The Bryce Canyon tour encompassed several stops in different locations. Each location offered a unique canyon character from the previous location, please read the blogs on these.

Other nearby attractions include Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park, the privately owned Moqui Cave, and the largest animal sanctuary in the United States, Best Friends Animal Society.

Some additional pictures of Bryce Canyon:

 

Locals refer to Kanab as “Little Hollywood” due to its history as a filming location for many movies and television series, prominently western, such as Stagecoach (1939), The Lone Ranger, Death Valley Days. Gunsmoke, Daniel Boone, El Dorado (1966), Planet of the Apes (1968), Mackenna’s Gold, Sergeants 3, WindRunner: A Spirited Journey, Western Union (1941), The Desperadoes (1943), In Old Oklahoma (1943), Buffalo Bill (1944), Westward the Women (1952), Tomahawk Trail (1957), Fort Bowie (1958), Sergeants Three (1962), Duel at Diablo (1966), Ride in the Whirlwind (1965), The Shooting (1966), and The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976).[6][7]

 

Courtesy of Wikipedia

 

Bryce Canyon National Park lies on the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south central Utah. Bryce Canyon National Monument (administered by the U.S. Forest Service) was originally established on June 8, 1923 to preserve the “unusual scenic beauty, scientific interest, and importance.” On June 7, 1924, the monument’s name was changed to Utah National Park and it was transferred to the National Park Service. On February 25, 1928 Utah National Park was changed to Bryce Canyon National Park. Subsequent legislation enlarged the park to its current size of 35,835 acres.

Bryce is famous for its unique geology, consisting of a series of horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters carved from the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah. The erosional force of frost-wedging and the dissolving power of rainwater have shaped the colorful calcium-rich mudstone of the Claron Formation into bizarre shapes including slot canyons, windows, fins, and spires called “hoodoos.” Tinted with colors too numerous and subtle to name, these whimsically arranged rocks create a wondrous landscape of mazes, offering some of the most exciting and memorable walks and hikes imaginable.

Ponderosa pines, high elevation meadows, and fir-spruce forests border the rim of the plateau and abound with wildlife. This area boasts some of the world’s best air quality, offering panoramic views of three states and approaching 200 miles of visibility. This, coupled with the lack of nearby large light sources, creates unparalleled opportunities for stargazing.

 


“Everything we were, we carry with us. Everything we will be, is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet.” pjgrenier


 

Kolob Canyon Trail

View Journals – select “Journals” from above for the drop-down menu.

Please take the time to leave a comment at the bottom of this blog. I relish the positive ones and will learn from the negative ones.

 

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.11.2019

Kolob

Late Summer Storm in Kolob Canyons

This text is courtesy of the National Park Service


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Awesome scenery don’t you think?

 


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Welcome to Kolob Canyons
The Kolob Canyons section of Zion National Park is located at Exit 40 on Interstate 15, 40 miles north of Zion Canyon and 17 miles south of Cedar City.

 


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 A five-mile scenic drive along the Kolob Canyons Road allows visitors to view the crimson canyons and gain access to various trails and scenic viewpoints.

 

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Even this kind of path isn’t that bad, if only it were not always going uphill.

 

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Here in the northwest corner of the park, narrow parallel box canyons are cut into the western edge of the Colorado Plateau, forming majestic peaks and 2,000 foot cliff walls.

 

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The sign says one-half mile but it honestly felt like two miles. Below,
Yea, we have walking sticks also, in the car.

 

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Whether you come to view the panoramic landscape from our scenic drive, hike into one of our majestic canyons, or begin a multi-day adventure into the Zion Wilderness, Kolob Canyons has something special for everyone to experience.

 

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I’m coming!!!

The NPS evidently found its nice walkways being drowned out by heavy downpours. To try to eliminate the problem they set up the path in square block allowing a space in between each square block for water to pass through… ingenious!

 

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Kolob Canyons Visitor Center
All guests are required to stop at the Kolob Canyons Visitor Center to show an Interagency Park Pass or pay the Zion National Park entrance fee.

 

 

If Carla looks a little tired right now, you’re right, I think we both are.

Wilderness permits can be obtained here for backpacking campsites
and canyoneering routes in the park.

 

 

 

There is also a bookstore operated by the Zion Natl Park Forever Project.

Did you notice we’re still going uphill!

 

 

 

The views are so awesome it takes you attention off the job at hand,
walking without tripping. This is the reason we opted not to walk the Bright-Angel  path to the bottom of the grand canyon. I can think of one or two other reasons as well.

 

 

 

These are the paths I don’t get excited about. A couple of years ago I would not have thought twice about this type of challenge, but not any more. Now I live with a fear of tripping over something or even my own two feet.

 

 

 

Did I mention we’re both getting a little tired of going uphill!!

 

 

Yup, still going uphill. On the bright side,
we’ve been told we’re almost there.

 

 

Carla finally reaches the top, I follow right after her.
There is another peak and observation point
but we’re just going to take their word on the views from there.

 

 

 

As you can see we’ve begun our final leg of this venture, the walk back.
It’s been an awesome experience, but we’re both anxiously looking fort our car.

 

 

The trip down is steep and carries it’s own trepidations, once again, tripping and falling.

 

 

 

Remember these guys? I won’t say any more. In a few minutes the car comes into view.
Ah! The ride home, heavenly!

 

 

 

You’ll have to blow it up on your computer to read the captions in the picture, but in short, it says that everything up on these hills might and someday will fall down to the ground. The left side of the picture is about a 900 ton rock that came down and fell on a truck. Nether the truck nor the driver did well that day.

 

 

Up and down this five-mile stretch of road you’ll find
road crews creating observation points and laying down
new pavement for generations to come to enjoy this venue.

 

 

 

Home is only a thirty minute ride but we enjoyed every mile of it.

 

 

“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

 

Zion National Park

To view Journals select “Journals” from the drop-down menu, and select the month and year.

 

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************

4.08.2019- Monday- Zion National Park

 

Trip to Zion

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This is Quail Lake.  As you can see from the wall that confines it, it’s man-made. For an area that does not boast of many lakes, natural or man-made, this one is huge.

 

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Just a few scenic views of the area and the road to Zion. Our first stop will be Zion Lodge.

 

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We are approaching Zion National Park.

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Zion Lodge and check in center. It takes us about thirty minutes to get here from St. George. We’ll check in with this ranger, who vacations in Orlando, FL, using Carla’s park pass, and make our way to the Visitor’s center.

 

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National Park Service is working diligently to create a venue very similar to what we saw in the Grand Canyon. It’s work in progress but so much has already been accomplished, especially the roads, walking areas and parking venues.

 

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Work construction going on in preparation for the Summer crowds. The roadways are very well marked as well as walkways and trail ways.  We’re in a double-car shuttle here taking us to our first stop.

 

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Just a very small number of views we experienced on our trip to our first stop.

 

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The grotto will be our first walking tour. Yes, we did a lot walking today.

 

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The Grotto.

It’s just a place, no lake and no waterfalls. But it’s not next door. No Uber either, foot power only.

 

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So many vistas. I had over three-hundred pictures but could only use fifty of so.

 

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Every one of these venues are accessible but it’s always an uphill climb to get there. The path began as being very generous, that will change in a few minutes.

 

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Above is what the path will turn into. A gravel walkway with stone, roots and narrows to contend with.

 

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I mean to find out the significance of this tree. The bark on this tree has been twisted either by wind or water.

 

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Move unbelievable vistas. This is all part of the Grotto.

 

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A Ranger homestead. There are several in the area. Below is  shuttle bus, just missed it. They come around every 15-20 minutes.

 

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From here we’ll look for trail signs for our next venue; Weeping Rock. n the meantime enjoy some of the many mountain views around here until we can figure out where we go next, it’s around here somewhere.

 

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Okay, we found the trail. As always it goes uphill first.

 

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Weeping Rock Trailhead

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In the distance you can see our destination, Weeping Rock. It’s about and quarter-mile away and, as always, it will be an uphill climb.

 

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The National Park Service does such. Great job of making g these venues accessible. No much anyone can do about the uphill climbs. The paths are passable but not always paved. Everyone must pay attention to where they place their feet and a walking stick is always helpful. Above you can see primitive steps and below a state of the art people bridge, to move the millions of visitors along.

 

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The trail, in sections, is very passable and as you can see below we do get to our destination.

 

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Looking away from the falls you can appreciate the effort the NPS has gone through to allow large groups of people enjoy these beautiful destinations. Below, however, it’s time for us to turn our attention to going back and catching another shuttle to take us to our car.

 

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The best part of leaving a particular venue, in most cases, is that it is usually a downhill walk. Be mindful, however, walking a steep grade downhill produces its own set of precautions.

 

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Finally we get to that beautiful bridge again and those primitive steps.

 

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We take one last look at Weeping Rock and say good-bye. It’s time to try to find the trail to the Temple of  Sinawava.

 

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Temple of Sinawava / River Walk


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The above two climbers are climbing the rock mountain shown below. If you  look closely you might see two very small speck at the dead center of the picture; that’s them.

 

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Every hike begins with our trying to find the trail to hike. It’s not generally that difficult but just wanted he text to fit the picture. Below is Sinawava. t looks close but it’s about a very slow quarter-mile hike.

 

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Yup, we found our path. Carla takes the first steps. Below is Sinawava also.

 

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This begins with the Riverdale. We’ll be walking along the Virgin River.

 

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We cross the Virgin River and yes, Carla is looking a little tired. A great deal of walking today, and we’re feeling it. In the next few pictures are scenes of the mountains we be seeing on our walk.

 

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The Lower Emerald Pool

 

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“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

 

We visit the Fashion Mall

 

To view the Journals select “Journals” for the drop-down menu.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

March/April ITENERARY

March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest

*****************************************

4.02.2019-
Yes, there is a Microsoft store in the Fashion Mall. This place was huge. Possibly a little Exterior view of Fashion Show smaller than the city of Titusville, FL. Hundreds of shops and kiosks. We needed to find a schematic on where everything is located. And there is was, an information kiosk. This venue was about eight feet tall and two feet wide and totally interactive. We’d never experienced anything so easy to operate. goto-Fashion Show Mall OH! We did find the Microsoft store and the young  staff girl was able to resuscitate the surface back to life again.

The longer we stay here the more this town is growing on us. Another venue popped up on our way a Cathedral.

This was so awesome, except in a vein attempt to find our way to its location we failed. We will have to put this venue off to the next time we visit Vegas.

 


“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Atomic Testing Museum

To view the Journals select “Journals” for the drop-down menu.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

March/April ITENERARY March 3rd Phoenix, AZ overnight (. ) March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x14n March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground for 4 nights March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m) April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m) April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m) *****************************************

Thousand Trails/Thousand Tales-pjgrernier

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This would be a reproduction of what a bunker would have looked like back in the early Nevada atomic bomb experiments

The bomb experiments would eventually be carried out below ground. I’ve read that a large amount  of the fall out from the above ground explosions actually went North to Utah, our next big venue.

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All the display rooms in this museum are fairly small. Not sure if that was on purpose or not. Almost gives a person the feeling of being underground.

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Displays and miniaturization abound everywhere. There’s a great deal of information to digest here. All this reminds me, very much, of the infomercials Dennis and I would have to sit through when we went off to the movies on those Saturday mornings.

Below: This piece of equipment went underground to measure the force of the explosions. Much to much detail for this blog.

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We actually spent a couple of hours at this museum. On our way home we noticed the Eye, located on the strip. I think we and the museum were east of the strip.

Hotels and Casinos, guess were getting closer to the Las Vegas strip.

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Text to follow from Wikipedia:

The museum opened in March 2005 as the “Atomic Testing Museum”, operated by the Nevada Test Site Historical Foundation as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. It is located in Las Vegas, Nevada, at 755 E. Flamingo Rd., just north of McCarran International Airport and just east of the Las Vegas Strip. Funding included support from the purchase of commemorative Nevada Test Site license plates issued by the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles.

On December 31, 2011, President Barack Obama signed a military spending bill which included designating the museum as a national museum affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution. The National Atomic Testing Museum is one of 37 national museums in the U.S.

B53 nuclear bomb on display

The museum covers the period from the first test at NTS on January 27, 1951, to the present. Among its exhibits covering American nuclear history is a “Ground Zero Theater” which simulates the experience of observing an atmospheric nuclear test.

Other exhibits include Geiger counters, radio badges and radiation testing devices, Native American artifacts from around the test area, pop culture memorabilia related to the atomic age, equipment used in testing the devices. Other displays focus on important figures at the facility, videos and interactive exhibits about radiation.[3]

In 2012 the museum added an exhibit about Area 51, and expanded the exhibit two years later.[4]

Weather monitoring[edit]

Weather station outside the National Atomic Testing Museum

The weather station outside of the National Atomic Testing Museum records weather data for downtown Las Vegas. The data include temperature, wind speed and background gamma radiation in microroentgens per hour. The station is part of the Community Environmental Monitoring Network (CEMP).

“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Grand Canyon Trip

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

This month’s Travel Plans:
March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights
April 5th St. George, Utah (119m) x13 nights (119m)
April 19th Kanab, UT at Crazy Horse RVP (80m)x7 nights (80m)
April 26th Salina, UT at RPI RVP(163m) x7 nights (163m)
May 2nd Moab, UT at KOA Campground (159m)x4 nights (159m)
May 6th Heber, UT Mountain Valley RVR (2 overnights) x7n 234m
May 16th Bend, OR TT (Overnights and stays TBD) (654m)(x7n)
June 5th Whaler’s Rest in Newport, OR.
June 26th leave Whaler’s Rest
*****************************************
3.18.2019 Day 1 -The Blue Route Grand Canyon

Bright Angel… revisiting the East Rim of the Grand Canyon

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Our site is located in the Bright Angel area. This is where we visited almost eight years ago with Abby. Yup, that’s us. Sitting on a wall with an 1800 foot drop behind us. But it made for a good picture.I won’t go into detail but I’ll let you imagine what we might be expecting at this elevation!

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In the picture above are the San Francisco Peaks. At this point there still about twenty miles from us. Yea, the answer to the question posed above: snow, sleet and cold temps.

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This is our campground and a herd of dear just came over to visit. DO NOT FEED THE WILDLIFE, is what all the signs are telling us. At Cottonwood, just the opposite was true. They even provided the food. We’ll be visiting the Kolb studio shortly. It’s a story of two early 1900’s photographers that made a reputation for themselves as daredevil photographers.

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This is what we came here to see. Below of course is us again.

And, of course, the happy couple

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Once again, it’s what we came here to see!

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No I don’t know this young girl, but she’s sitting on the edge of an 1800 foot cliff to the bottom for the canyon, I just don’t understand her thinking.

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The Kolb museum and gift store.

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On the outside deck of the Kolb station.

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Looking back on to the Bright Angel Inn and restaurant.

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More awesome views. Below is a view of a natural bridge on the mountain path to the canyon bottom. Carla, Abby and I walked this path about nine years ago. We passed on it this time.

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Above is a canoe of that period of time in a glass case and the blocks you see is a primitive  life jacket made from chunks of cork.

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Walking to the transfer Station. This is where you get off the our bus and board a GC city bus to your location.

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The transfer station. It took us over 30 minutes before we caught a ride.

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Got a chance to meet Sue and Mark on our ride back to the campground.

 

3.19.2019 Day 2 -Red Tour-Grand Canyon-West Rim
Carla kills the fireplace blower.

The chart above show us the designated viewing locations that the bus will stop at. One bus will drop off and 15 minutes later another bus will do a pick up and go to the next stop. View from our first stop below.

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As you know there are two tours currently a tour being offered; The East Rim and the West Rim. There’s also to the North  Rim, but the North rim is closed until May. The bus stops at certain designated areas, viewing spots, and another bus comes by every fifteen minutes for visitors to board and go to the next viewing spot. Below you see the view from this location. n the center of the picture s the Colorado River (brown water).

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Now we go wait for the next bus. There is an option, you could walk to each of these stops but were to old for such a diversion. The person in the picture below is much younger and has more years than we do, she’s walking.

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Another awesome view from our bus on our way to the next stop. Below, time to leave this venue and wait for another bus.

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About the above pictures. Geologists have determined that about three-thousand years ago the picture on the left looked very much like the picture on the right. That damming up of the Colorado river was caused by a slow oozing of lava from the bottom of the canyon. This to can be Googled. 

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Just a two minute break to rest our feet. This sojourn may not look that taxing, but were both getting a little tired. The more we see the more it all looks the same.

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Here’s where we cheated, and you did not even notice. We’re tired! Because of our sudden lack of energy made the decision to skip the last two venues. Instead we opted to proceed to the end of the Red Tour which is Hermit’s Rest. There’s a nice story behind the name but to much for this blog… Google it!

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It took a forty-five minute drive to get us from Hermit’s Rest to the transfer station and it will take another twenty minutes to reach our destination; our campground! Enough for today, I need a nap. Below, hole we wait for our city bus another deer or two show up and show off.

Below, finally, our campground. It’s about a ten minute walk from where the city bus drops us off and we made it. Nice to be home again. I think were going to do nothing tomorrow…

 

3.20.2019 Day 3 Grand Canyon
Rain expected.

 

 

3.21.2019 Day 4 GC- Depart for Vegas for 4 nights.
Dump tanks and prepare to leave for Vegas.

 

 


“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

 

Montezuma Well

 

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journals…or click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
14. March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x 14 nights (A section!!)
15. March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground for 4 nights
16. March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights

*****************************************

3.14.2019 1pm Thursday

The text italicized h’s been taken from Wikipedia

Archaeological evidence suggests that humans have lived in the Verde Valley for at least 10,000 years. The earliest signs of permanent settlement in the area appear quite a bit later, however, around 600 CE.

It only took about 30 minutes for us to get here,
awesome! About 15 miles.

The ruins of several prehistoric dwellings are scattered in and around the rim of the Well. Their erstwhile inhabitants belonged to several indigenous American cultures that are believed to have occupied the Verde Valley between 700 and 1425 CE, the foremost of which being a cultural group archaeologists have termed the Southern Sinagua.[3] The earliest of the ruins located on the property (with the exception of the irrigation canal), a “pithouse” in the traditional Hohokam style, dates to about 1050 CE. More than 50 countable “rooms” are found inside the park boundaries; it is likely that some were used for purposes other than living space, including food storage and religious ceremonies.

No fees involved just a few rules to obey.

 

The Sinagua people, and possibly earlier cultures, intensively farmed the land surrounding the Well using its constant outflow as a reliable source of irrigation. Beginning about 700 CE, the Well’s natural drainage into the immediately adjacent Wet Beaver Creek was diverted into a man-made canal running parallel to the creek, segments of which still conduct the outflow today.

What’s involved here is to ascend about 300 feet to see the Well.
The well is in an area where a source of water is scarce.

The prehistoric canal, estimated at nearly seven miles in length, likely drained into a network of smaller lateral canals downstream, supplying perhaps as much as 60 acres of farmland with water.[3] The route of the modern canal is partly original, especially close to the outlet, but large portions have been re-routed over time as irrigation needs have changed.

People were living here from the 1100’s.
This Well was considered by them to be sacred.
This climb is much steeper than the picture indicates.

 

Much of the abandoned original route is still visible within the park, however, as the warm water emerging from the Well contains a high concentration of lime, which over many centuries was deposited along the canal walls as the water cooled downstream; the accumulated lime has since hardened into a cement-like coating, preserving the canal’s shape.since hardened into a cement-like coating, preserving the canal’s shape.

This picture is really all about the cacti plants.

The existence of the Well was almost unknown to European Americans before the publishing of Handbook to Arizona by Richard J. Hinton in 1878. In 1968, Montezuma Well was the subject of the first ever underwater archaeological survey to take place in a federally managed park, led by archaeologist George R Fischer.

This is what the climb was all about.
We were told that the
water has always been arsenic laced.

 

the Yavapai people consider the Well a deeply sacred site, as they believe it is the place through which they emerged into the world.

The trip was nice and the knowledge acquired was extremely interesting. Not sure if I would make the trip again.


“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Montezuma Castle

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journals…or click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

This month’s Travel Plans:
14. March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x 14 nights (A section!!)
15. March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground for 4 nights
16. March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights

*****************************************

3.14.2019-Thursday-we visit Montezuma Castle and Montezuma Well

The italicized text is courtesy of the National Park Service (NPS)

The nice part of these two venues is their location, within a 30 minute ride from this campground. Both venues were very interesting but not as interesting as I had hoped for.

We must check in and present our Park Pass with accompanying ID, nice part, no money is exchanged.

On December 8, 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt celebrated the passage of the Antiquities Act by declaring four sites of historic and cultural significance as our nation’s first National Monuments. Among these was Montezuma Castle, which the President identified as a place “of the greatest ethnological value and scientific interest.”

This is like taking a stroll in the park. 
The cement path is about six-feet wide.

Although very few original artifacts remained in the structure due to intensive looting of the site, Roosevelt’s decision assured the continued protection of one of the best preserved prehistoric cliff dwellings in North America.

Below..A Sycamore Tree. The ancestors use them extensively
in the construction of their cliff homes and ladders.

Montezuma Castle National Monument quickly became a destination for America’s first car-bound tourists. In 1933, “Castle A”, a 45-50 room, pueblo ruin was excavated, uncovering a wealth of artifacts and greatly enhanced our understanding of the Sinagua people who inhabited this riparian “oasis” along Beaver Creek for over 400 years.

This is the same river, the Verde River, 
that runs in back of our campground. 
This section of the river is called Beaver Creek.

Early visitors to the monument were allowed access to the structure by climbing a series of ladders up the side of the limestone cliffs. However, due to extensive damage to this valuable cultural landmark, public access of the ruins was discontinued in 1951.

This is what we came here to see.  the wall is a four-level living  quarters that housed dozens of people. In the next picture you’ll see a schematic. In the pictures that will follow arena additional living spaces used by these peoples. 

Now, approximately 350,000 people a year gaze through the windows of the past during a visit to Montezuma Castle. Even 600 years after their departure, the legacy of the Sinagua people continues to inspire the imaginations of this and future generations.

If you could remove the front wall this is what you would see.

Your neighbors would live in these cut-outs. The stone here is mostly limestone which is very soft but the dark/black rock you also see is Manganese a very hard rock.

“Everything we were, we carry with us.
 Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not traveled yet." pjgrenier

			

Jerome, AZ

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
14. March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x 14 nights
15. March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground X 4 nights
16. March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground X 14 nights

*****************************************

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Our trip to Jerome was just as inspiring as all  our trips in this beautiful state. Every rod we travel look like they are no more than five-years old; awesome!


DSC_4681dd At this location we can see Jerome in the distance. These rusting machines of the past are symbolic of the mining tools that grew Jerome in the past.

The Italicized text to follow courtesy of the Jerome Historical Society

History of Jerome, Arizona
4686-Jerome was built on Cleopatra Hill above a vast deposit of copper. Prehistoric Native Americans were the first miners, seeking colored stones. The Spanish followed, seeking gold but finding copper. Anglos staked the first claims in the area in 1876,
and United Verde mining operations began in 1883, followed by the Little Daisy claim.

jerome1927Jerome grew rapidly from tent city to prosperous company town as it followed the swing of the mine’s fortunes. The mines, the workers, and those who sought its wealth, formed Jerome’s colorful history.Americans, Mexicans, Croatians, Irish, Spaniards, Italians, and Chinese made the mining camp a cosmopolitan mix that added to its rich life and excitement.Historic Jerome 2Jerome was the talk of the Territory, a boom town of its time, the darling of promoters and investors. The mines were nourished and exploited by financiers who brought billions of dollars in copper, gold, and silver from its depths. Changing times in the Territory saw pack burros, mule drawn freight wagons, and horses replaced by steam engines, autos, and trucks.

Fires ravaged the clapboard town and landslides destroyed whole sections. Jerome was always rebuilt. At the mercy of the ups and downs of copper prices, labor unrest, depressions and wars, Jerome’s mines finally closed in 1953.

Jerome Today

jerome sidewalkAfter the mines closed in 1953 and “King Copper” left town, the population went from a peak of 15,000 in the 1920s to a low of 50 people. The Jerome Historical Society guarded the buildings against vandalism and the elements, the Douglas Mansion became a State Park in 1965, and Jerome became a National Historic Landmark in 1976. During the 60’s and 70’s, during the time of the counter culture, Jerome offered a haven for artists.

Soon newcomers and Jerome old timers were working together to bring Jerome back to life. Today, Jerome is very much alive with writers, artists, artisans, musicians, historians, and families. They form a peaceful, colorful, thriving community built on a rich foundation of history and lore.

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4703dd -This is the miner created cross of nails and hammers. Above is another  example of Arizona’s creative road décor.

Below is a closed mining camp.

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"Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Holy Family Church in Jerome, AZ

To view the Journal for MARCH click on this link GOTO MARCH Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

This month’s Travel Plans:
14. March 4th Cottonwood, AZ at Verde Valley RVP (TT) x 14 nights (A section!!)
15. March 18th Grand Canyon Village at GC Campground for 4 nights
16. March 22nd Las Vegas at Las Vegas TT Campground for 14 nights

*****************************************

3.10.2019 

New Life for Holy Family Catholic Church, Jerome AZ…

Posted on by Diane Rapport-November 26, 2014

Scott Kola, wasn’t always Catholic. He was a renegade from growing up in a family of conservative Orthodox Jews with a Rabbi father and converted to Catholicism eleven years ago. Today, he lives in the Holy Family Catholic Church’s convent, where he can monitor day-to-day restoration. The Holy Family Catholic Church in Jerome AZ, built in 1896, then rebuilt a few years later after it burned down, is the town’s oldest church. Image courtesy Wikimedia.

A year and a half ago, Scott outlined the structural problems of the church and his dreams for renovation to Father David Kalesh, pastor of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Cottonwood. The three-story brick and stone back wall facing Main Street is bowed, its foundation crumbling, mortar for its brick and stone façade in need of repointing. Not surprising for a building that was built in 1896, burned in the fire of 1898, and was rebuilt as a brick and stone structure in 1899-1900. It was known as the ‘miner’s church.

Father David and Scott Kolu became strong allies. Together they are bringing Jerome’s Holy Family Catholic Church back to life. Father David conducts Mass on the third Saturday of each month at 8:30 a.m. When long-time and much loved Jerome resident Don Walsh died in late September, a funeral service was held to a packed church of family and friends. “The church has immense historic value,” Father David told me. “Most important are the memories the church holds for former parishioners and their families who visit Jerome. I would like to help the church become the polished jewel that it once was.”

The Pipe Organ

The organ, designed especially for smaller churches, was built by the

prestigious Kilgen and Sons Pipe Organ Company in St. Louis in the early nineteen hundreds. Only two others of the same compact design still remain in the United States. (Perhaps the most well known Kilgen church pipe organ is housed in St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Manhattan.)

“We are ecstatic that Mr. Charles Kegg, President and Artistic Director of Kegg Pipe Organ Builders (www.keggorgan.com) is willing to take on the restoration project,” Scott said. I sent an email to Mr. Kegg and asked him why. “I would like to restore it to its original condition so that it can remain an example of this almost extinct style of American pipe organ,” he said. “The pipe organ in Jerome is rather unusual. . . It was being sent to a place where electricity probably didn’t exist at all at the time, so this organ was built using methods from the mid-19th century and with the intention that it must play under difficult circumstances with little or no maintenance. This was not uncommon at all for remote locations. . . Jerome must have been an outpost much more remote than other locations that would want a pipe organ. Another thing that makes it unusual is that it has survived, virtually intact.”

The article was first published in the Verde Independent newspaper in Cottonwood, AZ on November 18. The photo gallery of Vyto Starkinskas’ photos are spectacular. http://verdenews.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=63344

(Diane Sward Rapaport is the author of Home Sweet Jerome: Death and Rebirth of Arizona’s Richest Copper Mining City. The blogs are different from the stories that are included in the book.) 

© 2019 – Home Sweet Jerome

 

Shootout at the OK Coral


HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

 

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
7. Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
4. Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (71m)
5. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
6. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
7. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
8. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x13 nights
Phoenix, AZ overnight

*****************************************

2.25.2019…Shootout at the OK Coral

DSC_4203.jpgK
.On October 26, 1881 The Earp brothers had a shootout with the Ike and Billie Clanton  Frank  McLaury and Billy Claiborne. Unlike television, in this shootout the good guys wore black.


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The Earp Brothers, Virgil, Wyatt and Morgan, with Doc Holiday. I believe that Wyatt was the Tombstone Marshall..Below…the bad guys. .members of the Clanton family.
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This shootout at the OK Coral did not actually take place at high noon, but a little after 1PM. It wasn’t a long battle, about thirty seconds.

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.The bad guy came out the losers. Ike and Billie and left the town wounded.Wyatt, I believe, was not shot unlike his brothers and Doc Holiday.

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After the OK Coral incident Wyatt went on for several years looking for a town that his talents would help only to search in despair. A Sheriff who witnessed the shootout the good guys were charged with murder, only to have those charges dismissed.
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DSC_4219.jpgK

“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us,  
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

 


			

Boothill, Tombstone, AZ

To view the Journal for FEBRUARY click on this link goto February Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
7. Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
4. Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (71m)
5. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
6. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
7. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
8. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x13 nights
Phoenix, AZ overnight

*****************************************

 

2.25.2019 Boothill

Boothill

Our trip to Boothill in Tombstone, AZ was very pleasant. Our Experience at Boothill proved to be more than we expected. Boothill, in Tombstone, is another Arizona town that tells of its history in murals.

 

 

 

 

 

 



Italicized text-From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Originally called Boothill Cemetery, the graveyard was founded in 1878.[4] After a new city cemetery was built elsewhere, the old cemetery stopped accepting new burials in about 1883 (save for very few exceptions) and fell into disrepair until the 1940s, when the city began to restore and preserve it.

A gift shop and the place your purchase your entry ticket.

In order to attract tourists, some of the Boot Hill grave sites are falsely marked, and fictitious claims of burials have been made by the cemetery’s various operators over the years.

4162

 

 

 

  • Lester Moore, with the famous epitaph “Here lies Lester Moore, Four slugs from a .44, No Les No more.” Lester Moore was purportedly a Wells, Fargo & Co. station agent in the border town of Naco who died in a shootout with Hank Dunstan over a mangled package.[4] There was never anyone named Lester Moore who was killed in Arizona Territory,[citation needed] and there is no evidence to indicate where Dunstan (who also died in the purported shootout) was buried.

  • George Johnson, with epitaph “Here lies George Johnson, hanged by mistake 1882. He was right we were wrong. But we strung him up and now he’s gone.”
  • John Heath, accused of organizing the robbery that led to the 1883 Bisbee massacre, has a grave marker near the grave of the five perpetrators of the massacre. John Heath was arrested and convicted, and was later removed by a mob from the Tombstone jail and lynched on February 22, 1884.[7] However, he was not buried in Boothill Cemetery; his body was returned to his estranged wife in Terrell, Texas, and was buried there in Oakland Cemetery.

  • Thomas Harper is another badman supposedly buried in Boothill Cemetery. He was a friend of Curly Bill Brocius and was hanged for murder by Sheriff Bob Paul in Tucson on July 8, 1881.[8] Harper was buried in Tucson, not in Tombstone.
  • Federico Duran, spelled as “Fiderico Doran” on the grave marker, who was claimed to have been killed by Sheriff John Slaughter after the Agua Zarca train robbery in 1888. In fact, Duran and train robber Jack Taylor were executed by firing squad in Guaymas, Mexico in December 1889.[9] Slaughter had nothing to do with their deaths and Duran was not buried in Tombstone.
    Below the graves of the bad guys at the OK Coral.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


“Everything we were, we carry with us.
Everything we will be, is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Pima County Boneyard

To view the Journal for FEBRUARY click on this link goto February Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.
HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
7. Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
4. Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (71m)
5. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
6. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
7. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
8. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x13 nights
Phoenix, AZ overnight

**********************************************

2.20.2019-Pima County Boneyard

(The bold/italicized text below has been taken from Wikipedia)

A large number of the museum’s aircraft are displayed outside with the remainder located in one of the museum’s four display hangars.[1] In addition to the display hangars, the museum has a restoration hangar.[2]

Opened to the public in May 1976 with 48 aircraft then on display, the Museum’s main hangar houses an SR-71A Blackbird, an A-10 Warthog, a United States Air Force Through the Years exhibit, and a mock-up of a control tower.

I believe this is a C-130. Tom Ward used to pilot a plane like this when he was deployed.

The museum is adjacent to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. The 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG), affiliated with the base, also known as the “Graveyard of Planes” or “The Boneyard”, is the largest aircraft storage and preservation facility in the world. Bus tours of the boneyard leave from the museum several times a day from Monday to Friday, except Federal holidays.

The nearby Titan Missile Museum is located about 20 miles south of Tucson in Green Valley off of Interstate 19 and features a Titan II intercontinental ballistic missile still in its silo. Tours of the above-ground and underground installations around the missile are conducted daily. More extensive “top-to-bottom” tours take up to five hours and are conducted several times each month. Reservations are required for a top-to-bottom tour.

Both museums are overseen by the Arizona Aerospace Foundation and are governed by the board of trustees. They are a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization that rely on visitors paying admissions, for trams and AMARG tours, as well as what they spend in the museum stores. They also rely on memberships and contracted events to pay to restore and acquire exhibits.

The museum opened to the public on May 8, 1976. In early 1982 the first hangar on the site was completed. A second was built in 1987, a third in 1992, and a fourth in 1994. In 2012, the museum collaborated with artists, in The Boneyard Project, to place some abandoned aircraft on display as canvases for art.

During 2015, Boeing donated to the museum the second 787 aircraft to be built. It is exhibited in the colors of the 787 customer. In November 2016, Orbis International donated their first McDonnell-Douglas DC-10 Flying Eye Hospital to the museum, after receiving a second DC-10 from FedEx. The DC-10, which was the oldest flying example of its type at the time of its donation, is being restored for display at Davis–Monthan Air Force Base.[8]

"Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, 
is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Mission San Xavier

To view the Journal for FEBRUARY click on this link goto February Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.
HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
7. Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
4. Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (71m)
5. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
6. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
7. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
8. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x13 nights
Phoenix, AZ overnight

*****************************************

2.20.2019

The text below in bold and italic was taken from Wikipedia.

Mission San Xavier del Bac (Spanish: Misión de San Xavier del Bac) is a historic Spanish Catholic mission located about 10 miles (16 km) south of downtown Tucson, Arizona, on the Tohono O’odham Nation San Xavier Indian Reservation.

Fr. Francis Xavier rest at the founder of the Mission and co-founder of the Society of Jesus

The mission was founded in 1692 by Padre Eusebio Kino[1] in the center of a centuries-old Indian settlement of the Sobaipuri O’odham who were a branch of the Akimel or River O’odham, located along the banks of the Santa Cruz River. The mission was named for Francis Xavier, a Christian missionary and co-founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuit Order) in Europe.

o

At the end of this tour you’ll find vendors, local parishioners, cooking and

selling fried bread to us, the tourists. The bread was delicious. After sampling the bread Sue and Tom drove us to a Mexican restaurant in Tucson where we enjoyed an excellent Mexican meal. We went to the Mi Nidito Restaurant, Bill Clinton, as well as, many other celebrities and athletes as well. The food is great but the parking leaves much to be desired.

The original church was built to the north of the present Franciscan church. This northern church or churches served the mission until being razed during an Apache raid in 1770.

Today’s Mission was built between 1783-1797; it is the oldest European structure in Arizona; the labor was provided by the O’odham.[1] An outstanding example of Spanish Colonial architecture in the United States, it hosts some 200,000 visitors each year.

Below sue Ward listens to our tour guide.

Tom Ward and Carla lead the way our tour guide is going.

The site is also known in the O’odham language as “goes in” or comes in: meaning “where the water goes in”, as the water in the Santa Cruz came up to the surface a couple of miles south of Martinez HIll and then submerged again near Los Reales Wash. The Santa Cruz River that used to run year round in this section, once critical to the community’s survival, now runs only part of the year.

The Mission is a pilgrimage site, with thousands visiting each year on foot[4] and on horseback, some among ceremonial cavalcades, or cabalgatas in Spanish.

This mural is high above the left side of the church. You will only see it in this church. It is a mural of Mary, Mother of Jesus, diapering the infant Jesus. This may not be that clear but at the same time it’s over one-hundred years old. Not one thing I’ve ever done will be around 100 years from now.

“Everything we were, we carry with us. 
Everything we will be, is calling to us,  
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Medina Dam

 

2.06.19-The Medina Dam…Not to much to say about this venue. We came, we saw and we left.

The history of the Medina Dam below is from the :© 2019 Medina Lake Preservation Society.
got Medina Dam History

The historic Medina Dam was completed in 1912 and Medina Lake was filled by 1913. The dam is a historical landmark, registered by the Texas Historical Commission and the American Society of Civil Engineers. The lake is approximately 18 miles long and three miles wide at its widest. The surrounding hills are composed of mostly fractured karst limestone covered in ash juniper, oak, persimmon, black walnut and (occasionally) madrona trees. Towering cypress grows near the Medina River and its tributaries. Medina Lake, combined with the Diversion Lake below the main dam, create the single largest recharge source for the entire Edwards Aquifer.

The Medina Lake Dam was designated a state historical landmark in 1976 by the Texas Historical Commission and was entered into The National Register of Historic Places at that time. The dam was also recognized as a civil engineering landmark in 1991 by the American Civil Engineering Society and a plaque with that designation sits on the dam, alongside the Historical Commission plaque. Today, the area that is known as Mormon’s Bluff was the site of one of the first Mormon colonies in Texas. A third plaque sits on the dam recognizing this settlement.

Three books have been written specifically about the history of Medina Lake, the first by the Reverend Cyril Matthew Kuehne, originally published by St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, entitled “Ripples From Medina Lake”. This book is currently being reprinted by the Castro Colonies Historical Society in Castroville. It is available at the Castroville Chamber of Commerce.

“Everything we were, we carry with us. Everything we will be, is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet.” pjgrenier



The Alamo

xx

To view the Journal for FEBRUARY click on this link goto February Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear missing, use your “refresh” button.
HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
7. Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
8. Feb. 1st Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
9. Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (71m)
10. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
11. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
12. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
13. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x13 nights
14. March 3rd Phoenix, AZ overnight
*****************************************

02.06.19- the Alamo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This picture and the building portrayed in it has nothing to do with the Alamo, except that you’ll see this building as you enter San Antonio. This facility is as big as a FedEx or Sam’s distribution centers. It’s the “Food Pantry” distribution center for san Antonio, Texas. It is unbelievably big.

Above right are the garrisons, but at the time of the battle this area was use to store ammunition. To thlef is the Alamo gift Shop. Below is a monument dedicated to the heroes of the Alamo, over two-hundred in number. Below to the right is a picture of the Oak Tree planted at the Alamo in commemoration of the fallen. 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above is a blow-up of the list of names on the monument. Bowie and Crockett were the two I knew about the most. Below Carla is talking to a Texas Ranger asking him for directions to the San Fernando Cathedral.

“Everything we were, we carry with us. Everything we will be, is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet.” pjgrenier


			

Johnson Space Center

To view the Journal for JANUARY click on this link goto January Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu. If pictures appear to be missing, using your “refresh” button helps them reappear.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

 

This month’s Travel Plans:
7.  Jan. 20th Willis, TX at Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights. (190m)
8.  Feb. 1st Seguin, TX -Overnight (156m)
9.  Feb. 2nd Lakehills, TX at Medina Lake RVR (TT) x 13 nights (182m)
10. Feb. 15th Fort Stockton, TX overnight
11. Feb. 16th El Paso, TX – overnight
12. Feb. 17th Deming, NM overnight
13. Feb. 18th Benson, AZ at Valley Vista RVR(T3) x 13 nights

*****************************************

1.28.19-Johnson Space Center-We awoke around 7am anxious for this day for visiting the Johnson Space Center. Carla is feeling a little better but still sneezing from time to time. After a light breakfast and proper clothing to counter the 37 degree weather we were on our way. Traveling through Houston was a whit-knuckle experience.

This group of fly-overs wasn’t even the biggest, felt bad we missed that shot. It had a series of 5 levels high. Below is the Houston skyline. Tragic n this shot was light, I never want to travel I-45 through the city again.


Yea, we made it. The drive here was definitely an “E” ticket experience. Carla, Abby and I were fortunate enough to experience a 747 carrying a Shuttle back to Kennedy many years ago. It was such a rare event that, many times, the 747 pilot would do his own creative flight plan before landing. Many times flying north and south along the coastline to be a little boastful.


This would be our first of several venues today, buying tickets and viewing the Space Center Museum. Below are a few shots of the inside of this venue.

I kind of  liked this picture below, a roadmap to the galaxy. Then another shot of the complex.

Below this guy is explaining the technique of going to the bathroom, you know #2, in space. It involves the use of suction. I won’t go into details on this but will let you use your imagination. Below this same guy tried to get this volunteer to drink Space Station generated water. Must I go into detail as to where the Space Station gets this primary source of water. The volunteer did not oblige the host in trying this highly purified water. Did you really think he would?

 

Above  is an animation showing a candle (on the left ) as it would glow on earth and the same candle, on the right and how it would glow on the space Station, in outer space. The question here is why! A tour of the complex by tram will be next.

 

Yes, we can thank Disney for creating “waiting stalls” even at JSC, but the line was short. These are long horn Texas steers grazing on the JSC property. I did not hear the entire story but I think they had to be permitted as part of the buy-out or lease deal on the property.


Some of the research buildings on the property, for got their particulars.


We’re in the last building shown above where they build stuff and the train on it. The big white drums are actually, I think, living modules for the astronauts. Below is unique. The “green” capsule, lower left corner is actually the Russian capsule that our astronauts come home in from the Space Station. Our government pays $2M for a ticket for this ride.


Pictures above and below are about the “Orion” capsule. This is the new phase of our space program. Almost feels like we’re going backwards, especially after experiencing the Shuttles. Very much like the Mercury capsules more window, but yet no bathrooms or exercise room.


Once again, these are “living quarters modules” that will some day go back to the moon or Mars.


Above at the top of the picture are the many awards students have won as they worked on actual space projects t this NASA center. Some of their achievements can be seen on the floor, mostly in the realm of robotics. Below, I know, nobody here looks very busy, I agree.


We’re off again to see what’s in the next building, the Saturn Rocket building. Below see the bikes. These are the original bikes dating from the beginnings of the Space Center. Schwinn comes in once a years and refurbishes them for the years to come.

On this plot of soil trees have been planted with placards in commemoration of those that have contributed greatly to the program. Below, I just liked the picture.


Some information on the Saturn Rocket. Your computer can enlarge the information.


The Saturn Rocket, the heaviest, biggest and most powerful rocket built. There’s so much information on this rocket I’ll let you Google it. One particular item, it’s 360 feet in length. Just a few pictures on this beast.
zzz

This is the actual rocket, not a mock-up. There are only three left; Cape Kennedy, Atlanta and here in Houston.
The Apollo Mission Astronauts:
 
Now off to the Shuttle:

Above: there was no sign that aid Do Not Touch The Space Rock, so I touched it. Below the sin read touch the rock from the moon, why not, so we did. It was in a heavily fortified case of glass and steel with an opening barely big enough for a hand to fit inside. No chance of taking this artifact.

Some pictures from the space Shuttle:

Now off to the 747 transport plane:

NASA owned and operated two of these 747’s. The plane above made nine of these piggy-back trips.


“Everything we were, we carry with us.
Everything we will be, is calling to us, from the roads not travelled yet.” pjgrenier


			

Battleship Alabama, Mobile Bay

To view the Journal for JANUARY click on this link goto January Journalsor click on the “header at the top of this page, select “Journals” for the drop-down menu.
If pictures appear to be missing, using your “refresh” button helps them reappear.

HAPPINESS is to have EVERYTHING
you NEED,
NOT the NEED to have EVERYTHING

This month’s Travel Plans:
2. Jan. 14th Lake City, FL Overnight (147m)
3. Jan. 15th Marianna, GA Overnight (169m)
4. Jan. 16th Robertsdale,AL-Wilderness RVP (RPI)x4 days(165m)
5. Jan. 18th Hammond, LA Overnight (183m)
6. Jan. 19th Lafayette, LA- Overnight
7. Jan. 20th Willis, TX Lake Conroe (TT) RVP x 12 nights.

******************************************************************
01.16.19- BATTLSHIP ALABAMA
 
The Alabama from its humble beginnings on February 1, 1940 as the keel was laid at the Norfolk Navy Yard in Portsmouth, Virginia, Battleship USS ALABAMA (BB-60) has had a remarkable career.  

She began her World War II adventures in the North Atlantic in 1943, then later that year, went to the South Pacific seas.  She ended up in Mobile, Alabama as a National Historic Landmark and memorial to millions.
Captains quarters below:


Home to a crew of 2,500 courageous Americans, this 45,000 ton gentle giant’s WWII adventure culminated with BB-60 leading the American Fleet into Tokyo Bay on September 5, 1945.  Nine Battle Stars for meritorious service were awarded the “Mighty A” during her brief three year tenure as the “Heroine of the Pacific”.
At the bottom center of the picture below shows a large metal container with a hatch door going into it… Why? It wasn’t until the end of the visit that we met with Mr. Kramer, ret. Navy, who explained that the crew virtually lives on potatoes. Potatoes come on board and are brought into this metal room and then are dropped several levels as you see in the picture below this picture.

Most American warships end their useful life after wartime, but ALABAMA was destined to live another day. In May 1962, the Federal Government announced that BB-60 and others would be scrapped, but a forward-looking group of Mobilians and other Alabamians saw a bright future in the aging warship. 

Below is a schematic of the Alabama. The luxury of a computer image is that you can enlarge the image to better view the details of this ship. 

Pictures above and below show Carla so all can see the magnitude of everything on this ship. The cannons below can deliver a missile over twenty miles away with amazing accuracy.

Some views below of the engine room of the Alabama.
 

They envisioned the ALABAMA as the anchor attraction of a Veterans Memorial Park to be located in Mobile.  That impossible dream came true on January 9, 1965 when USS ALABAMA Battleship Memorial Park opened to the public.

Navigation room

More than fifteen million visitors later and a statewide economic impact approaching one billion dollars, the Park is easily the most recognizable symbol of the State of Alabama.

 Dedicated to all Alabama Citizens who have worn the uniform of all branches of the United States Armed Forces, the Park’s numerous artifacts, exhibits, and displays all point to the fact that the Park is America’s most unique military attraction.  Come see for yourself.
(Utilized text courtesy of the USAAlabama.com website)


The crane at the bow of the ship was used sea on load and off load a sea plane the Alabama carried if needed. Below is the Taylor Shop for the ship.

“Everything we were, we carry with us.
Everything we will be is calling to us, 
from the roads not travelled yet." pjgrenier

			

Chattooga Distillery

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Go to the bottom of the right column to “Follow our adventures.” then Click on “Profile”…
HAPPINESS IS:
To have EVERYTHING you NEED / not the NEED to have EVERYTHING.
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10.24 Wednesday-
This trip will ultimately bring us to three separate venues.
We were just casually driving on our way to the next waterfall when this sign jumped out at us. I mean, could you just drive by without checking out some “Moonshine?” The first of the three venues was this typical general store. It sold everything from grass seed to liquors.

We were there only a few minutes when the storekeeper told us of their other location was bigger and had a better selection; so off we went.

Just up the road from the country store was this very symbolic western town. It wasn’t just a façade, all the storefronts were occupied. Some of the units had, sheriff, barber shop, ammunition and a restaurant/B&B. Below, I’m not sure. A little to small for a “tiny home!”  I’ll let you contemplate other options.
 
The views from this part of the world are awesome! We’re up high enough so we can see for miles. Below is the second venue.


This property is years of creative building and plantings. Above is a silo with an herb garden in the forefront. Rows and rows of grape vines, not to mention other plantings.  This is the area in the back of this building. Mostly used for large group meetings and weddings.

The storekeeper back in the original location was right. Much more stuff to look over and purchase. Jams and liquors are very noticeable. Yes, we did not leave empty handed.

Below is another gathering area, smaller than the outside area. The fireplace was awesome.


The views are as awesome as the plantings around the property.

Our third and last venue in this area was just up the road, where else, was a distillery. Ben was the barkeep. The storekeeper gave us his name.  I have a feeling this is one very bi family operation, I might be wrong, but I feels like it. More vineyards below.


Last time we saw Llamas was n a farm in Maggie Valley. What is it about Llamas?


Our last look of mama Llama. It’s time to leave. Off to our final destination which would be “just down the road.” For more information on this venue: goto: Chattooga Belle Farm

Issaqueena Falls, Walhalla SC

Please sign up to follow my blog:
Go to the bottom of the right column to “Follow our adventures.” then Click on “Profile”…
HAPPINESS IS:
To have EVERYTHING you NEED / not the NEED to have EVERYTHING.
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10.24- Wednesday-


The road to this location was very relaxing and would be awesome if we were more timely with the foliage.

The couple in this RV were from Lake Placid, FL. Lake Placid is known as the Mural City. They were not full-timers but did spend a good part of the year traveling. I did a blog on Lake Placid about three years ago.
The Legend] of Issaqueena
Many versions of the story of Issaqueena exist. One such tale tells us Issaqueena was a Cherokee girl who fell in love with an Oconee Brave, while another regales the story of a young girl named Issaqueena who was captured by the Cherokee and given the name Cateechee.

“Cateechee” then met and fell in love with a white trader named Allan Francis. Yet another variant has Issaqueena falling in love with a white silversmith named David Francis.

This is a covered bridge that spans the stream leading to the falls. This is a very small narrow stream. How it manages to transform itself to such a beautiful waterfall baffles me. Early on we begin seeing the beginnings of the falls not to mention the beautiful sounds of water falling freely

As you walk through the covered bridge to the other side you come to an observation area looking down to the stream and looking out over the hills.

Regardless of who Issaqueena fell in love with, the numerous adaptations all end roughly the same way.
Issaqueena overhears her tribesmen planning a surprise attack and sets out ahead of the braves to warn her lover — naming the local landmarks of Mile Creek, Six Mile, Twelve Mile, Eighteen Mile, Three and Twenty, Six and Twenty, and finally Ninety Six along the way. The towns of Six Mile, Ninety Six and the creeks still exist.

She then marries Allan/David/Oconee brave and starts a family. The family then builds (depending on the story) either a “stumphouse” home or a home on Stumphouse Mountain, just north of what is now Walhalla. Her tribesmen, still seeking revenge for their spoiled attack plan, finally track down Issaqueena and chase her through the woods. She eludes her pursuers by leaping off a nearby waterfall.

The tribesmen, believing her to be dead, call off their chase and Issaqueena, who had actually landed on a ledge and hid out of sight behind the great wall of water, was able to return safely to her family and live happily ever after.

The rendition with the Oconee brave has them both throwing themselves over the falls rather then die at the hands of the Cherokee while the narrative with David Francis has the happy couple ending up in Alabama.
The Legend of Issaqueena is a prime example of local lore shaping an area but historians frequently disagree about how much (if any) truth is surrounding the story.

The trail to the falls is steep at times but not dangerous to most visitors. I, on the other hand have recently become a klutz at walking, and am slightly more cautious than most.

The downhill path Harkins the thoughts of having to walk this same path, next time, going all the way uphill.

For one, according to local author and Cherokee language historian John Currahee, the name “Issaqueena” is actually the transplanted Choctaw word “isi-okhina” meaning “deer creek.”

“(The legend) may have some vague factual basis but the Indian maiden’s name was not given until 1895 when she was called ‘Cateechee’ in an essay,” stated Currahee. “It was not until 1898 that Cateechee became Issaqueena in a poem, the duality explained by saying that Issaqueena was a Choctaw captured by the Cherokee and given the name Cateechee among the Cherokee.

“Both the poet and the essayist owned up to inventing the two names out of thin air, although the poet seemed to know that Issaqueena did come from the Choctaw language,” Currahee said.
The poem Currahee was referring to is the epic “Cateechee of Keowee” penned by J.W. Daniels in 1898.
No matter which — if any — version of the legend a person chooses to believe, the 100-foot waterfall itself is truly a fantastic sight for all and should not be missed.
Story credit – Easley Progress online

What it looks like from the top of the falls

Stumphouse Tunnel, (pic)

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10.24 Wednesday-





No lights in here but plenty of water. We did walk in quite a bit, but I hoping for more.

Looking out from the tunnel.

I uses they had rail service. This is a pretty steep mountain to get up here.

Carla is looking up because we hear voices; just a family doing a hike.

Childress Vineyards (Race-car)

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10.9 –

As I have done in the past the text presented in bold/italics
is courtesy of TripAdvisor.  All texts in “plain type”
would be my own comments.

By opening the doors to Childress Vineyards in 2004,


NASCAR team owner Richard Childress fulfilled a longtime dream that grew from the days when he first began racing in California and visited wineries with friends.

This is the Winery Store Room. They also have a couple of clubs you can join for, what thought, was quite reasonable; around $200 to $250. These clubs come with many benefits, especially if you’re into wines.
What began as camaraderie and good times soon became an engaging passion for world-class wines and then the vision to build a world-class winery.


The Banquet Room used for weddings mostly.
After looking at options in California and New York, Richard chose farmland in Lexington, NC located less than five miles from his RCR Racing operations.

This is the Bristol Room. I was pleasantly surprised at the menu prices. I imagined them to be much more expensive than they were.
The location situated Childress Vineyards as the gateway to the Yadkin Valley American Viticultural Area (AVA), North Carolina’s first federally designated region for grape growing.

Walkway at the beginning of our Winery Tour. The gazebo below may be used or rented for special occasions.

  Childress Vineyards is one of the most prominent wineries in the state’s re-emerging wine industry that has grown from 21 to more than 100 wineries since the year 2000.


This is another Bristol venue for big events. As our tour guide said, everyplace in the winery may be rented except for Richard Childress’ office.  Below is the first step  in the processing of wines; the removal of stems and exterior skin coating.


The building we were in originally was over 35,000 square feet in size. We are now in the basement of that building. Wine is store in these aluminum vats for as long as six weeks. Temperatures down here are really chilly. This enhances the fermentation process. Below the holding tanks are being cleaned out and eventually sterilized prior to new wines enter them.

The aluminum containers store most of the wines they produce. The better and more expensive wines are stores in the wooden kegs. Each of these wooden kegs cost about one-thousand dollars each and may be used only once.

Above is Mark. He runs and controls almost every process in the wine making business at Childress.

This room is for their top of the line wines. Each of these kegs is being exposed to the ground which, once again, enhances the wine fermentation process. Below is the Childress Library of specialty wines. This room is always locked and very few enter as well.

One acre of vineyards can produce four-thousand bottles of wine.

For more information on Childress Vineyards
click on the following link:Childress Vineyards

Appomattox Nat’l Park (pictorial)

10.2-Tuesday- Appomattox National Historic Park
Today looks to be another beautiful day with temps reach no higher than 77 degrees. Our destination is Appomattox Court House (2-words) and Museum. To explain the 2-word item. “Courthouse” refers to just that a court house while a “Court House” makes reference to the county seat; FYI!
This is the actual looks of the McLean House. It was in this house and location that the signing of the surrender of General Lee took place with General Grant.

There’s so much to this venue this is just an intro to our visit there. I should have a blog or possibly a pictorial on this venue in the next day or so. I’m fairly certain that the plaques below will reintroduce you to this part of our history.

In April in 1865 as many as 65,000 troops were encamped on these grounds.
Below just a little history on this part of our history. It would have been to much of an ordeal for me to try to summarize what the National Park Service has already articulated in the text to follow. The NPS text is in bold / italicized print. If the print you see is not BOLD and not italicized then those words are mine commenting on the pictures either above or below my text.
General Robert E . Lee realized that the retreat of his beleaguered army had finally been halted, U. S. Grant was riding toward Appomattox Court House where Union Cavalry, followed by infantry from the V, XXIV, and XXV Corps had blocked the Confederate path.

The field just about a half mile from the McLean House when up to 65,000 troops were encamped both on this side of the road and the other.
Lee had sent a letter to Grant requesting a meeting to discuss his army’s surrender and this letter overtook Grant and his party just before noon about four miles west of Walker’s Church (present-day Hixburg).
Over to the right in this field is a path that we’re directed to  experience.

Grant, who had been suffering from a severe headache, later remembered that upon reading Lee’s letter the pain in his head had disappeared. He stopped to prepare his reply to Lee, writing that he would push to the front to meet him.
A monument dedicated to the Confederate soldiers, mostly North Carolina, in the battle in this area.
The location of the meeting was left to Lee’s discretion. After reading Grant’s letter, Lee, his Aide-de-Camp Lt. Colonel Charles Marshall, and Private Joshua O. Johns rode toward Appomattox Court House Marshall and Johns rode ahead of Lee in order to find a place for the generals to confer.

In those times, around 1865, those who died in battle were generally buried where they had died. In the 1960’s the government decided to have a special cemetery plot for those that died. As you can tell they could only find the remains of a little more than a dozen men. All but one were Confederate soldiers. You’ll notice the first monument which bears the Union Flag was a Union soldier.
As Marshall passed through the village he saw Wilmer McLean in the vicinity of the courthouse. He asked McLean if he knew of a suitable location. Then McLean offered his own home.


Above. The picture on the left is the McLean house in 1865, the one on the right is the current version of that house with 150 years of improvements.
After seeing the comfortable country abode, Marshall readily accepted and sent Private Johns back to inform General Lee that a meeting site had been found.

At first I thought this was an early picture of the Surrender Event, then I realized that “colored pictures” would be way into the future. But, none the less, as you enter the McLean home to the left is this room. It contains many of the original furniture but the signing desks are reproductions. The real stuff is in a national museum.
Lee arrived at the McLean house about one o’clock and took a seat in the parlor. A half hour later, the sound of horses on the stage road signaled the approach of General Grant. Entering the house, Grant greeted Lee in the center of the room.

The day after the Surrender signing it was decided that the Confederate soldiers should have parole papers for his men to carry with them so as not to be assumed to be deserters. So the immediately got three presses, 2 are shown, and began drawing up over 35,000 forms for the confederate men.
The generals presented a contrasting appearance; Lee in a new uniform and Grant in his mud-spattered field uniform. Grant, who remembered meeting Lee once during the Mexican War, asked the Confederate general if he recalled their meeting.

A Parole Pass for C F Watson. This picture is the best I could do, remember this pass is over 150 years old.
Lee replied that he did, and the two conversed in a very cordial manner, for approximately 25 minutes. The subject had not yet gotten around to surrender until finally, Lee, feeling the anguish of defeat, brought Grant’s attention to it. Grant, who later confessed to being embarrassed at having to ask for the surrender from Lee, said simply that the terms would be just as he had outlined them in a previous letter.

The surrender meeting happened in April but prior to that Grant and President Lincoln had a meeting. In that meeting had asked General Grant to be considerate to General Lee. They both knew that the Lee surrender was going to happen the question was how much longer. The Confederates were basically starved into surrendering. It was Lincoln’s attitude that the surrender terms would go along way in re-unifying the country. Lee had only two personal choices; win or disperse his army. A result of dispersing all his troops would reek havoc on the locals. He wanted a good outcome that his men could accept willingly.  The only choice was to contemplate surrender.
The terms would parole officers and enlisted men but required that all Confederate military equipment be relinquished. The discussion between the generals then drifted into the prospects for peace, but Lee, once again taking the lead, asked Grant to put his terms in writing.
Some of the other room in this historic home. Most of all the furniture is authentic to the house.

This is a personal likeable picture. The unit is so small that unless you were looking for it you might not see it. It’s a scaled down wood cutting table with saw for the nearby fireplace” FYI!

Below is the formal eating area with the best of the family dishware. Above is reality. This is where the family, most likely, ate most of their meals. This is a “Neo-Clasical” home, meaning that as you climbed all those stairs in the front of the house you actually walked in onto the second floor of the home. The dining table above would be found on the bottom level.


Once again above is the informal eating area. Below is the kitchen. In that time-period it would be normal to find the kitchen area located to the side of the home. The reason for this would be in case of fire.

When Grant finished, he handed the terms to his former adversary, and Lee — first donning spectacles used for reading– quietly looked them over.
This picture, to the left, only merits a small entry since the NPS person was just there to be helpful so Carla needed some help on the local bugs. As his dissertation went on he got into kitchens. Having been exposed to this information years ago with our Gettysburg trip on how and why kitchens were not usually part of the living portions of a typical home, he began talking about fires. He mentioned the majority of fire related burnings began in the kitchen. He then went further on to say; the majority of deaths for women were related to fire. The heavy clothing with multiple layers made it very difficult for a woman on fire to disrobe and shed her clothing in order to save herself, sad!
When he finished reading, the bespectacled Lee looked up at Grant and remarked “This will have a very happy effect on my army.” Lee asked if the terms allowed his men to keep their horses, for in the Confederate army men owned their mounts. Lee explained that his men would need these animals to farm once they returned to civilian life.
Once again, I asked the NPS gentleman, about the little teepee structure to the left of the main home. (For what it’s worth, I already knew the answer.) I knew he would tell us that this structure was used to preserve foods keeping them cool by letting a stream of water flow through the structure. He was nice very forth coming with his answer. It was an “ice house.” That’s not what I had expected and I told him. He confirmed my understanding but enlightened me by explaining that Virginia has very few underground streams do to all the rock, slate and marble in the ground, therefore no stream cooling. Inside the ice house a hole would be dug, possibly as deep as 20 to 24 feet deep. During the winter season chunks of ice would be cut up and carried to the ice house. Once filled with enough ice to last the hot summer months the ice would be covered with hay to shield the ice from the summer heat.
Grant responded that he would not change the terms as written (which had no provisions allowing private soldiers to keep their mounts) but would order his officers to allow any Confederate claiming a horse or a mule to keep it. General Lee agreed that this concession would go a long way toward promoting healing. Grant’s generosity extended further.

The partially grassy area in the center of the picture is the original Lynchburg to Richmond Road. Why is this worth mentioning? In order to get to either destination you had to go through Appomattox. For years this brought a great deal of commerce and settlers to Appomattox, until! The railroad. Prior to the railroad taverns, eateries and rooms to board were all doing a very nice business. ( Just think of it, in 1865 sixty-five thousand Union troops walked down this road to Appomattox.)
The towns folks fought bitterly to have the train station located in this general area, but the powers to be had their own opinion. The RR Station would be three miles from this location. Three miles may not seem that much since we can drive there in about five minutes but back then people had to walk. Mot everyone on the train would, from that time on, stay on the train until their destination, and the town had to remake itself. The picture below is the current Lynchburg to Richmond Road. Needless to say both Lynchburg and Richmond grew exponentially thanks to the railroad.
When Lee mentioned that his men had been without rations for several days, the Union commander arranged for 25, 000 rations to be sent to the hungry Confederates.
In addition to feeding the Confederate Soldiers, this day since they were hungry, this parole pass would permit them to eat at no charge at any and all government installations these soldiers came across as they made their way back home.
After formal copies of the surrender terms, and Lee’s acceptance, had been drafted and exchanged, the meeting ended.
Before he met with General Grant, one of Lee’s officers (General E. Porter Alexander) had suggested fighting a guerilla war, but Lee had rejected the idea. It would only cause more pain and suffering for a cause that was lost. The character of both Lee and Grant was of such a high order that the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia has been called “The Gentlemen’s Agreement.”
The Emancipation Proclamation was signed by Lincoln a couple of years ago and the South was not accepting it. This surrender hopefully would unify the North and South and hopefully allow the Emancipation Proclamation to be further enacted. Lincoln would not live to see this happen. Only two days after the signing President Lincoln would be assassinated.
Courtesy of the National Park service
 

The McLean home.                                                   This was the local jail.

 Another picture of the County Courthouse with its Knee and hip killing steps.
This would be the General Store, and then some. It’s a regular Ace Hardware Place. 
Yes, this is also the post office as well as a Pharmacy. The little yellow shed to the right is an attorney’s office.

All kinds of stuff from dishes to fireplace needs, even some farming supplies.

Once again, the Lynchburg/Richmond road right through the center of Appomattox. The gentleman above is a retired doctor with a great deal of time on his hands. We sat and tolerated him for twenty minutes and he was still asking folks who they were and where they came from. If I wasn’t certain that the Kentucky Fried Chicken Colonel had died, I’d be certain this was he.

This volunteer was really good. Got right to the facts. He saw that most of us were seniors and we did not have time to spare. He went into just enough detail, but not overly so, to paint an awesome picture about the logistics of the Union forces and of course the confederates as well as the impact the railroad had on the town. He was a pleasure to listen to.

 

 

Freedom Tower Oculus

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9.23.18


A view of the Oculus from the Observatory floor of the Freedom Tower.















Vanderbilt Mansion-(pictorial)

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9.14

The Mansion driveway, what else!





Above is our host greeting us at the mansion entrance.

The after dinner room for the men.

In this foyer are three doorways. The one to the left is where the men would retreat to after dinner.

The gals, on the other hand, would settle into the room opposite from the men and socialize, the room you see above. Some random pictures of some of the other 50 rooms in this building. Between the two room described above is  basically a very elegant gathering area. From here they would gather until summoned to the dining area.

Above and below is the doorway in the middle.

The Grand Dining Room above. Below is a picture of the men’s gathering room to the left of the chair and to the right of the other chair is the ladies room.

Ceiling height on the first floor is eighteen feet. Looking down the stairway of thirty-nine steps to the second level. In the picture below is the upper level.

Some pictures of some of the rooms on this level. This would be the main sleeping area for the one per center’s attending. If you did not qualify you slept on the third level along with any single women and female staffers.  Single men would be sleeping in the now Visitor Center.

This would be the Vanderbilt’s sleeping quarters. Not exactly shabby. Myself, I’d probably have a difficult time trying to get to sleep with all the opulence in this room. It did not seem to bother these folks.

Down deep they wanted to shape this new country in the image of England where the upper 2%ers would control properties and industry and provide an opportunity for Amerscans to follow to appreciate their place in this world working for this new class of individuals, as indentured savants.
This is really a bit much. No wonder it could not be sold. Unlike other venues from the past the furnishings in this mansion are all authentic and all was part of the household at that time.

Another bedroom.

Going down to the basement level.

The staffers Dining Room. They ate as well as the folks above. Food was about the same, they drank from crystal glassware and they enjoyed very generous Christmas gratuities. A few worked their entire lives here and many had over ten years employment. They were treated like family.

Frederick Vanderbilt, the owner and builder of the mansion, knew how important it was to keep and appreciate all their staffers. Once electricity became readily available he was asked if he wanted to electrify the freezer closet, which until now, was the privy of the house “ice cutters.” He declined to have it modernized since he would have to lay off the two staffers who maintained the unit.

Views from the back of the mansion. You can see the Hudson River in the distance.

The mansion had fifty rooms and over seven-hundred acres. As big as that might sound it was considered their cottage to retreat to during the hot summer months. As the story goes the Vanderbilt’s were filthy rich and the next generation were fortunate enough to double their wealth. Then came the third generation. They specialized in enjoying their inherited wealth. It did not take to many years for this generation to realize the cottage was expensive to maintain, and quite honestly they were tired of going there. The widowed wife of the grandson to Frederick was left several million in cash which she kept but decided to sell the estate. It went on the market for $350,000. She never got a bite on the property. She then lowered the price to $250,000 with the same results. It wasn’t until FDR, a neighbor not that far away in Hyde Park approached her to donate the land and property to, which would soon be, the National Park Service which she did. Before the NPS acquired the estate, she confiscated all the valuable and aged wines the mansion had acquired prior to turning over the keys to the property.

McCain Funeral (pictorial)

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9.1- The John McCain Funeral celebrationFor certain Carla and I were not invited to this historical event. I apologize for the graininess of many of the pictures. I was fortunate, many years ago, to have possessed one of those ultra high definition Samsung TVs, that unfortunately we have no longer. Our present television just does not have the quality picture our old set did, but for this blog it’s passable. At a future time I may come back and insert some comments and subtitles, but for now, it’s mostly pictures.

Ivana and Jared Kirchner were in attendance but not so for her father, the President, Donald Trump. Scoots, our cat, decided early she was not that interested in this event.



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All these pictures, except for about that last six images are in chronological order.


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Meghan McCain giving an eulogy for her father. Jack McCain was there for his mom. This was a scene from around the Danny Boy song.


Jim McCain quotes from the bible as well.


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Scoots is still not interested, unlike Carla and I.


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Still not interested.

The man to the right is the Russian who Russia tried to poison TWICE.



I found this image fitting to end this blog.

Lake George (pictorial)

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8.27 Monday – We explore Lake George.









Travel back in time and view the beauty of Lake George’s Southern Basin the way people did over 100 years ago, from the decks of our authentic Sternwheel Steamboat Minne Ha Ha. The Calliope, powered by steam from the vessel’s boiler, serenades you as you board. Enjoy beautiful views of the Adirondack Mountains and see stately homes along the water’s edge. This post is courtesy of the Lake George Steamboat Co.




Not this time around, maybe in a couple of years we’ll explore this fort.

We ended this long and exhausting day with an Ice Cream from the Hershey stand in this center.

Fort Ticonderoga

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8.27 Monday – There’s always a Visitor’s Center.


You find some in the beginning and some as you leave the venue area. Fort Ticonderoga is at the start of our adventure. Carla always enjoys a beautiful flower arrangement.



Natural defences for the fort are: 1. Land mass upper left in the above picture is Mount Independence. 2. Land mass to the right is Mound Defiance. 3. The body of water in front of the fort is Lake Champlain. The photo below gives a short description of the importance of the first two areas.


This young man is preparing the evening meal. He called it “Mess.” What does the word Mess actually mean. “Mess Hall” I understood. But using the word “mess” to describe a meal I found puzzling. He couldn’t help me on this either. Hard Tack was also being served with the meal; see second photo down.




Above is an example of Indian writing for those times.

Delivering cannons and munitions from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston, Mass; a 300 mile journey in the winter of 1775. Trip, I believe, was done in thirty days.


We spoke and learned about this type of gun (second rifle down on the back wall). Originally, as I mentioned before, I thought this would be a sniper rifle, but no, it’s used to hunt fowler.

These two guys are making and repairing shoes and boots.



Gentleman above is repairing clothing. Photo below are typical of the “winter clothing” needed by the troops. Second photo down are summer/spring clothing on the wall hanger.

 

 

This photo to the left has little to do with anything. This is a photo of a “woman” who wanted to carry a gun and be part of this man’s army.  Ironically she was able to serve her full term of two years and hit her femininity at the same time. She was given an honorable discharge and went on to the stage and wrote a couple of book on her times in the army.

The purpose of this picture is the flag at half mast, unlike the flag flying above the Trumpblican White House. After a great deal of pressure from WH Aids and Veterans associations Trump gave in and allowed “his” flag to go to half mast.

Littleton NH. Memory Lane

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8.16- Thursday

Downtown Littleton. Below is the Thayer’s Hotel. It’s is now a B&B but it does not matter. It was there on the third floor balcony, as seen in the picture below, that I proposed to Carla. The very next day we went across the street to the Parker Market Place where she found and purchased the dress she wore on our wedding day. The Parker shop was owned, as we discovered, by the wife of the son (Stanley Parker Jr.) of the man I worked for in the sixties and seventies as a pharmacist.

Dog sleeping in store.

Porfido’s used to be, and I’m sure still has the best pizza in town. Spent many a dollar there during my single days at the time. Below is Chutter’s. It used to be called Parker Drug Store, where I worked as a pharmacist, but that was a hundred years ago.

Up is Chutter’s inside. Looks much better and more exciting than the Parker Drug Store. Below is another picture of Chutter’s.

Above is Pollyanna, the Littleton child mascot. Once again, the Thayer’s Hotel…good memories.

This is the Democratic bench. The Trumpblican bench is on the other side of the doorway.

We enjoyed a couple of hours touring Littleton again and reliving memories so old they’re prime to be forgotten. It was about a mile up from Littleton off the Franconia Road that we owned our first home, on Morrison Hill Dr I believe. On many occassions we enjoyed a picnic in our back yard when I came home for lunch with Michael sitting on the edge on the picnic blanket. Like all trips they come to an end. The following pictures are from our drive home.

Below, I purchased another t-shirt and Carla purchased a box of “chocolate covered orange peal” candies from Chutter’s Candy Store.

Field of Dreams

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6.29 Field of Dreams

The Field of Dreams venue is located in Dyersville, IA and short distance from Dubuque. These are just a couple of pictures of how beautifully green and lush this part of the country really is.

This is the farm house and the baseball diamond that’s known to everyone. The movie made the farmhouse look considerably bigger, but it is what it is.
There’s always someplace to pick up souvenirs. This place is no exception. We don’t usually pick up stuff like this but this place was special.


The white picket fence, we’re told was no in the movie but is there now. Families and kids a traversing all over the property. Kids and Dads with baseball hats and jerseys on pitching from the diamond.

The pictures explain themselves, the original owners of the property. Below some stats on the property and the movie.


Joyce and Don enjoying the luxury of an old fractioned glider; are these still made. And exactly how tall does corn grow? Carla is 5 ft. 3 in and the corn still has a lot more growing to do.


The diamond and batters box were in use but we did have a chance to walk the bases, which we did. Below is a far away picture of the complex from the entrance. The remaining pictures are for your appreciation. Iowa is a state as green as Boca and you can see forever.




Franciscan Sisters

6.11 The Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration. We do this quite often, visiting a church or cathedral, today would be no exception. This year, more than any other we’d enjoyed together, we were made to realize that every day is a gift from Him and as such we should find venues that reflect our thanks for his giving us another day to enjoy.


6.11 The Franciscan Sisters are part of the Franciscan orders of priests, sisters and laity. It’s a big complex and at present fifty nuns, of all ages, reside at the convent. It is also their corporate headquarters. The building above also goes back almost equally as long.
This is the reception hall. You’ll notice Tom is absent, he had a Doctor’s appointment to  attend. Within a few minutes we were greeted by Sister Sarah. She was totally knowledgeable of everything in the building and its history. In the bottom picture is a statue of St. Michael. In 1923 and fire threatened to destroy the entire the St. Rose Convent, one sister died. The Statue of St. Michael was to guard and protect the  sacred chapels at this end of the convent. Even thought the fire destroyed the entire west wing of the facility and fire abruptly stopped when it approached the St. Michael statue.  The Angel Gabriel is represented here was the angel that appeared to Mary way back in the beginnings. 

Sister Sarah talking to Carla. The pews and stations of the cross were all done by local artisans in Lacrosse, WI. That also includes all the wood furnishings like the pulpits. All the windows in the chapels are stain glass. They were imported from the Royal Bavarian Art Institute of Munich, Germany.

  Back in 1865 a promise was made by Mother Antonia Herb that a chapel would be constructed and that “perpetual adoration” would also be promised. Since the completion of the original chapel and least two Franciscan Sisters have prayed in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament since 1878. 

The congregation, back in the late 1800’s were not rich. However, to look closely at the construction you’d only wonder where the found and how could they afford all this marble. The truth is that they couldn’t. What you see is not Venetian Marble but rather concrete and plaster. Every square inch of the concrete was meticulously hand painted, walls and ceilings, to resemble marble.  

This is the back of the facility. I believe it forms a square with a privacy yard in the center.
There is just to much to talk about in this blog but click on the link below and visit the Web Site for this religious order.
Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration

Chiluly St Pete, FL

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5.17.17
Tomorrow, on Friday 18th, we’re going on our first field trip in over a year, if not , almost two years. We’ll be traveling with Abby and beau, Michael, and will visit Chiluly St. Pete. We’ve been to this type of exhibit before in Seattle but, to the best of our knowledge, Abby has not seen something like this before. We’re now residing in Orlando, actually Clermont, at the Orlando Thousand Trails RV Park. We arrived a couple of days ago and are now living with 50 amp juice and it’s a very big RV Park.
A little glitch. We heard back from Abby and Michael, by text, that meeting on Friday was not possible. Plan B would be to reset the trip for Saturday. And as the best laid plans would turn out, Saturday was the day we would go to St. Pete.

Son of God. Movie view on Netflix

3.31.18

We, possibly like many of you, experience the Lenten Season with some daily sacrifices and, of course, all the obligations of the Holy Days. By the time Carla and I get to Holy Week, at least I, find myself wishing I’d done just a little more. But, now it’s Holy Week. Usually in the evening, after viewing the local and national news stations, we’ll search for a movie, if nothing else is worth watching. On Good Friday, Saturday and Easter Sunday we try to find something appropriate related to the weekend.

This year we found a good movie on Friday but the Saturday movie will be an annual event for us in the future. We found it on Netflix, but I will intensely look to try to acquire the DVD.

Son of God. It’s a two-hour production and worth every minute of watching.

Hope you have a chance to view it some day.